Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2
Results 26 to 45 of 45
  1. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    116
    After doing a fair amount of research, I decided to go with the 2.25" RoRos front and rear. While I was tempted by the lightest version, there are enough rocks around here that the Snakeskin version seemed like a prudent choice. It's probably somewhat drier here than in BC (based on the pics/videos I've seen of your trails), so I think they'll work well. They're no heavier than the SB8s and that's light enough for now. Once I build some lighter tubeless wheels, I'll switch them over and that should knock nearly a pound off the bike. If they hold up well, I may be tempted to try something lighter next summer.

  2. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    116

    Follow-up

    The 2.25" Rocket Ron's at 27 psi, along with 85psi in the fork completely transformed the bike. It's now very surefooted, even on loose surfaces and it's exceptionally comfortable. I'll probably bump the rear up to 28 and drop the front to 26 and be done with it. I'm really starting to enjoy this beast!

    BTW, the RoRo Snakeskins only added a total of 12 grams compared to the stock SB8s, so there's essentially no weight penalty.
    Last edited by Bnystrom; 11-24-2013 at 09:52 AM. Reason: additional infromation

  3. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    116

    Resolution to seatpost issue

    I contacted Matt at BD about the seatpost issues. Although he couldn't do anything about the length (I just replaced it with a Thomson post), he worked with me on the slippage issue, which is covered under the warranty. After trying assembly paste, which reduced the slippage but made the bike creak annoyingly, he ultimately suggested using a Surly Constrictor clamp to solve the problem. BD doesn't sell them, but he offered to refund me the cost of one. I ordered the clamp, emailed Matt a copy of the receipt and received a prompt refund. I'm very pleased with this resolution and the problem is solved.

  4. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    85
    I'm loving my XTR 3x10 Fly Ti . What I find strange about your review is that you gained an entire pound of weight. The Thompson post couldn't weigh more than stock and the grip shifters were likely a weight saver while the line swap would make zero difference, so it must be a heavy saddle that you swapped, but 454grams? It doesn't make sense.
    I also had issues with post slippage and destroyed my weight weenie upgrade carbon post. As it slid the seat tube shaved a layer up and caused it too eventually crack. Determined to upgrade, I was told Thompson but ,while very nice, everyone has one so I went with KCNC Scandium post. This thing is awesome at just 146g and has the nice machine grooves all the way up to grip the tube so no sliding issues. I also got a 3T carbon 80mm stem and carbon 660mm bar but await for a wider 720mm bar as my local trails are rocky and rough. I may opt for a shorter stem. I got rid of the saddle and took a gamble on a Selle Italia sl xp, another gram saver but it actually turned out to be comfortable. The tires are great for hardpack and the road to the trail in dry conditions but here on Vancouver island its wet so I got a Maxxis Beaver for the rear which is an extremely good tire for wet conditions and it weighs just 500g! The front got the Rocket Ron which have been pretty good but am looking for something with more confidense on loose corners so ordered a Mountain King 2. Finally, I upgraded the rear wheel for no real reason as the wheels have been very good so far. I bought the unknown Formula(of brake fame not cheap OEM hubs) Volo Light. Its a scandium rim with 24 bladed spokes and a sweet hub. Its designed to handle AM use yet weighs just 865g.I like the rim design as its triangular which is a strong shape and has a nice champagne finish. The hub is a 4 pawl design with 30 POE which feels fine and uses an out board bearing design to better handle loads. There is literally 1 review on this wheel which was positive but still I'm a bit nervous and am hoping the Italians did their home work in designing this thing. I'm really curious as to what it weighs. If you haven't noticed I'm a it of a weight weenie but this is my first ride since the late 90s and then it was all about weight saving because every bike was basicly an XC bike.

  5. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    116
    You forgot that the stock weight does not include pedals. Between the Eggbeaters I installed, the crank boots, the water bottle cage, the seatpost and the saddle, it gained a pound which is what I expected. It now has Stan's crest wheels, ESI grips, a Surly Constrictor seatpost clamp and a 610mm Easton carbon bar (the trails I ride require narrow bars). It weighs 22.2 pounds.

  6. #31
    The perfessor
    Reputation: mr_chrome's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    419
    been riding my Fly Ti 29er for over a year now and here's my quick breakdown.........no real squeaky problems but I'm the type to constantly tweak my bike anyway (Leonard Zinn said he used to mess with his BB after every race to eliminate creaking), but my seatpost slips so I put a quick fix on it (pipe clamp over tape - this seems to work fine so I'll buy a double-clamp for the seatpost this spring)......so there it is - no major problems whatsoever at this point - however, I did build mine from the frame up so its custom from top to bottom.........
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Motobecane FLY Team 29 Titanium after 2 years review.-moto-ht.jpg  

    Trifecta is Perfecta: 26" FSR Geared / 29er SS Rigid / 29er Ti Hardtail Geared

  7. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    116

    Have you contacted BD about the seatpost slipping?

    They may reimburse you for the new seatpost clamp.

    Despite the brutal weather we've had lately, I've been able to get out on mine a few times recently. The more I ride it, the more I appreciate what a fine piece of machinery it is. The harder I push it, the better it feels and the light weight make it much more fun than my porky full-suspension bike.

    I did run into a minor issue with the overly long front brake hose occasionally touching the front tire. I shortened it by ~4" and that problem is eliminated. Now I'm just waiting for warm weather so I can actually bed the brakes in properly; it's just doesn't seem to be possible to do it in cold temps.

    Speaking of the brakes, I thought I'd mention that the bleeding procedure for XX & Elixir brakes is different than for Juicys and similar Avid models. The old procedure doesn't work well with the newer brakes, but the recommended procedure works great. The old-style bleed kit works fine.

  8. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    85
    Well, its been awhile. Got my wider bars, the 720mm. While there are a few close calls with trees, I feel that with the larger wheels, the length helps on really rough terrain to reign in that front wheel. Speaking of the front wheel, I broke it. Went down a steep section that my more experienced friend refused to try. One of those , its so steep that braking just means you go as quick skidding! Anyways, the trail continued off to the right a bit and the direct line went straight into a pile of moss coloured boulders and I hit them dead on flipping in the air landing on my back. Ouch! Thank God for the Camelback. I replaced it with a Hope Hoops Stans Crest(chose weight weenie wheel seeing its the front and don't plan on crashing into rocks anytime soon.)
    Really smooth and light wheel that has stayed true for a couple months now. Oh, and I replaced the RoRo with a Conti MK2 which probably made the biggest improvement yet. The RoRo just is not a BC damp conditions tire. Too bad because its fast and rolls well.
    My only beef with this frame is the seat tube being out of spec. By that I mean its obviously not exactly 27.2 because no post sits in their , they all slide loose and keeping them put is a pain.
    I also had a creak that lead me to overhaul my pedals and crank set/BB to no avail until I remembered someone mention their rear wheel. That was it, just a quick lube at the drop outs and quiet bliss! I cannot stand creaks.
    Actually, quite happy with the FSA Afterburner. Its been stiff and free of issues. Mind you, I did upgrade to Wickwerks rings seeing as I had a triple I figured I'd try out the alleged improved shifting. I'm sold, they have a system with numerous shift ramps vs. say 2 and there is no waiting for the chain to be picked up, its very fast and smooth. This works both up and down, very quick. It likes quick forceful shifting action as opposed to gentle nudging which works for me.
    I also replaced my sweet carbon stem for a shorter cheap 60mm alloy unit. This helps to make it more of a true trail bike and less XC racer which I like about the geo of this frame with the slacker HA and shorter CS. The trails here are very up/down with steep tech bits everywhere.
    The stock XTR and Avid brakes have been awesome. Shimano really took it to another level with 10 speed XTR. Flawless shifting. I remember the old days where the top cogs were a bit laggy because of "light action" springs, and having to fiddle with barrel adjusters, no more. Makes riding fun when you know it will shift even under effort up steep sections. Avid, have really taken a beating with reviews brake wise and the Trail series were their fix, apparently too little too late as now they dropped the name for SRAM and use the same tech as everyone else. I like my Trail 9s! Sure they are loud when wet but they are very powerful and adjustable with great modulation. They are also light and look good.
    While I cannot deny that 29er wheels make it a bit less agile, this thing is tossable. I love it. Being light it goes up hills easy, rolls over stuff like dried gullies that would have me on the ground bloody on a 26" bike. My ride to the trails is easy. Today I had no problem sticking to the back wheel of a carbon roadie, although being a cute female roadie helped I'm sure. I want to do these near 90 degree roll down drops, some over 10 feet high but am too scared. I know its doable, I can see lots of tracks but its hard to get over that fear, hopefully soon. I love that I can get airborne so fast on it too. I'm no jumper and am **** at those fast trails with tabletops built in(my rear flies up while the front sticks to the ground) but if O'm going at a decent speed and there is some rocks or roots I simply hop over them. This bike loves speed and when I am going fast down a dried out gully full of baby heads I may be holding on for dear life but the titanium does take that sting out of all the bumps. Its a thump rather than a big twang if that makes sense. It also goes where I want it too. I just make sure the front wheel goes in the right spot and the rest follows. I guess the thru axle helps along with the fat DT. Love making my bike my own and its cool reading about others tweaking theirs for their style and conditions.

  9. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    116
    Quote Originally Posted by xmessenger View Post
    My only beef with this frame is the seat tube being out of spec. By that I mean its obviously not exactly 27.2 because no post sits in their , they all slide loose and keeping them put is a pain.
    As I mentioned above, BD paid for a Surly Constrictor seatpost clamp to fix the issue with my frame. Since installing it, I've had no seatpost movement or creaking whatsoever. Even if you have to spend $15-$20 of your own money, it's well worth it, as it will solve your slippage issue.

    FWIW, I contacted Motobecane with the details of the seat tube issue and a suggestion for fixing it. I received a polite reply, but no real indication that they were interested in hearing about it.

  10. #35
    dvn
    dvn is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dvn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    684
    I have one of these frames on the way. I was hoping to use my existing carbon seat post. Is anyone using a carbon post with the Constrictor clamp?
    "Either way it doesn't really matter, I just got back from a bike ride."
    > dbhammercycle

  11. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    116
    I wouldn't do it, if for no other reason than that the actual clamping area on this frame is quite short, which is not is not ideal for any post, but especially not for carbon fiber. It may work, but it just doesn't seem like a good idea. I put a Thompson post on mine, as the stock Ritchey post, which is pretty nice, was too short. That's not likely to be an issue for anyone on a 17" or smaller frame.

  12. #37
    dvn
    dvn is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dvn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    684
    Quote Originally Posted by Bnystrom View Post
    I wouldn't do it, if for no other reason than that the actual clamping area on this frame is quite short, which is not is not ideal for any post, but especially not for carbon fiber. It may work, but it just doesn't seem like a good idea. I put a Thompson post on mine, as the stock Ritchey post, which is pretty nice, was too short. That's not likely to be an issue for anyone on a 17" or smaller frame.
    That seems odd. I've been running this post for a year on my steel framed Kona with never a hint of slippage. Clamping area looks about the same.
    "Either way it doesn't really matter, I just got back from a bike ride."
    > dbhammercycle

  13. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    116
    The issue with the Motobecane frame is that the seat tube is not parallel internally, it tapers slightly. I measured it with an internal tubing micrometer and the amount of taper is significant. Consequently, you end up with a very short section of 10-13mm that's actually gripping the post and the pressure is not even in that area.

    You can test this compared to your other frame. Insert about 4" of the post and tighten the binder bolt just enough to prevent the post from slipping deeper into the frame from it's own weight. Now try to wiggle the post back and forth. Unless your Motobecane frame has a better seat tube fit than mine, you'll find that the post will move a lot more in it than in your Kona. If it fits just as tightly, you're in luck and it should work fine.

  14. #39
    dvn
    dvn is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dvn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    684
    Interesting. I'll give that test a try when I get it. Thanks for your input.
    "Either way it doesn't really matter, I just got back from a bike ride."
    > dbhammercycle

  15. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    116
    You're welcome. I'm curious to hear what you find. BTW, did you order one of the 2013 or 2014 frames? From what I've read, there may be a difference in the seatpost fit.

  16. #41
    dvn
    dvn is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dvn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    684
    Quote Originally Posted by Bnystrom View Post
    You're welcome. I'm curious to hear what you find. BTW, did you order one of the 2013 or 2014 frames? From what I've read, there may be a difference in the seatpost fit.
    Hmm, I'm not sure. It doesn't specify. It was this one: Save up to 60% off new 29er Mountain Bikes - MTB - New Motobecane Fly Titanium 29er

    EDIT: It looks like the 2014 has a tapered headset so Just going by the photos provided, mine's a '13.
    "Either way it doesn't really matter, I just got back from a bike ride."
    > dbhammercycle

  17. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    116
    Yes, that's the older frame. Based on the URL, they must have started using it in 2010. It's a great deal on a frameset!

  18. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    64
    Speaking of post slippage, I got a J&L titanium job and the post barely fits in there at all. I almost don't need a clamp...until I put my considerable weight on it. Then the clamp is a great idea. But the JL doesn't suffer from any of the slippage issues iI've seen here. Extremely happy with my 2013 frame build out. A noticeable difference from my son's Jamis Dragon race. Of course it ended up costing close to three times as much. But so far, so worth it.

  19. #44
    dvn
    dvn is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: dvn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    684
    I am using a Shimano XCR Pro carbon post in mine with a Thomson clamp. Not a hint of slippage or a sound from day one.
    "Either way it doesn't really matter, I just got back from a bike ride."
    > dbhammercycle

  20. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    116
    That's interesting, but I'm hesitant to use a Ti post in a Ti frame, as they can gall and seize if you don't use plenty of Ti-specific anti-seize compound (the copper-colored stuff). This is particularly an issue if the post and frame are made of the same alloy (the frame is 3/2.5, but I can't find any information on the J&L post). A super-tight fit is not ideal in this situation, as even minor galling can make it impossible to remove the post.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 1 2

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •