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Thread: Chupacabras

  1. #1
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    Chupacabras

    Only 6 weeks away, so may as well get all the 'fraid-I'm-gonna-get-shot-by-gangstas posts aired out, so the discussion can distill down to worthwhile issues, like logistics and the new course, as time draws near.

    As I understand it, the Asphyxia climb (as well as the subsequent descent) is being replaced by new singletrack. I heard fourth-hand today that, in an effort to get it bedded in, the new part of the course was raced last week in the opposite direction, and included some suthin NMicans..

    Any insights regarding the new course would be appreciated.



    "No safer place on earth than Chupa on race day." (Me)

  2. #2
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    Follow up to my own post:

    Anyone who's interested can go to

    http://chupacabras100km.com/index.ph...d=221&Itemid=4

    to download a Google Earth style map of the new course. Comparing that to last year's, it's obvious that the Asphyxia loop has been replaced by 3 smaller ones.



    "No safer place on earth than Chupa on race day." (Me)

  3. #3
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    One more thing:

    As I understand it, a Passport, Pass Card (wallet-sized passport) or Enhanced Drivers License (whatever that is) is now required for land travel between Mexico and the US.

    D/L's, birth certificates, etc., are no longer acceptable forms of ID when re-entering the US.

    (2 more)

    Do not drive into Mexico to pick up your packet or on race day. It'll take you longer to drive back into the US than it will to ride the course.


    "No safer place on earth than Chupa on race day." (Me)

  4. #4
    Hey, wait up!
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    Bicycle mounted bulletproof armor shield system



    I'm not skeered of the race day - but influential family members advise me I will not be participating in the race due to their concerns about the violence and gun stuff.

    To me personally, the bigger issue is the hassle of going over and back across the border. I hate bureaucratic fuss.


    Luckily, there is this fine endurance event also in October:

    In best Klingon voice: Today is a good day to ride!

    New Mexico Off Road Series

    Dirt Rocks!

    Let Go, and Let Bike.

  5. #5
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    [QUOTE=LCdaveH
    Luckily, there is this fine endurance event also in October:

    QUOTE]

    Not fine enough to justify its own thread?

  6. #6
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    [QUOTE=Garson]
    Quote Originally Posted by LCdaveH
    Luckily, there is this fine endurance event also in October:

    QUOTE

    Not fine enough to justify its own thread?
    All in due course.
    In best Klingon voice: Today is a good day to ride!

    New Mexico Off Road Series

    Dirt Rocks!

    Let Go, and Let Bike.

  7. #7
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    Ok...............I guess i was one of two people that I knew that went, I had a GREAT PRIMO TIME!!! Unfortunatly there were less riders than other years, I was told approx 1,400 riders vrs the over 2,200 last year. I asked several of the race officiakls that I know( I've been going to race or volunteer every year since 2001) and they felt it was two things: A. the economyt kept far away competitors from comming; B. the FEAR that the press has done such a great job to instill into the public. I don't watch the news, it makes me crazy!!! if I listen to it all I need to FEAR the WMD, dynamite carrying terrorists (in Dona Ana???), gun carrying killers, guncarrying carjackers, drug cartels, and on and on and on!!!! (My opinion only). I got far more of a possibility of darn paint taggers comming by than the terroists!!! If I watch CNN I'd end up staying home inder the bed due to all the crap out there just waiting to "Get Me"!!!
    I think some folks didn't come from the states cause they didn't have a passport. I "tight $$ times" to spend $60 on a passport for one race a year, some folks probably thought about not getting a passport.
    I happen to agree with Garson: "No safer place on earth than Chupa on race day." The opinon of all the race oficials I talked to was that the drug cartel people are out there killing each other they don't hang with mtnbikers.
    The race (as always) was run very well, tons of volunteers, soldiers, policemen. Scouts, etc, were out there on the course helping everyone. I will admit I saw more rifle carrying soldiers and more police all over the place than any other year. Was I scared.........hell NO!!! I had a GREAT TIME!!! Since my astham had been kicking my butt and I couldn't train for the race of the "Paseo"; I only rode from the start to the Cristo and back and stopped along the way to take lots of pics. I had tons of fun!!! EVERYONE out there was yelling encouragement, clapping and supporting all the riders as they do every year. What was there to be afraid of? If I want to be afraid I can go to one or two neighborhoods in ANY town (even La Cruz) and yes I run a higher risk of getting mugged/shot etc. But like the folks that live in Juarez said, they don't go "hang out' in those sections of town. Remember the people who volunteer and organize the race LIVE in Juarez!!!

    Ok enough of my rant. Those of you who didn't go you missed out!! Glad you stayed home nice and safe (as the press would have us believe), watching CNN and Rush etc, Me and about 1,400 others had a GREAT TIME. See you next year Chupacabras!!! This slow old man will return to go race and have fun!!
    Training on Hills Builds Character, That's How I Got To Be One!

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    Bad Religion

    I don't know? There is something detracting about riding my bike around cops, soldiers, and guns regardless of where it is at.

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    This whole issue of Chubacabras being conducted in an atmosphere of violence has become such a bunch of complete horseshit that it's not even worth responding to anymore.

    Hell, aside from the border crossing, in both directions, and the ones that the traffic-control cops were naturally wearing, I didn't see a single weapon all day. What's more, I saw twice as many at the checkpoint on I-25. What a freakin' joke. Everybody boycotting Walgreens now, too?

    You people live in places like N. NM, where a kid gets thrown off the Rio Grande Gorge Bridge by a couple of pricks for the wheels on his car, and in places like Alb., where countless bikes are ripped off every day. Meanwhile, I can leave my bike laying on the ground 100 yds. away, with thousands of people milling about, while I go catch a free massage, and never give it a second thought. The only thing that anyone has to fear from the people of Juarez during their Chupacabras experience is being exposed to more outright human kindness than most gringos ever knew existed.

    I can't imagine how self-absorbed you'd have to be, not to be overwhelmed by the scope and the personality of that production. The attitude of every single one of the hundreds of volunteers that are a part of the event is nothing short of phenomenal. It's a freakin' avalanche of community involvement, and a matter of very intense civic pride.

    In fact, the only thing that's ever going to be wrong with this 100K event is that it only happens once a year. That's not to say that what always promises to be an adventure can't turn out to be your worst-ever day on a bike, but that'd be the result of your failure to manage your own issues.

    And as far as needing a passport is concerned, that has nothing to do with Chupacabras. Sure, if you've already made up your mind that for the rest of your life, your never going to leave the United States, then I suppose you can make the argument that no single bike race in the world is worth the hassle of getting a passport/card. On the other hand, when you figure that for a $30 entry fee, you can have 2 days of free live music, free food and drinks, and an awesome jersey to the first 650 men and all the women finishers, and you compare that with what you get for a buck in NM, it seems to me that you're getting your passport for free. And all this without even taking in consideration that your participating in what has to be the best supported, best organized bike race you'll ever be qualified to participate in, and in as festive an atmosphere as you'll ever see.

    So, yeah, until you can get over your self-aggrandizing Norte Americano hypocrisy, and just admit that it's really the 100km course and/or getting your ass kicked by several hundred Mexicans that keeps you at bay, you probably should stay home, since exposure to that much positive energy is only going to make you feel even more insignificant than that rotgut cable news you spend hours suckling every day.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garson
    This whole issue of Chubacabras being conducted in an atmosphere of violence has become such a bunch of complete horseshit that it's not even worth responding to anymore.

    I just flew back to Indianapolis from the race this weekend and couldnt agree more with this statement. I flew down on the 3rd and spent a week with my friend and his family before the race and went out pre riding the trails during the week. Everyone I ran into was friendly and helpful, it was probally the best trip I ever had in my life to be honest. In the 10 days I was living in Juarez I saw ZERO crime and felt 100% safe. A lot of respect to Carlos Willis and Senor Oreyes for organizing this fine event!

    I will be posing a complete write up to post to the site in a few days along with pictures.
    Bikes: 2008 Cannondale Rush 4, 1994 Trek 930SHX, 2009 Scott CR1 Team Issue

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    Bro' garson said it for ME!! AGREE with you!! been to many a race of different types and the Chpacabras and the Ironman in Hawaii are the bestest!! Most fun and most volunteeres and where the entire community goes all out to support the race!!
    One of the neatest things about the Chupa is the different types of people and bikes that are out there having one hell-uva-great time!!! Theyride in street shoes, tennies, long sweat pants and grey sweatshirt, in work gloves or no gloves, on every kind of mtn bike ever made!! The Murrays, Nexts, Pacifics, etc all the way up to the Sevens, carbon fiber anythings and everythings, high $$$ and low $$$ bikes and EVERYONE having a hell-uva-great time!! True many are underttrained and DNF but they don't care, they are out there to enjoy the bike ride and race experience.
    One also gets a little humility going thru the very poor neighborhoods and seeing real poverty, makes one be a little bit more grateful for whatever we have.
    GOD bless alll the Cupacabras volunteers and racers!!
    Training on Hills Builds Character, That's How I Got To Be One!

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by IRONMAN1518
    One also gets a little humility going thru the very poor neighborhoods and seeing real poverty, makes one be a little bit more grateful for whatever we have.
    GOD bless alll the Cupacabras volunteers and racers!!
    One of my greatest experiences of the race was after getting caught in accident at 3km into the race and getting dropped by my team I never really got caught back up, but returing from Cristo going down Paty's though the hood section, I was totally alone, (in about 600 place at that point, and feeling disapointed in my performance). There was about 10 5-7 year old kids out in the street watching the race, seeing me the only one comming by they were yelling "animal" and giving me thumbs up and slapping high 5's to me like I was Lance Armstrong comming by them.

    To them it didnt matter and they though it was the coolest thing they have seen, in retrospect my bike probally cost more than their make shift house with cardboard walls and scrap sheet metal roof. Really put things in perspective. Looking back I whish I had taken a picture of them but at that point I really just wanted to be finsihed with the race.
    Bikes: 2008 Cannondale Rush 4, 1994 Trek 930SHX, 2009 Scott CR1 Team Issue

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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by IRONMAN1518
    ....One of the neatest things about the Chupa is the different types of people and bikes that are out there having one hell-uva-great time!!! ....
    ... and, as much of a departure as it is from the usual mtb race environment, it's that broad base of participation that gets so many spectators out there before/during/after the race, and lets all of us enjoy celebrity status for a day. Regardless of who they came out to see, they cheer just as big for everyone, and slapping those rows of tiny hands as I go through the poor part of town is always a highlight for me.

    In previous years, we've just taken our place at the back, where you see the sweatsuits and rubber-ducky horns on handlebars. This year we got a hookup in the first few hundred, and it was nothing but glaring eyeballs, and we were riding 20mph within 30 sec. instead of taking 3 min. to get to the start line after the gun.

    Although I knew I'd ridden the first 27 mi. almost 2mph faster than last year, I was still amazed that there was no sign of those couple hundred bikes that I usually pass in the first 5-mile climb that follows. I was 15 min. ahead of last year's pace at 36 mi., when my seatpost broke, and during the eternity that it took me to get going again, I probably lost at least 100 places, and although I rode flat out for the 8 miles to King Kong, I still had to endure the pain of fighting my way through a few dozen beginner types on the first new section of singletrack.

    Although riders finish continuously at the rate of about 50 every 8-9 min., it's probably the first 500, or so, that are solid sport-class or better mtb racers, and I'd imagine there are probably 1000 that figure they have a real shot at a jersey. While I only managed to finish a couple places higher this year, that was in spite of a major mechanical that I thought for sure was going to result in a 30-mile walk to the finish.

    Some people may think of this course as something of a lollipop because of the long flat stretches, but because it gives riders of lesser mtb skills the chance to ride fast early on, and especially because of the addition of the new singletrack sections throughout the middle, if, for whatever reason, you're not where you hope to be in the pack by 38 miles, you're going to be at a big disadvantage. So, as a result of the numbers and the course layout, if you came to race for the best possible finish, an effective strategy needs to begin at the start and end at the finish, and that can really add to the length of the race.

  14. #14
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    Sounds like fun. We'll have to go for it next year. I'm sure there were plenty of Tecates & Pacificos consumed pre, during, & post-race.

  15. #15
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    Resultados:


    http://www.chupacabras100km.com/docs...cabras2009.pdf

    Not sure when the finish chute got backed up, but by the time we got there, times, which are recorded at the end of the chute, were off by as much as 15 min. If you want an accurate time at Chupa, take a watch. Upside is, by the time you leave the finish chute, you've already got all your toys and plenty of free rehydration.

    First New Mexican appears to be Ken "gonna pump you up" Gauthier in 79th place.

    Second New Mexican appears to be James Love in 98th, a member of our Love/Mercer gang, which counted 8 riders this year, including 2 adopted orphans.

    Poor Javier appears to be left out of the results for the second year in a row, and I'll testify that he finished 2 places ahead of me.

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