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  1. #1
    mtbr member
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    Numbers of Female Riders

    As the parent of a female XC racer in the Northeast I'm interested to know the participation level of females in other regions of the country. My daughter rides in a XC series in the Northeast with very few other girls. We moved her up a category to the Boys B due to the lack of competition in the G category. Are the number of young female rides promising in your areas and if so where did they come from/get their experience and initially take up riding. I'd love to see more girls on her team and in the race series but don't know how to draw them to the sport. Any suggestions would be great.

  2. #2
    J-Flo
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldIcehouse View Post
    As the parent of a female XC racer in the Northeast I'm interested to know the participation level of females in other regions of the country. My daughter rides in a XC series in the Northeast with very few other girls. We moved her up a category to the Boys B due to the lack of competition in the G category. Are the number of young female rides promising in your areas and if so where did they come from/get their experience and initially take up riding. I'd love to see more girls on her team and in the race series but don't know how to draw them to the sport. Any suggestions would be great.
    A large number of girls race in the Norcal league. However, very few of them are on my son's team (most of them just graduated last year or are too committed to other activities and won't be on the team this year) and we are actively looking for strategies to keep the team co-ed. I too would be interested to know what works.

  3. #3
    It's about showing up.
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    Girls make up about 18-20% of the total riders in NorCal in the last few years, plateauing somewhat since 2008. In 2002 there were 8-10%. Statistically girls drop out over the season at a lower rate than boys. Boys tend to experiment more with this sort of thing than girls.

    Boys are also a bit more accustomed to deflecting many of the support features within the operation of teams as they have more experience with teams and are more independent. Support features for girls are embraced more as they are more accustomed to being nurtured.

    1) Think in terms of the social nature of young women. Look at the social bonds seen in softball, soccer, volleyball. Also, note that all of these sports have a more developed ramp-up to the high school level. In addition, the families are trained to support these girls, further strengthening these bonds. These are huge keys. The individual girl is just that; a cadre is what is needed.

    2) While most females have been brought into the sport by dads, the presence of adult females in the program is a strong factor for retaining and attracting girls. That said, many of the most successful teams with girls simply have talented men who know how to handle girls/teens/boys and their relationships.
    Last edited by Berkeley Mike; 10-03-2012 at 09:32 AM.
    I don't rattle.

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