Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 77
  1. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    3
    BOF BOF
    USA is not a country like the others, you are not the world champions of everything, all country take money and prestige with everybody
    Your bicycle MOTOBECANE are beautiful, you take the same letters

    l'important c'est le dialogue, la compréhension, le respect, le vélo,
    I'm happy to see your forum

  2. #27
    Anti-elitist
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    409
    Remember when I said I though the frame was flexing, causing brake rub?(how naive) Nope. I just had to tighten my QR skewers a little more. Now, there's still a bit of play, but ride is better, no rub(!) and brakes feel slightly meatier. Still, 15mms would have been better.
    Last edited by sauprankul; 10-27-2012 at 07:43 PM.

  3. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    11
    Thanks for taking the time to put this review together.

  4. #29
    Anti-elitist
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    409
    Hi everybody, somebody wanted to see what kind of riding I do, so I took a couple pictures.


    Lots of steep climbs and descents. Dry, dusty dirt. Some small rocks and pebbles. I never felt I needed more braking power, but that may be because I was dragging some. Also, I ran out of driving traction very quickly on the steep climbs and had to get off the bike a couple times. (Wheelspin) I know what you're thinking: bad technique. Maybe. I was leaning back as far as I safely could. I kept my cadence constant. I don't know what else I had to do. I got my 4th flat(>1 hole per instance) since I've had this bike, and I think it's time to do something about it. Slime, tubeless, thicker tube, or tire strip?

    EDIT: Here's another park I went to. Lots of tight, slopey, slanty, rocky, dusty singletrack. The rocks were about the size of Nerf footballs (but they weren't loose and half of each rock was under the trail).

    I actually had my first (and only) crash here. There was a long and enticing slope. At the end of it was a sharp turn, and I almost made it, but for some reason, my front tire was attracted to a ditch by the trail.... needless to say,

    Here's a picture of what it looked like. It got steeper and narrower than this, though.

    Note that I took off the light after the crash.
    Today, I can safely say that the brakes are insufficient, even for me. I had to pull as hard as I could to just control my speed.
    And I take back what I said about the seat. After playing with the angle, it seems to cradle my bones perfectly. But I don't use it much. So, maybe it's not so good for longer (seated) rides.
    Last edited by sauprankul; 11-04-2012 at 06:05 PM.
    It's pronounced "so pro and cool."
    It was an impulse decision.

  5. #30
    My Brain Hurts!
    Reputation: ProfGumby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    701
    Quote Originally Posted by sauprankul View Post
    Hi everybody, somebody wanted to see what kind of riding I do, so I took a couple pictures.


    ....ran out of driving traction very quickly on the steep climbs and had to get off the bike a couple times. (Wheelspin) I know what you're thinking: bad technique. .....
    skinny tires don't help at all if technique is off.... nice looking ride! If the holes in your tubes are on the rim side of the tube, you need to make sure there are no high spots jabbing the tube. I had to add a second rim strip on my roadie....
    Remember when we were kids and our Mom's said we could not play in the mud? I'm making up for it now!!

  6. #31
    Anti-elitist
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    409
    Quote Originally Posted by ProfGumby View Post
    skinny tires don't help at all if technique is off....
    So, what you mean is, with good technique, I can use slim tires. And since I don't have good technique, I should run wider tires. Is that right?

    What do you think is wrong with my technique? What do you do when taking steep climbs?
    It's pronounced "so pro and cool."
    It was an impulse decision.

  7. #32
    My Brain Hurts!
    Reputation: ProfGumby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    701
    Quote Originally Posted by sauprankul View Post
    So, what you mean is, with good technique, I can use slim tires. And since I don't have good technique, I should run wider tires. Is that right?

    What do you think is wrong with my technique? What do you do when taking steep climbs?
    I meant nothing hidden. I merely made a comment on what you said. I commented on technique because you questioned your technique yourself.

    I stay seated (usually) and it sounds like you do too. I use the granny gear and its friend (1st or 2nd gear) and spin up the hill. Climbing is a balance between a lot of factors, as I am still learning. Does the rider hammer up the climbs or fluidly spin up the climbs? Tires, tire width, tire tread, gear selection, crank arm length, momentum, pedal selection (clipped in or not clipped in), rider position, rider power, bike geometry, weather and trail makeup all come into play.

    From my days of building street rods, skinny tires have much less surface on the ground, hence, easier to break loose than a wider tire, all things equal. In general this is true with a mountain bike.

    It sounds/looks like you ride a fair bit of loose gravely stuff too. Wheels spin out on that stuff almost as bad as the wet leaves and sand I play in from time to time here.

    I am still learning the game here my friend and have been told, and learned that a guy will have to get off the bike from time to time no matter what.

    Again, nice ride you have there...
    Remember when we were kids and our Mom's said we could not play in the mud? I'm making up for it now!!

  8. #33
    Anti-elitist
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    409
    Quote Originally Posted by ProfGumby View Post
    I meant nothing hidden. I merely made a comment on what you said. I commented on technique because you questioned your technique yourself.

    I stay seated (usually) and it sounds like you do too. I use the granny gear and its friend (1st or 2nd gear) and spin up the hill. Climbing is a balance between a lot of factors, as I am still learning. Does the rider hammer up the climbs or fluidly spin up the climbs? Tires, tire width, tire tread, gear selection, crank arm length, momentum, pedal selection (clipped in or not clipped in), rider position, rider power, bike geometry, weather and trail makeup all come into play.

    From my days of building street rods, skinny tires have much less surface on the ground, hence, easier to break loose than a wider tire, all things equal. In general this is true with a mountain bike.

    It sounds/looks like you ride a fair bit of loose gravely stuff too.
    I never meant that you meant something hidden. I was just clarifying.

    I am pretty new to offroad (I'm afraid to call it mountain biking) biking myself, and seriously was asking for pointers, which you supplied. thx
    You're right about gravelly/dusty stuff being slippery, but it gives you a very fair warning before losing you and there's a large threshold. Wet stuff, not so much. So I'm quite far from the mud/slime right now.
    It's pronounced "so pro and cool."
    It was an impulse decision.

  9. #34
    My Brain Hurts!
    Reputation: ProfGumby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    701
    Quote Originally Posted by sauprankul View Post
    I never meant that you meant something hidden. I was just clarifying.

    I am pretty new to offroad (I'm afraid to call it mountain biking) biking myself, and seriously was asking for pointers, which you supplied. thx
    You're right about gravelly/dusty stuff being slippery, but it gives you a very fair warning before losing you and there's a large threshold. Wet stuff, not so much. So I'm quite far from the mud/slime right now.
    I am also watching every thread about any Motobecane bike right now as I will be upgrading my Mountain Bike soon and probably a full suspension...I am very interested in the opinions of the guys (qand gals) who ride them.

    And I hear ya on the "Mountain Biking" thing...around here people who are trying to be funny say, "What Mountain?".....as there are none... I prefer to call it trail riding, or off roading but then folks think ATV or dirt bike...
    Remember when we were kids and our Mom's said we could not play in the mud? I'm making up for it now!!

  10. #35
    Anti-elitist
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    409
    If you're going to be going FS, I wouldn't recommended going with a cheaper bike because the coil shocks don't seem good (Kind shock?). But if you have to, you have to. Hardtails aren't too bad either, but I don't know what kind of riding you do.

    If you're otw about BD, don't be. The people who want a slick bike with good handling will wanna go LBS. But those who just want good components for less money, BD is the way to go. Don't expect the BD bike to feel or handle too well.

    If you're afraid of the customer service, you have good reason. Email only is pretty sketchy, but that's why BD is so cheap. They responded to me pretty swiftly, but I don't know how they'll react when the chips are down.

    I don't know if trail riding is right either. I think that's closer to AM than XC. I dunno.
    It's pronounced "so pro and cool."
    It was an impulse decision.

  11. #36
    Anti-elitist
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    409
    Sorry guys but I recently stumbled upon something that I wish I had seen before. I think I am having a SLIGHT case of buyers remorse. Between this, the 400ht and Airborne skyhawk, I feel like I got less than I would have liked. Maybe the 29er Advantage is helping, but I don't think I would have minded a 26".

    Airborne bicycles is a company that makes cheap bikes as well, only more "legit". They don't use off the shelf frames, so the ride quality is supposed to be better. Also, while BD emphasizes drive train specs, Airborne emphasizes fork, frame, wheels and brakes. The skyhawk is 350 with XCM fork(Better than XCT and DEF better than NVX), Auriga hydros (!), Alex wheels, and an X4 RD/Shifters. But the crank set and front mech are pretty bad. I would have bought this had I known about it because it is better where, IMO, it matters most. Not to mention it looks SLICK.

    Airborne Bicycles. Cross Country 26&29"

    I don't think I would recommend the Elite to anyone because it isn't a very good mtn and it is a pretty bad roadie. The Skyhawk seems better for me and so does the 400ht.

    If you MUST have a 700c mtb w/ narrow rims and tires, a cruddy fork, and a scale tipping weight(For a road bike), go for this. Otherwise just get a dedicated mtb or CX bike.

    But it isn't a TERRIBLE bike. It functions. But if you can get your hands on a 400 or skyhawk, go for that instead.
    It's pronounced "so pro and cool."
    It was an impulse decision.

  12. #37
    My Brain Hurts!
    Reputation: ProfGumby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    701
    Quote Originally Posted by sauprankul View Post
    Sorry guys but I recently stumbled upon something that I wish I had seen before. I think I am having a SLIGHT case of buyers remorse. Between this, the 400ht and Airborne skyhawk, I feel like I got less than I would have liked. Maybe the 29er Advantage is helping, but I don't think I would have minded a 26".

    Airborne bicycles is a company that makes cheap bikes as well, only more "legit". They don't use off the shelf frames, so the ride quality is supposed to be better. Also, while BD emphasizes drive train specs, Airborne emphasizes fork, frame, wheels and brakes. The skyhawk is 350 with XCM fork(Better than XCT and DEF better than NVX), Auriga hydros (!), Alex wheels, and an X4 RD/Shifters. But the crank set and front mech are pretty bad. I would have bought this had I known about it because it is better where, IMO, it matters most. Not to mention it looks SLICK.

    Airborne Bicycles. Cross Country 26&29"



    I don't think I would recommend the Elite to anyone because it isn't a very good mtn and it is a pretty bad roadie. The Skyhawk seems better for me and so does the 400ht.

    If you MUST have a 700c mtb w/ narrow rims and tires, a cruddy fork, and a scale tipping weight(For a road bike), go for this. Otherwise just get a dedicated mtb or CX bike.

    But it isn't a TERRIBLE bike. It functions. But if you can get your hands on a 400 or skyhawk, go for that instead.
    Airborne seems to have some pretty good stuff! I am definitely going for a true All Mountain type bike.

    And I am still a ways off from buying another mtn bike and there is still a pretty good chance it will be a giant Trance if I go full suspension. And right across the river is a Trek dealer and I am also considering the Fuel, probably a Fuel 6 due to clydes reporting the rear shock performs better on the 6 than the 7 or above.

    And I have always been a fan of supporting the local bike shop.

    If I stay on a hardtail it will have to be a 29'er but I am really, and I mean really liking the idea of a 650b! And since I am still a huge fan of steel frames, the Jamis Dragon is the front runner if I stay hardtail...gotta travel a bit to get one though.
    Remember when we were kids and our Mom's said we could not play in the mud? I'm making up for it now!!

  13. #38
    Anti-elitist
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    409
    Quote Originally Posted by ProfGumby View Post
    I am definitely going for a true All Mountain type bike.

    And I have always been a fan of supporting the local bike shop.

    If I stay on a hardtail it will have to be a 29'er but I am really, and I mean really liking the idea of a 650b!
    29ers are for xped riders only (which you prolly are), IMHO, because the avg recreational rider won't be able to distinguish the difference very well. Well, at least I can't. 29ers are meant to hold a more stable line, whereas 26" bikes are supposed to be whippable. I wouldn't go 29er for AM, because you need to be able to control your bike very sharply. A sluggish 29er isn't going to cut it. I was able to do all sorts of crazy things on my 24" FS, but squat on the Elite. Admittedly, the 24" FS was a pogo stick on wheels. IDK if that was the reason.

    Good job about the LBS. If you can afford it, go local! (I can't)

    I don't think even a long travel HT is going to do well on AM, let alone an XC rig. You will need FS to go AM. Kind shock, apparently, is a big-ish brand, so the coil shocks don't seem too bad. (But in the Trance's price range, you'll only get air shocks.) If you really want an HT, (which you don't) BD has a 130mm Tora on a 26".

    Never tried a 650b, but you probably might want to hold off on it unless you have the $$$. The selection for 650b componentry (rims/tires/tubes) is rather low. But you can always convert your 29er and sometimes, even 26" to 650b if you'd like. 650bs, as someone said, is the jack of all trades, but master of none. You won't get the full advantage of either size, and I'm telling you from experience (Elite, I'm looking at you), COMPROMISE NEVER WORKS. Hybrids suck and 650b is a type of hybrid. But I'm not one to talk. You may wish to try a 27.5 before purchasing one, just to be sure.

    Oh BTW, bikesdirect doesn't have DHFRAM (pronounced diaphragm, I made it up) bikes. It only has XC bikes (AFAIK), where only somewhat steep climbs and descents are made, with minimal obstacles. So be prepared to feel weird when riding a Fantom AM.
    Last edited by sauprankul; 11-04-2012 at 06:06 PM.
    It's pronounced "so pro and cool."
    It was an impulse decision.

  14. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation: BigDaddyFlyer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    1,765
    Quote Originally Posted by sauprankul View Post
    29ers are for xped riders only (which you prolly are), IMHO, because the avg recreational rider won't be able to distinguish the difference very well. Well, at least I can't. 29ers are meant to hold a more stable line, whereas 26" bikes are supposed to be whippable. I wouldn't go 29er for AM, because you need to be able to control your bike very sharply. I sluggish 29er isn't going to cut it.
    I don't know, I really think that beginner riders benefit from 29inch wheels. They do roll nicer and over obstacles better. For most beginner riders, getting over roots and rocks is difficult for them so anything that makes it easier, and keeps them riding, is a good thing.

    Also I think just about anyone can notice the difference in wheel size if you go out and do a test ride with similar-equipped bikes with 26 and 29 wheels.

    Once you get used to the handling of a 29er it really feels no different than a 26. When I made the switch a few years back it only took me 2-3 weeks of riding before I forgot what wheel size I was riding and was tossing the bike around like a 26er.

    29ers aren't sluggish if done correctly, IMHO.

    Jeremy
    Homebrewer, Patriot, Amateur Photographer

  15. #40
    AZ
    AZ is offline
    banned
    Reputation: AZ's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Posts
    19,996
    Quote Originally Posted by sauprankul View Post
    29ers are for xped riders only (which you prolly are), IMHO, because the avg recreational rider won't be able to distinguish the difference very well. Well, at least I can't. 29ers are meant to hold a more stable line, whereas 26" bikes are supposed to be whippable. .


    Most riders I have seen try both could tell a difference and newbs do especially well on bigger wheels ime. YMMV.

  16. #41
    Anti-elitist
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    409
    Hmmm... How big are you guys? I'm 130(hoping to reduce a little) and weak so maybe that affects how the bike feels for me. Maybe it only feels sluggish because of MY limitations, rather than the wheel size. I have ridden 26" hts, but not similarly equipped ones.
    It's pronounced "so pro and cool."
    It was an impulse decision.

  17. #42
    My Brain Hurts!
    Reputation: ProfGumby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    701
    I am at least 6 months to a year out on adding a new bike to my stable. And I fully intend to hang on to my 26" hard tail! A guy can never have too many choices....

    I am going to ride a lot of bikes before I decide where I will end up. I pretty much feel that with my size and my leg power I can whip any bike around as long as the geometry of the frame suits me.

    If I get another hard tail it will be 650 or 29er, no question. If I go full suspension it could go anyway, but will most likely be a 26'er or a 650b. At least that's how it stands now.

    I have to ride a full suspension or 3 on trails to see what I think. I had a Giant Trance a few years ago and just flat out did not like the feel of the rear suspension. It was a PITA setting up the bike for my weight and riding style and I hated, and I mean hated, the squishy feel and pedal bob when climbing under any power at all.

    It was a tough enough choice as I otherwise really liked the bike. But I missed my hard tail.

    If in all my test riding I cannot see a solid reason reason to upgrade/add another bike I will just keep slugging along on my 26er hard tail and upgrade this or that and replace what I wear out...
    Remember when we were kids and our Mom's said we could not play in the mud? I'm making up for it now!!

  18. #43
    My Brain Hurts!
    Reputation: ProfGumby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    701
    Quote Originally Posted by sauprankul View Post
    Hmmm... How big are you guys? I'm 130(hoping to reduce a little) and weak so maybe that affects how the bike feels for me. Maybe it only feels sluggish because of MY limitations, rather than the wheel size. I have ridden 26" hts, but not similarly equipped ones.
    Picture a Buffalo riding a bike....

    I'm 5'11 and weight about 280. But that is going down slowly. I am rather muscular too (56/58 inch chest 17 inch neck) I ride my roadie a lot and mountain bike as often as time allows. I am pushing 1600 miles for the year on my road bike and mountain bike combined. I can leg press about 400 pounds at the moment but used to be able to max out the machine @ 500 the only place I am not fit is the spare tire around my waist...
    Remember when we were kids and our Mom's said we could not play in the mud? I'm making up for it now!!

  19. #44
    Anti-elitist
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    409
    Daaaaaaang...... I think I see the problem here (w/ me). You should have no problem w/ sluggishness on a 29er.
    EDIT: I also read somewhere that 29er are meant for people around 6' in height. They offer more "natural" geometry for tall people. I'm pretty short @ 5' 6.5", so I think the 29er Advantage may not be for me. A 26" bike will probably be more comfortable (not to mention whippable) to me than a 29er. My next bike will definitely be a 26" bike, unless I suddenly shoot up to 5' 10" (not).
    EDIT again: Are 29ers just tall people bikes?
    Apparently not. I may get another 29er, but only after extensive test riding.
    Last edited by sauprankul; 11-06-2012 at 06:16 PM.
    It's pronounced "so pro and cool."
    It was an impulse decision.

  20. #45
    Anti-elitist
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    409
    OBSCURE SPECS con'td: There's an edit limit (?)
    Crankset model: SR Suntour CW9 XCC T202 PB for Road, Street, Trekking / Commuting. NOT MTBing!!! Value of this is $32, a little less than that of an Acera crankset.
    Crank length: 170mm (175 for larger sizes)
    BB model: BB10 XCT SQS 122C CBT This should be OK for "cross country only"
    BB specs: 68(w) x 122(l)
    Tube Valve: Schrader w/ removable core
    Max disk diameter: 160mm which is disappointing. Kudos to SR st for same day reply.
    Crank gearing: 28/38/48 again not meant for mtbing.
    Cassette gearing: 11-32
    Last edited by sauprankul; 11-27-2012 at 11:18 PM.
    It's pronounced "so pro and cool."
    It was an impulse decision.

  21. #46
    Anti-elitist
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    409
    And the spec you've a all been waiting for:
    THE WEIGHT!
    wait for it....
    31.3 lbs. Yep.
    That's with stock pedals, water bottle cage, bigger, wider bars, longer stem, longer burlier seat post, kick stand and Avenue 5x as thick Thorn resistant tubes.
    So take off about 1.5 lbs to get to stock and its about 29.8 lbs. Yep. Its a freaking feather guys. I bet I could "give those Roadies a good scare" huh. Dual sport bike my butt.
    Maybe my scale is off? I measured about 8 times and most of them were in the 31 range. Some were more, one was less.
    EDIT: SR suntour added new info to their website:
    SR SUNTOUR Cycling
    Apparently 180mm is the max disk diameter. I don't know if I should listen to the rep or the website. I may ask again.
    Last edited by sauprankul; 12-04-2012 at 12:00 AM.
    It's pronounced "so pro and cool."
    It was an impulse decision.

  22. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    8
    Purchased a Motobecane Elite Trial, Dec 2012. Had the LBS assemble it and test it. They discovered it does not shift gears without the chain jumping so they had it on the rack for two hours and could not figure out why, they brought in an outside mechanic who said his best guess was the rear derailer as it was twisted or tweaked. If not then it had to be the gears themselves, they will replace the SRAM with a shimono rear derailer at my request, hoping this fixes it. Also parts were missing, emailed Bikes direct, they replied two days later, requesting a photo of the parts I had. Based on these experiences I would not recommend to others that they purchase from this company. One is hoping that there are better choices out there.
    Last edited by theswedish; 12-06-2012 at 01:20 PM.

  23. #48
    Anti-elitist
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    409
    You have a second rate LBS.
    Sorry I said it so harshly, but its true. If they can't figure out why your bike can't shift, then they have no knowledge about how a derailer works. Even the most damaged, bent up derailer would still move when pulled on.

    Further, they are going to replace a SRAM rear derailer with a Shimano? SRAM (pronounced shram) is a reputable company and their rear derailers are NOT compatible with Shimano shifters and vice versa.

    Post some pics of your bike and tell me what parts are missing, exactly.
    It's pronounced "so pro and cool."
    It was an impulse decision.

  24. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    8
    Thank you for your post. I chose the LBS based on reviews on Google, Yelp and bike forums, it is by no means the closest, however it is highly spoken of by the local bike community. Parts missing are front and rear reflector, quick release, pedals and if the bike comes with it, assembly instructions, there was included a plastic bag saying there were small parts inside, but it was empty on arrival.

  25. #50
    Anti-elitist
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    409
    Ok. All the things that you mentioned are in a separate box, in the big box. They do not come attached to he bike. The box is pretty small, about the size of a harry potter novel. Check the big box again and if it isn't there (which it may not), then you're gonna have to talk with BD.

    Assembly instructions are not included.
    It's pronounced "so pro and cool."
    It was an impulse decision.

Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1 2 3 4 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •