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Thread: Parts upgrade

  1. #1
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    Parts upgrade

    I'm trying to figure out if upgrading to better handlebar, stem and seatpost makes any sense. I know they can be expensive but do I realy get lighter parts and do they realy make any difference? Or should I stick with what came on my Fantom 29PRO?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Robson13
    I'm trying to figure out if upgrading to better handlebar, stem and seatpost makes any sense. I know they can be expensive but do I realy get lighter parts and do they realy make any difference? Or should I stick with what came on my Fantom 29PRO?
    How heavy is your bike now? If you plan to race (a lot), you may want to think about upgrading but in my (humble) opinion, going lighter on those parts is a waste of money. The bike as configured is not really set up for racing. You could spend your money elsewhere and get better value.

    If you are thinking about hucking off the side of a mountain, and are looking to upgrade to stronger (thus heavier) parts, then that is another story. To be honest though, that bike is really not set up to take a lot of abuse.
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    I'm doing a lot of technical rides, lots of rocks and etc. but nothing crazy. I'm not racing and probably never will. I was just wondering why so many people upgrade those parts. I guess this only make sense if you want to shave off some weight for racing.

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    The stock weight of this bike is around 31lbs. Those stock parts on the Fantom you asked about are fairly heavy, to the point that you could easily lose over a quarter of a pound by upgrading them. And a good upgrade to these can actually be both lighter and stronger, such as a Thomson seatpost.

    But.. that money isn't necessarily worth it when you could put it towards saving for lighter and higher quality wheels, for example. You would definitely notice a difference there as a lighter wheelset accelerates quicker.

    In the meantime, don't worry about it too much You have a good bike that should be able to handle many miles of rough trails. Most of the major components are good mid-level parts that may be a bit heavier than the fancier stuff but should be plenty durable. Especially that fork; the Tora is a tough mother of a fork and very stiff (I have one and I love it). I think Steve must be using a different standard for "a lot of abuse". I doubt you bought this bike to take 4' drops and such.

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    If you are looking to lose weight, the cockpit (bars, stem seatpost) is the worst place to start because you don't get much bang for your buck. You may save 0.25 pounds, but it won't even be noticeable at all when riding, and will set you back up to a few hundered dollars depending on what type you get.

    The first place to lose weight is always reciprocating parts. This is where weight loss is felt the most while riding because lighter parts in motion accelerate faster and change direction faster. So look at tires and tubes first. A lot of stock bikes come with wire bead tires, switching to the exact same tire in a kevlar bead will save a nice bit of weight. Wheels can be expensive, but a nice light set will make your bike feel much faster especially on a 29er.
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    Great input! Thanks a lot. I think I save my money toward second bike.

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    Quote Originally Posted by boomn
    I doubt you bought this bike to take 4' drops and such.
    Given the OP didnt really say too much about himself, or what style of riding he was doing why would you doubt that? It is quite possible, given the bike he purchased ie. has a "mother of a fork" and 29" wheels.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robson13
    Great input! Thanks a lot. I think I save my money toward second bike.
    Just ride the snot out of your bike and don't worry too much about the details. Eventually, you will figure our what style of riding you like and possibly decide you will need a dedicated bike best suited to that purpose.

    I think a lot of people like to upgrade just because of the bling factor (I am guilty as charged!!). Ride until it is either broken or worn out. Then if you want to upgrade to lighter/stronger/sexier part, then the extra wont cost wont break the bank. As others have stated, the wheels/tires are the first place to look at. Can be expensive, but certainly the best bang for your buck. Stem/bars/seatpost are the last thing I would ever upgrade.

    The bike you bought is an awesome first-time bike that can be used to ride almost anything. Enjoy
    It's only pain......

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