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  1. #1
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    New to the MTB world.

    Hey all. moved to Northern GA only to find a new addiction hitting the trails here,
    I just purchased a 700DS like others here on e-bay and a lot of homework.
    I didn't have the money for some of the extravagant bikes, and am anxiously awaiting
    for the bike to arrive on Wed. Got tools and table all laid out in the garage

    My question is this:
    • I am 6'4' 245lbs and am a rather large frame. I have found a few
      articles stating that the stock Rims are not that great for Trail riding over roots and other
      rocks etc.


    I went with the 700DS for Price and my other bike is a 2003 GT Aggressor 3.0. Which
    is basically a XC bike from what I can tell. I have destroyed 3 back Rims on this bike.
    I assume quite a bit is my riding technique (or lack there of) Is there a really strong rim
    out there that could just take murderous abuse from the down forces my size will generate?

    • I also see many of you posting about the stock 800lb load on the Spring:
      What should someone my size be looking for in retention? 600lbs? or is there a mathematical
      formula I can compute for this?


    Thanks in advance for any advice!

  2. #2
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    As far as wheels for your weight, you should ask in the Clydesdale forum. The guys there will have a much better idea what you need.
    2012 On One Whippet 650b
    2012 Santa Cruz TRc 650b
    2014 On One Dirty Disco
    2010 Soma Groove
    1987 Haro RS1

  3. #3
    Bushwacker
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    I'm 6'5" 220lbs now although when I bought my 700 I was just a shade under 240lbs. Other than a loose spoke that I simply tightened up, I've never had any problems with either wheel. They seem as solid and true as the day I got the bike.
    Given my size, there were two glaring issues that needed to be tweaked for me. The first, as you know, is the rear shock. I went with a 650 lb spring which is OK but I probably could have gone with a 600, maybe a 550. I would say a 650 would be right for you. That will be a $15 to $30 investment. If you can slap down $200, give or take, an air shock is a better alternative and reportedly gives you more suspension travel. Given your weight tho I'd double check with the shock manufacturer to make sure a particular shock would work with your weight. The 700 frame design is more prone to pedal bob so a lockout is a good option to have ( that's the one feature I do like about the Kindshock Axis that's on the bike now and I use it all the time on long up hill grinds). I got my spring on ebay but the right fit is hard to find. Someone posted around here a retail place to buy a spring, if you look around you should find it, maybe http://www.bikeparts.com/search_resu...lcategory=1388
    Issue #2 for me was, given my height, I run my seat very high which brings me a little too forward on the steeps. I swapped out the stock stem for this http://www.amazon.com/Delta-Alloy-Bi.../dp/B000FHBED0. Now I have more control on those nasty down hill sections. You're a little shorter than me so it might not be an issue with you.
    At 245, you may find the Dart springs a little too soft, it's acceptable for me. Those can be swapped out for stiffer springs for not many $'s. The Dart 2 is a lower end shock and will serve you fine for trail roots, small rocks etc. but for larger rocks, drops etc you'd need a higher end fork to carry any speed through that type of terrain.
    IMO these are the items that need immediate consideration. You'll see, around here, various other upgrades riders have done for their own personal preference.
    Since the spring dimension question keeps coming up I located the measurements I took and here they are:

    OD diameter: 45mm or 1 3/4"

    Length: 95mm or 4 3/4 "

    ID: 30mm or 1 3/16 "

    Piston travel: 1.5 "
    When I'm not windsurfing, I'm mountain biking

  4. #4
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    awesome

    Thanks Guys! That's great info, I don't "plan" on doing any drops until I learn how to ride the bike the way its meant to be ridden.

    Would the lockout basically turn the bike into a hard tail? I'm just concerned that I would
    want the "play" to minimize damaging the wheel itself and mitigating my poor riding
    technique.

    I will definately heed any and all advice, particularly around the front fork and spring/shock. I'm eyeballing that Cloud9 Hard.
    I guess the bottom line is, I ride trails for now that have roots and small rocks, and some log jumps here and there, I just want my wheels to survive it

    Thanks in advance all, I'm stoked!

  5. #5
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    It's not 2001, which is why lockouts have fallen out of favor. Better suspensions, coupled with better shocks have all but eliminated lockouts from the market.

    Especially at a higher weight as you are, a lockout will only force the frame to accept loads it was not designed to, even on the seemingly smooth pavement undulations, or even static loading under that kind of weight.

    Skip the lockout. What's the point of having suspension if you're not going to use it?

  6. #6
    Bushwacker
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    Quote Originally Posted by enOehT
    Thanks Guys! That's great info, I don't "plan" on doing any drops until I learn how to ride the bike the way its meant to be ridden.

    Would the lockout basically turn the bike into a hard tail? I'm just concerned that I would
    want the "play" to minimize damaging the wheel itself and mitigating my poor riding
    technique.

    I will definately heed any and all advice, particularly around the front fork and spring/shock. I'm eyeballing that Cloud9 Hard.
    I guess the bottom line is, I ride trails for now that have roots and small rocks, and some log jumps here and there, I just want my wheels to survive it

    Thanks in advance all, I'm stoked!
    Yes, lockout does just that, it locks the suspension from moving.
    From the research I've done, the 700 has a single pivot design where the rear wheel travel does not move on a vertical path like some of the newer frame designs. So, the 700 is more prone to peddle "bob", particularly when you are grinding up a long hill. Some of the newer shocks/forks have a motion control feature that helps eliminate or reduce the "bob" movement. I don't know if even the newest motion control technology would completely eliminate "bob" on the 700 design. If you want to try that technology, great, but get ready to fork over some serious cash for a high end fork and shock and if you do that, you probably should have spent more on a higher end bike to begin with, IMO.

    I use the lockout on both the front and back when I have a long grind up hill. A place where I ride frequently, you park your car at the top elevation in the park, 2300' or so, and can ride down to around 500'. I work my way around the park till I get to the lowest elvation and then flip on the lockouts and grind it back up at 2-3 mph. If I am on a lot of smaller, up and down hill sections, I don't engage the lockouts. I find I'm more effrecient on the long up hill grinds with the 700 in lockout. BTW, both front and rear do have blow off valves so if you happen to take a hit they will give and then return to lockout. Regular trail riding or down hills are not reccomended in lockout.
    When I'm not windsurfing, I'm mountain biking

  7. #7
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    Great points by all, and I want to thank you for taking the time to answer my questions, the community support just fortifies my desire to ride!

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