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  1. #1
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    100 vs 120 vs 100/120 talas for JET 9 RDO

    Gathering my info for my Jet 9 RDO build and I would like know your experiences/likes/dislikes about your forks. I'm leaning most toward getting a 120 fork because I don't see myself swithching between the 120/100 settings on the Talas. However, those of you that do run a Talas I would like to know if you use the height settings much. Additionally, if you could choose again, would you forgo the Talas and by a straight up 100 or 120 mm fork and save cash and weight. Finally, for the non-Talas guys, is the 120 fork the way to go? I would really love to hear all of your fork preferences for this bike! I personally do occasional races, but most rides are with friends to have fun in so-cal in the Laguna Mountains and around San Diego. Thanks.

  2. #2
    Phatt Tire Luva'
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    I was very hesitant on making the move that took me 4 weeks to do, and when I finally made it I kept the fingers tightly crossed. 200+ miles later - not a damn chance I'd change anything! 140 34 Float with a 20mm reducer! I'd make the exact same call if I did it all again tomorrow.
    Ciao,

    -A-


    “Beer, if drank in moderation, softens the temper, cheers the spirit and promotes health”

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Qanuk View Post
    I was very hesitant on making the move that took me 4 weeks to do, and when I finally made it I kept the fingers tightly crossed. 200+ miles later - not a damn chance I'd change anything! 140 34 Float with a 20mm reducer! I'd make the exact same call if I did it all again tomorrow.
    So you got the heavier duty stanchions for an extra stiff fork. That's cool! I hope this doesn't sound stupid and obvious, but does the 20mm reducer effectively make the fork a 120mm fork? If so, does this mess with the spring rate in a negative way?

  4. #4
    Phatt Tire Luva'
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    Yes, 120mm front end on her - matches perfect with the rear. I couldn't see ever running a 95/100 on my setup. And there bas been no ill effect on spring rate that I'm aware of.
    Ciao,

    -A-


    “Beer, if drank in moderation, softens the temper, cheers the spirit and promotes health”

  5. #5
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    I originally got the talas for my rdo just to get black. I'm usually a set it and forget it rider...Now, I use the height adjustment all the time. The 2 position lever is just so easy (compared to the talas of old). I find the 95mm setting perfect for doing really tech steep sections with big step ups.

  6. #6
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    I have the 120 Talus and never touch it. There is a huge stiffness difference between the F29 9mm and the F32 with the 15mm - obvious, I know but until yesterday I never really thought about it. I was running fast around something and I thought to myself - this front wheel goes exactly where I want it to. So - for me - the 120 non-Talus would be the way to go.

  7. #7
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    Thanks for the info guys. It's a dead heat! Anybody else with any compelling experiences one way ort the other?

  8. #8
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    I have the 120/95 Talas. I partly got it because it came in black, but I do change the length to 95 when I'm climbing most of the time. It's very simple to change. Having the 120 option for the downhills and the 95 for climbing seems to work good for me. However, at some point I'd like to see the difference if I climb the same hill with the 120 setting to see if it makes much of a difference.

  9. #9
    Carbon & Ti rule
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    Quote Originally Posted by gritnteeth View Post
    Thanks for the info guys. It's a dead heat! Anybody else with any compelling experiences one way ort the other?
    Hi, how tall are you & what seat height do you run ?

    I'm 6 ft & run my seat heigh. 800mm & wouldn't even want to try 100mm for most my riding.

  10. #10
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    I have a Talas 12/95 and almost never drop to 95. 120 float would be ideal.

  11. #11
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    Ok guys, I need some help.

    I still have and love my Tang RDO. I ride it as an aggressive trail bike and weigh around 190 with gear.

    Recently I've been experiencing a clicking/creaking sound around the headset. To troubleshoot, I've done the following:

    - loosened and retightened stem and bars
    - removed headset, cleaned and re-installed
    - switched brakes and front wheel

    No matter what I do, I still have creaking and clicking that happens--most noticeable when standing to mash and when applying heavy front brakes.

    Any ideas? I'ts driving me crazy.

    Tony

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by akaktm View Post
    Ok guys, I need some help.

    I still have and love my Tang RDO. I ride it as an aggressive trail bike and weigh around 190 with gear.

    Recently I've been experiencing a clicking/creaking sound around the headset. To troubleshoot, I've done the following:

    - loosened and retightened stem and bars
    - removed headset, cleaned and re-installed
    - switched brakes and front wheel

    No matter what I do, I still have creaking and clicking that happens--most noticeable when standing to mash and when applying heavy front brakes.

    Any ideas? I'ts driving me crazy.

    Tony
    Check your cables...housing can sometimes make those sounds. Also, carbon fiber can act like a ventriloquist, and "throw voices / noises" and appear to come from other places.

    With a friend, sit / stand on the bike next to a steady surface ( counter, work bench, wall ) , rocking it, compressing, trying to make the creaking and clicking, while your friend leans down to see if he can determine where the sound is coming from. It's often not what you think or expect, or where.

    Viola!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by muzzanic View Post
    Hi, how tall are you & what seat height do you run ?

    I'm 6 ft & run my seat heigh. 800mm & wouldn't even want to try 100mm for most my riding.
    I'm 5'10" with short legs and a long torso. I run my seat at 725mm. Typically I'm comfortable with a 23.75" TT and a 90mm stem.

  14. #14
    COMBO - President
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    I've heard the Niner reps say the geometry is the same between RDO and regular Jet but my first hand experience om old style Jet, new Jet and RDO Jet is that the RDO steers way quickly. I run a 120 on my Jet RDO and ran 100 and 120 on my old jets. I much prefer the 120 especially for the RDO.
    Hope to meet you on the trails!

    Gregg Soster
    Central Ohio Mountain Biking Organization - President

  15. #15
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    120 Talas and id do it again but im a big guy

  16. #16
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    Is the Fox34 set at 120 steeper than the F32 Talas at 120? I thought I read the F34's offset was longer

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by mglicks View Post
    I have the 120/95 Talas. I partly got it because it came in black, but I do change the length to 95 when I'm climbing most of the time. It's very simple to change. Having the 120 option for the downhills and the 95 for climbing seems to work good for me. However, at some point I'd like to see the difference if I climb the same hill with the 120 setting to see if it makes much of a difference.
    Agreed on the Talas. I'm 5'11 160 lb. and run 30" seat height from BB. I ride SF Bay Area and Lake Tahoe trails - plenty of steep climbs and descents on singletrack and doubletrack. I use the 95mm for better tracking on steep climbs, a more comfortable climbing position and better handling in very technical sections - whether climbing or not. 120 mm for most everything else. I like to switch positions just for kicks as well - 95mm makes for a fast racing position/performance and 120mm for more big mountain and everyday riding. The Talas provides enough variation to make me feel like I have 2 bikes in one. Changing positions also relieves pressure on my shoulders and hands on 6-7 hour rides, if I do happen to get tight. Just varying riding position (either direction) helps to make a long day even more fun.

    I'm sure that I could be happy with either a 100 or 120 fixed fork as well. But I think the 100 would be a little too quick-steering on fast descents. And I would miss the 95 on steep climbs. Mostly I like feeling like I have 2 bikes in one with a quick flip of the lever.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by mike_mtn View Post
    Agreed on the Talas. I'm 5'11 160 lb. and run 30" seat height from BB. I ride SF Bay Area and Lake Tahoe trails - plenty of steep climbs and descents on singletrack and doubletrack. I use the 95mm for better tracking on steep climbs, a more comfortable climbing position and better handling in very technical sections - whether climbing or not. 120 mm for most everything else. I like to switch positions just for kicks as well - 95mm makes for a fast racing position/performance and 120mm for more big mountain and everyday riding. The Talas provides enough variation to make me feel like I have 2 bikes in one. Changing positions also relieves pressure on my shoulders and hands on 6-7 hour rides, if I do happen to get tight. Just varying riding position (either direction) helps to make a long day even more fun.

    I'm sure that I could be happy with either a 100 or 120 fixed fork as well. But I think the 100 would be a little too quick-steering on fast descents. And I would miss the 95 on steep climbs. Mostly I like feeling like I have 2 bikes in one with a quick flip of the lever.
    Great review Mike. It all makes sense to me. Now I'm leaning more toward the Talas.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by gritnteeth View Post
    Great review Mike. It all makes sense to me. Now I'm leaning more toward the Talas.
    Glad to help. I went through similar decision process when building my RDO. I also decided to go with a dropper post (Spec Command Post Black Lite). It added some weight to the build but provides a lot of flexibilty while riding steep and/or very fast descents. The rear tire bites harder and increases control which allows higher speed. Like the Talas, I use it a lot more than I ever expected.

  20. #20
    Dirty South Underdog
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    I've come to the conclusion that asking the 120/100 question is very much like asking "Which saddle should I get?"
    I got the Talus fork because I couldn't make up my mind if I wanted to run 120 or 100 (it also matches... which is of equal importance ). I almost always leave mine on 120mm. My coworker, who is an equally, if not more, competent bike handler rode my bike and hated it at 120, but loved it at 95. We just have different riding styles, and, based on that and what I've read here, whether you like the Jet9 RDO at 120 or 100 will be highly dependent on that.
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrea138 View Post
    I've come to the conclusion that asking the 120/100 question is very much like asking "Which saddle should I get?"
    I got the Talus fork because I couldn't make up my mind if I wanted to run 120 or 100 (it also matches... which is of equal importance ). I almost always leave mine on 120mm. My coworker, who is an equally, if not more, competent bike handler rode my bike and hated it at 120, but loved it at 95. We just have different riding styles, and, based on that and what I've read here, whether you like the Jet9 RDO at 120 or 100 will be highly dependent on that.
    I would have to highly disagree with you. Just like you said it's all about riding style. And I have not ridden this bike yet, let alone I don't know how the bike works with 120 or 100 forks. Therefore I don't have a riding style for this bike yet. I'm considering this bike because everyones wonderful posts (all opinions). I realize these are all unique opinions/experiences that I have none about this bike and fork combination. I'm certain that you looked on this forum to read opinions on this bike before you bought yours (I love your Jet RDO set-up BTW).

    So getting back on topic, I would love to hear your opinion on why you use the 120 for your riding style along with your coworkers opinion about the 100 as well. It's helpful because I can apply your knowledge and experiences to my riding style. If they mesh, your info can help me make a better decisions to guide me on my fork purchase.

  22. #22
    Dirty South Underdog
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    I didn't read opinions on this bike before I bought it, I just saw a carbon fiber Jet9 and went for it. There weren't really any posts available at the time as to which travel feels how.

    As far as I can tell, my riding style, in general (any bike), is balanced more over the rear wheel and using my body weight as much as possible to control the bike. I like to dive into corners and ignore any small obstacles that might be in the way of the fast lines. Watching my co-worker ride, his center of gravity is more over the middle of the bike, and he's got more finesse in avoiding and/or lifting his wheels up & over stuff instead of just going all out monster truck-style.
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  23. #23
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    Personally, I need a reason to justify more travel, not less.

    The 100mm fork leaves me wanting nothing. Then again, I would have preferred that the RDO was just a carbon version of the original Jet (3" bike) so my tastes appear to be different than the average full suspension rider.

  24. #24
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    Compared to all the longer Travel 29ers out there now, I reckon the RDO is like a hardtail with a nice bit of plushiness outback

  25. #25
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    I have the Talas terralogic. I like a front end that is lighter and higher, and almost always ride at 120mm. The steering is marginally quicker at 95mm, but I prefer the monster-truck feel of the longer fork. If you look at the geometries, an RDO running at 120mm is nearly identical to a RIP 9 running at 120mm (save 0.5" travel in the rear).

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