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  1. #1
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    Riding tubeless in Albuquerque

    So I've been riding for a while now but I'm a total newb when it comes to riding tubeless. Everything seems to be set up just right but when I ride I loose pressure. I start at 30lbs every ride. When I'm done I'm down around 20lbs or less. I understand that an occasional burp is normal but this seems excessive. I'm posting this in the New Mexico forum because we live in the land of goatheads. My theory as to why I am loosing so much air is because of these little gems. I've noticed after every ride I don't have and goatheads in the tire but after closer inspection they just break the thorns off in the tire. I haven't taken the thorns out yet and think this is my problem. Should I be using tweezers to pull the thorns out and let the Stan's do the work? With them in there it makes me think that they're just re-opening the "wound" with every ride. Am I headed in the right direction? Do I just need to refresh my sealant for the summer season? (I think it's about 6 months old) Thanks to everyone in advance.

  2. #2
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    Who set your tubeless up?
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  3. #3
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    When I first moved here I thought tubeless was a scam. First 4 rides I had 8 flats so I decided to give it a shot. Now all of the bikes I have are running tubeless with out any issues. Only time the tires loose air is when the Stans gets old. Do not want to know how many goatheads or thorns are in my tires currently but do know it is several. If the sealant is 6 months old I'd add another batch in the tire and go for a ride. No need to peel off the old dried sealant as it is still plugging existing holes.

  4. #4
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    I did. It's all Bontrager stuff. Tires, wheels and strips. I used stan's in them. When I first did it all they worked great. The problem has started in just the last few weeks of riding.

  5. #5
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    Sweet. Thanks for the info. I'll try adding more sealant.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by crux View Post
    If the sealant is 6 months old I'd add another batch in the tire and go for a ride. No need to peel off the old dried sealant as it is still plugging existing holes.
    This.

    After riding tubeless for a year, I found that often my tires had ZERO liquid sealant in them, but the dried layer acts like a sealing gasket and I still didn't get flats.

    Also, when you mount up your new tires on the rims with sealant, lay them flat on a 5 gal pail and over night (each side). This will seal the sidewalls where some slow leaks occur.
    "Someone must have put alcohol in my beer last night." ~ Mr. Richard Baty, Esq.


  7. #7
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    Use three scoops. Youll be good some combos take time and a few rides to fully seaL... sounds normal

  8. #8
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    Thanks a bunch guys. See you guys out there.

  9. #9
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    I just refreshed my sealant and found that there was no actual liquid in the tires anymore. it was still moist, but was spread out along the whole inside of the tire. I just left that there and put a couple scoops in each. After riding yesterday, there was no air loss. i'm sure doing what was stated above will help.
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  10. #10
    saddlemeat
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    I find that a good way to maintain tubeless tires is to inspect the sealant level on a regular basis, like maybe monthy during the riding season. Just pull back a 12" section of bead and that way if it's low top it off right from the jug, which saves messing with valve stems, measuring, or transferring to other containers. Take note of how big the puddle is when you pour in your measured amount, but about a 6" long puddle is good. Carefully ease the bead back in place, inflate, then wipe off any sealant mess. Inflate to ~35 lbs to force the bead into the bead socket well, then adjust lower when you are ready to ride. I have found that just spinning the wheels for a few minutes on the stand distributes the sealant very well, based on my testing. I am using homebrew sealant, the WSS formula, and find it seals much quicker than anything else I've tried.
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  11. #11
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    I found inspection/cleaning of stan's is needed every 10-12MOS. Tubeless is downright mandatory in the land of enchantment and it also will help to shed some unnecessary LBS from your wheels. I dropped a pound from each wheel when i removed the puncture-resistant tubes and went to stans. As mentioned before, takes a few days to seal, but after that your'e good.

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  12. #12
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    My Bontragers have been driving me crazy. Same problems you describe. I think the rimstrips are less than ideal. I've been having problems with leaking out of the base for the valvestem. It is clean, it is tight but not too tight. And it freaking leaks. From a R&D and engineering standpoint, it seems like the valvestem would be an important part to do right. The strips (assymetrical by the way) do not stay where they belong. They ride up the edges and interfere with the tire bead seating in. Right now my rear is holding good. I gave up on the front and put a tube back in it.

    I'm thinking about tossing the rimstrip, running strapping tape around the rim and trying again.

    btw, I've started using Orange Seal tubeless sealant, and it is good stuff.

    dh

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  13. #13
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    Are you wetting the tire bead with a spray bottle of soapy water before airing it up? You should also air the tire up to about 45psi. You should hear two good pinging "pops" as the bead seats into the rim - one "pop" per side. (Don't air it up too much though, or you will hear a much louder POP as the tire blows off the rim (not good)). Then drop the pressure down to your desired ride spec.

    dh
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  14. #14
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    toss the rimstrips and take a trip down to lowes for some 1" gorilla tape. the stem is not the issue, rather the sealing around the spoke nipples
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  15. #15
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    Yeah I just went tubeless using 1" Gorilla tape, Maxxis Minions on 28mm wide rims and I really like it so far. The Gorilla tape is only $3 at Walmart and there is a really good tutorial online on going tubeless with Gorilla tape. Wheels feel lighter and grippier. I am running 35 psi because Stan's recommends that you do not go over 40 psi. And if you go under 30 psi you could burp the tire more often. I've also read that you could inject the Stan's or whatever you are using through removable core presta valve stems rather than unseat the bead to add fluid. No need for a compressor, co2 does the trick. So far so good but it has only been a couple of weeks.

  16. #16
    saddlemeat
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    ^You will never know what is going on in your tire without looking, and you won't know how much sealant to add or when. Be careful with co2, it will coagulate your sealant. Take Stans advice with a grain of salt too, it applies only to Stans rims and tires, which do not use the ubiquitous ust bead and rim seat profiles that almost everyone else uses. I run 20 psi in front and 22 psi rear with no problems. I'll bet in 5 years you will be doing it the same easy simple way too.

    This is a pretty good article: Trail Tech: Tubeless Tips - BikeRadar
    Last edited by bsieb; 04-14-2013 at 07:18 AM.
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by ATXZJ View Post
    toss the rimstrips and take a trip down to lowes for some 1" gorilla tape. the stem is not the issue, rather the sealing around the spoke nipples
    There may be other issues, but the base of the valve stem is a chronic problem area. I hear it, and it makes bubbles when sprayed with the soapy water. I check it, clean it tighten, loosen, wiggle and twist it, and it still a problem.
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  18. #18
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    Riding tubeless in Albuquerque

    Did you try to replace the valve stems with new or a different brand?
    "Someone must have put alcohol in my beer last night." ~ Mr. Richard Baty, Esq.


  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by LCdaveH View Post
    There may be other issues, but the base of the valve stem is a chronic problem area. I hear it, and it makes bubbles when sprayed with the soapy water. I check it, clean it tighten, loosen, wiggle and twist it, and it still a problem.
    I was given the tip to apply a dab of Pedro's grease over the valve rubber stop prior to insertion. The compression + grease has done the trick for me..

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by MTBNate View Post
    Did you try to replace the valve stems with new or a different brand?
    I'm using the recommended Bonty stem (with the black rubber o-ring). I tried a different stem, and it was worse.

    Right now the back is working ok. It is a pesky but intermittent problem.
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by MTB ABQ View Post
    I was given the tip to apply a dab of Pedro's grease over the valve rubber stop prior to insertion. The compression + grease has done the trick for me..
    Cool. I'll try that, along with the gorilla tape.

    Basically, I think the Bonty rimstrips are (s)crap.
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  22. #22
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    There is a tipping point when the tubeless just aint worth it any more.

    I run higher psi then most people. Normally I run tubeless. I still pinch flat and cut the tires. When this happens I just throw a tube in.

    I don't bother going back to tubeless until I buy another tire. I don't believe the advantages are that great. If i already have a tube in there leftover from a trail side fix its just not worth my effort to switch it. If I'm putting on a new tire then ill go for it.

    Also for anyone doing tubeless or not an air compressor from harbor freight can be had for the price of a schwallbe tire. Its worth having around the house.

  23. #23
    saddlemeat
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    I have found that there is no substitute for a true UST rim when it comes to convenience. I find the 949 schrader stems to be the most trouble free for me. You usually will have to grind or file off some of the lip that's inside the rim but they are handy and durable and more functional IMO. I had to drill my rims stem hole to schrader (5/16"), very simple.
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by LCdaveH View Post
    There may be other issues, but the base of the valve stem is a chronic problem area. I hear it, and it makes bubbles when sprayed with the soapy water. I check it, clean it tighten, loosen, wiggle and twist it, and it still a problem.
    That is strange. When i have that issue, 99.99% of the time the tape is allowing air to pass around the spoke nipple and into the core of the rim.
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by bsieb View Post
    ^You will never know what is going on in your tire without looking, and you won't know how much sealant to add or when. Be careful with co2, it will coagulate your sealant. Take Stans advice with a grain of salt too, it applies only to Stans rims and tires, which do not use the ubiquitous ust bead and rim seat profiles that almost everyone else uses. I run 20 psi in front and 22 psi rear with no problems. I'll bet in 5 years you will be doing it the same easy simple way too.

    This is a pretty good article: Trail Tech: Tubeless Tips - BikeRadar
    Thanks for the tip bseib, good point about inspecting the innards of your tire.

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