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Thread: AFR Redeux

  1. #1
    Err
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    AFR Redeux

    So, my AFR had just entered it's 5th iteration now and I figured I'd post some updates.

    Last summer I started out with this build which was based on the updated 66* HTA. I immediately found it to jump great and climb well for a freeride bike but I found it a little tall and unruly in the corners. The standover was also a bit much with the angle of the top-tube so it didn't stay stock long-




    So, I swapped in some 12 mm rise bars in place of the 25 mm rise I had and replaced the stock 8.75 x 2.75 shock with 8.5 x 2.5 shock. This really brought the bike to life. It went to Jackson, WY this way and felt great on the trails off of Teton pass. I have another thread on short-shocking the AFR if you want to read about it but basically it dropped the BB from 14.5" to 14.25" and slacked the HTA to about 65.5*. The AFR became a cornering machine with this setup and incredibly confidence inspiring. Sorry no full shot of this iteration -


    But here's an action shot from Jackson, my bud shot this from up in a tree above the jump -


    Later in the summer, I swapped for a custom frame with a 16" seat tube and a 65* HTA which dropped to 64.5* with my short shock. This version straight up ripped. I took it to Whistler and Winter Park with this build and it just killed the jump lines and milder tech trails. At the same time, it was still totally capable on the longer days of pedaling up classic North Shore spots such a Fromme. Build weight was right around 37 lbs with this setup -




    Getting inverted in Whistler on version #3 -


    So following all the big bike park trips for the year, I knew I was really digging this bike but didn't have many lines big enough to warrant 7" mode. So, I raided the parts bin and wound up with a 33lb build with a Float 36 160 mm and an RP23 along with a nice light 1750 wheelset. This build kept most of the wheelbase and the same stable characteristics of the 7" version but was much more poppy without feeling sketchy on bigger lines the way a really light bike can. Since I was running a flush mount bottom cup, the HTA jumped up to somewhere around 65.75* (roughly) and the BB dropped way down to around 13.5". I rode this build all over our local trails and a couple of desert rides, probably put 150 or 200 miles on it before the snow shut me down. No poser shots of this iteration, but proof positive that it didn't compromise the AFR's launch capacity -


    Finally, it's spring time again. New year and I've got a new 7" bike in the stable but couldn't stand to part with the AFR. The wifey has really been stepping up her park riding so I figured she'd get good use out of it on lines that are more fun on a bike like this than a full DH rig. So, I setup both the Elka and RP23 for her, I also kept the Float 160 but slid in an external lower HS cup to bring the BB up a touch and bring the slack back a bit. I had other plans for my 1750 wheelset so I laced up some I9 classics to EX500's with Sapim CX-Rays and alloy nips. That's a 2.4 Fat Albert on the back and a 2.35 Muddy Mary up front, both single-ply, triple-nano, tubeless. Oh and I stole my Saint brakes and set her up with Elixrs. All in at just a hair over 32 lbs and ready to rock. It'll see 7" mode in the rear with the Elka and 6" mode with the RP23. Elka for rougher trails and bike park, RP23 for local, buff jump lines. Updates to follow as she racks up the miles -


    Last edited by Err; 04-15-2011 at 12:48 PM.

  2. #2
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    sick bike.

    again!

  3. #3
    steep fast and loose :)
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    Afr proven to be a woman's bike. Nice work fella.

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    This is a a great thread Err, made all the more relevant and interesting by the simple fact that you can obviously ride a bike!

    I love the way you can experiment with Nics and mix thing up a little to see what effect it has.

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    Great post, phots look great as usual, wish'n I had a fraction of the skill you look to have

  6. #6
    Err
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    OK, just laughing to myself that I can't count. The AFR is now in its 5th iteration, not 4th but fortunately I caught that before anyone else.

    The reason I finally sat down and made this post is that you can take most any bike, shuffle around components and still ride it. It might ride like a POS but you can still ride it. The AFR seems to have genuine versatility though. I can honestly say I've had as much of a blast riding it chainless at Whistler @ 37lbs in 7" mode as 6 hours of desert trails in Fruita @ 32lbs in 6" mode. Not many bikes can convincingly display such range of character.

    I can't take credit for most of the photos. It took the easy poser shots but the action shots are all my bud Adam Riser -> livewithcommitment.blogspot.com. He's damn good with an SLR.


    TLR - It is definitely a girlz bike now. I just hope you guys can keep up with her.

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    Err- Very nice.
    An all round bike.

    32 lbs,thats a sweet weight

    Any pedal strike

  8. #8
    Err
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    Quote Originally Posted by norcosam
    Any pedal strike


    The unending topic around these parts....

    I'm not a pedal strike sensitive guy, I love low BB's and have long since learned to time my strokes without even really thinking about it. That said, I wondered a bit about strikes in the desert but it was never an issue. One of my favorite trails in Fruita is Holy Cross and it's a tech delight with lots of ledge ups and downs, tight rocks, and ratcheting. I had zero issues. and like I said, I put a ton of trail miles on it in various areas without a hitch. Even better, there's a fairly famously steep and techy entrance to Horse Thief in Fruita which can cause peeps a lot of grief, especially on average trail bikes. On the AFR I was able to spot the line and roll it without a worry, credit to being slack, low and stable.

    Horse Thief entrance for reference (random photo from google search, not mine) -

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