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Thread: Chupacabras

  1. #1
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    Chupacabras

    Cover me. I'm goin' in.

    After the last 4 weekends, common sense was prevailing, but too many good friends have come too far not to drag my tired butt out for one more day of crazy fun in the sun. Definitely more concerned about how long my butt will last than taking a round in it.

    Maybe if enough folks stay away, it won't take me till 4 minutes after the gun goes off to get to the start line this year.

  2. #2
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    Chupacabras

    Garson,
    I got your back I've been there 4 times to race and to volunteer the last three years. It is indeed a great and well organised race. And I've been to a few in my time. They have the police stopping traffic, lots of soldiers, Boy and Girl Scouts and tons of people along the way. We (as people and riders) don't need to let FEAR dominate us. CNN and the politicians do enough of that. (But enough from my soapbox).
    I'll be @ the registration on friday (I help translate) and I'll be ridding the 50 km on sat.
    Darn drug dealers and their insanity ain't keeping me from racing @ a great race!!
    Been racin' tooo long!
    Training on Hills Builds Character, That's How I Got To Be One!

  3. #3
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    I aint scared

    I ride to work every day in Juarez. Have'nt been shot yet.

    This will be my second year to ride Chupa. Better prepared this year, looking for a great day. Hope Norbert doesn't show up till after I finish. I don't like rain and like wind even less.

    CHOOOOOOOPA!!

    ANEEEEEEEEEEMATE!!!!

  4. #4
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    No kidding, Ironman. No safer place on earth than the Chupa course on race day. Although, you might start to wonder during that last 10 miles when you can start to feel very much alone in the middle of nowhere.

    I'll look for you tomorrow. We'll be (one of) the rowdy bunch of gringos on bikes, most of whom speak fluent Spanish.

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    Paseo de las Cabras 50 Km report

    I just love this name, Paseo kinda means, stroll, wandering, easy ride, etc. And most of the 50 Km Paseo was easy/flat. THE bad news nooooooooo it was not 50 km, (31 miles), it was more like 42 miles. The uphill portion to the Black Christ statue is rideable except (for me) the short "Paty's Uphill" section, but no biggie. THE biggie was losing my rear shock seal and all the air comming out oh crap!! And this was just before the climb starts! Yes the tiny thought of:"Oh goody, I can quit now" did run thru my little head, but pride came in to remind me been doing this racing thing toooo long (road since -82, mtn since '95)and only had one DNF Sooooo went looking for a stick to jam in front of the shock and one of the volunteers was helping me. Folks at the aid station were looking for a giant channellocks so I could undo the nut and try to re-insert the seal, and several folks tried to unscrew it by hand to no avail. One fellow rider stopped racing and offered me a foot air pump to try to air it back up but the seal would not hold air. That's the kind of race this is people helping people have fun ridding mtnbikes!
    (All of a sudden, out of no where my homie El Johhny from Crazy Cat Cycelry was on the scene to help me We got it going and I continued on and finished!!
    As usual this race is FUN!!! The number of volunteers, police support, Boy and Girl Scouts and just plain folks out there cheering EVERYONE ON!! (not just the front runners), makes this race a HAPPENING!! Little kids reach out their hands so the riders give them a Hi 5, spectators are yelling:"Si se puede" (Yes you can), waving noisemakers, and there are fans alll over the whole course just yelling and encouraging all the riders.
    I had fun for sure though my butt felt the change from FS to HT, which left me wondering
    how'd I ride a HT for so long??
    Got to see old friends that I only see once a year here, the volunteers and organizers and some racers, and met new folks from all over, to include Garson.
    Had a GASS!! GREAT race!! I'll be back!!
    Training on Hills Builds Character, That's How I Got To Be One!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by IRONMAN1518
    ... Sooooo went looking for a stick to jam in front of the shock ....
    Just rolled in after a solid weekend of good times, but I gotta take the time to say, my group (including 3 engineers) was totally impressed with that splint job on your shock when we saw it in the parking lot. You owe it to yourself to post a picture of it - especially since you finished the race on it. That's some bigtime determination.

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    Shock Splint

    Hey Garson and company!! it was indeed a pleasure to meet you all!!

    Thanks for the kind words. I too an engeneer, but retarded now! When I raced motorcycles had to learn to do "fixups" on the trail, and many a fixup in many places I worked and around the house. The old Boy Scout motto "Be Prepared" is great.
    Plus, I'd seen pics of people doing similar on the trail so I knew it could be done, no biggie, just finding the "right" stick!! A very kind volunteer @ the race found the "right" one!!
    See you all @ the next 50 km!
    Training on Hills Builds Character, That's How I Got To Be One!

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    Recipe for a great Chupacabras:

    Plan to spend practically every waking moment for 3 days with a bunch of good friends just to make sure your heart's in the right place.

    Then:

    1) Don't be a nutball that drives across the border. Ride your bikes across for both packet pick-up and race day. Return trip is 20 min by bike, up to 3 hours by car.
    2) Don't waste energy worrying about where you are in the pack at the start line. Get in some place where your group can easily take turns coming and going before the start. It seems like an eternity, but it'll only be a few minutes after the gun that you can ride at full speed.
    3) Spend the first 27 miles cruising at the average speed/heart rate typical of a 60-70 mile training ride on the road (on an mtb, of course);
    4) Relax as you start passing literally hundreds of riders during the next 14 miles of rolling ascent to the first short hike-a-bike;
    5) Put your game face on for the next 7 miles and prepare to deal with a) all the people in front of you who won't be able to navigate the rivers of gravel without fouling up everyone behind them, b) the increasing number of increasingly tired riders that are walking up tight, twisty climbs, and will not, no matter how many times you yell, "Piste", give you room to ride by and c) the increasing number of riders that are content to ride in increasingly long pace lines that require you to pass them, all at once, uphill, off the singletrack, through rocks and cactus;
    6) Get a grip during the 2nd hike-a-bike where you're going to spend a good 1/2 hour climbing over boulders to the tune of 500 vertical feet in less than 2/3 of a mile because a) you're about to find out how close you are to cramping if you're not careful what you do with your legs b) you're going to need to keep your cool when some loco Mexicana starts running her bike into the back of your legs because she wants to get around you, although it's clear that you're hiking 6 inches behind the guy in front of you, who's 6 inches behind the guy in front of him, and so on, for as far as the eye can see. and c) you really need to convince yourself that you can and will do a much better job than last year on the steep, gnarly one-mile descent that starts right off the top of the hike.
    7) Don't be afraid to give away your CO2 injector to someone that needs it when you think you're home free, because, as one of my friends found out, when you do have a flat with 4 miles to go, someone else will stop and give you theirs. Chupakarma.

    For good measure, thank your lucky stars when:

    1) The skies are overcast.
    2) Totally unlike last year, the only rider in front of you that wasn't easily passed on the twisty singletrack through the countless gravel crossings, set such a great pace for you that you felt compelled to congratulate him when the trail finally widened into 2-track. This is the stuff of Chupacabras, and you'll remember each other when you meet somewhere on the trail next year.
    3) You really did bomb down the gnarly one-mile descent.
    4) Unlike last year, and as a result of better pacing, hydration, etc., bonking was nowhere in sight and cramps were almost non-existent, allowing you to not only lay down a solid pace for the last 13 miles, but also celebrate the obvious with every rider you encountered along the way. If you're still racing at this point, you're probably either in the top 100 or bashing it out with your best friend, because everyone else is too busy shouting encouragment - to the point of slowing down to give others the chance to tuck in behind them.
    5) You end up with a time that was 20+ minutes faster than last year, about 60 places higher, legs that you can actually walk on and the conviction that it just doesn't get any better than this.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garson
    Recipe for a great Chupacabras:

    ....
    Congratulations!

    I sort of missed doing the Choop this year. But I also sort of enjoyed just kicking it easy close to home.

    Good to hear you had a fun, safe, successful race.

    d/h

  10. #10
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    It was certainly a beautiful day. No wind, very little rain.

    I had a blast, except for cramping ALOT climbing asfixia. Thought I'd never make it. Lost two hours on that dam climb. Reached the top and a quick mini-massage and stretch and down we went.

    To everyone who was worried about the gangsters, keep in mind, nowhere safer to be than surrounded by thousands of cyclists all out to have as much fun as the next guy. It really was a great day.

    Boy, are my legs sore.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by LCdaveH
    .. I sort of missed doing the Choop this year. ...
    We missed you too, Dave. Since we base in Cruces for Chupa, you should expect to hear banging on your door at 6AM next year. Heck, how many times do you get to see Smokin' Ray on a 9-speed (1 chainring) ?

  12. #12
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    Thanks for keeping it alive.Juarez is a great town,and chupacabra is a great race.
    and YES the currrent messed up violence did affect my decision not to attend. Perhaps in 009 ....

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Garson
    a) all the people in front of you who won't be able to navigate the rivers of gravel without fouling up everyone behind them, b) the increasing number of increasingly tired riders that are walking up tight, twisty climbs, and will not, no matter how many times you yell, "Piste", give you room to ride by and c) the increasing number of riders that are content to ride in increasingly long pace lines that require you to pass them, all at once, uphill, off the singletrack, through rocks and cactus;
    6) Get a grip during the 2nd hike-a-bike where you're going to spend a good 1/2 hour climbing over boulders to the tune of 500 vertical feet in less than 2/3 of a mile because a) you're about to find out how close you are to cramping if you're not careful what you do with your legs b) you're going to need to keep your cool when some loco Mexicana starts running her bike into the back of your legs because she wants to get around you, although it's clear that you're hiking 6 inches behind the guy in front of you, who's 6 inches behind the guy in front of him, and so on, for as far as the eye can see.
    Sounds like lotsa fun.... Makes me we want to try dropping a big rock on my head.

  14. #14
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    Stick-Fix for Chupacabras 50km Race.

    This the fix that I did with the help of my homie El Johnny from El Paso and a volunteer @ one of the aid stations @ mile 28 (on my speedo). Since I've ridden the 100 km course and know how difficult/trying/challenging it is I know the feeling of acomplishment one gets from finishing THIS race. The 50km was a fun course, and the spectators cheering eveyone along the way is a real HAPPENING!! If you don't ever do any race at least go and watch this race sometime. WAAAAAYYY too much fun!!
    Never mind the CNN bs about murders/drug dealers etc, etc, just like others have said it is safe. You want drugs and murders hell for some people just stay home.
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  15. #15
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    Sounds like a good time...shoot, I can barely drive 50km before I get tired! Maybe next year I will volunteer and years to follow I may pop my 50km cherry at the Chupa.

    Great report Garson, the season is over good job Time to hit the local trails hard, eh? The Bandoleros have a forward position available .

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mtn. Biker123
    ... The Bandoleros have a forward position available .
    Is the forward position reclining?

  17. #17
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    Yep! But YOU have to carry the beer! ....and try not to spill it
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    100K Results ...

    Field was smaller this year, but a lot stronger.

    This year, I was just shy of 20 min faster - 63 places higher. Last year I'd have finished 114 places higher with this year's time!

    This year, I'd have finished 575th with my last year's time, instead of last year's 509th. Wow!

    No more Mr Niceguy.

    That's with 1107 finishers this year vs. 1383 finishers last year.

    The 50K this year is obviously responsible for the reduction in the number of finishers for the 100K. There were a lot more good riders this year.

    My group:

    118 Caleb Hanson Masculino 26 Albuquerque EUA 5:25:04
    167 John Robert Mercer Masculino 38 Chandler EUA 5:35:44
    185 James Love Masculino 37 Seattle EUA 5:40:31
    446 Robert Cipoletti Masculino 57 Albuquerque EUA 6:31:50
    647 Donald Bean Mercer Masculino 24 Las Cruces EUA 7:05:11
    726 Deana Mercer Femenino 34 Alburquerque EUA 7:28:15

    Other friends and people I kinda know:

    102 Ken Gauthier Masculino 51 Albuquerque EUA 5:20:03
    (Ken was 6 min faster this year, and only moved up ONE place)
    130 Karen R Rishel Masculino 44 Las Cruces EUA 5:29:11
    131 Alan C Rishel Masculino 48 Las Cruces EUA 5:29:16
    268 Raymond Padilla Masculino 47 Las Cruces EUA 6:00:53

    http://chupacabras100km.com/docs/res...rales_2008.pdf

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