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  1. #1
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    Motobecane bikes are owned by beginners !!!

    Hey Guys,

    What does everyone think of my above statement? I myself just ordered a new Motobecane bike (Hal6 Pro) and Ive been riding for 25 years. However, I also haven't kept up with current bikes and have always just rode cheaper, old tech bikes. Im super excited about my purchase and cant wait for it to come, but as I look through all these forum threads on Motobecanes it seems that most of the riders of these bikes are people that are either like me (not on the cutting edge) , or are new to mountain biking. This makes me wonder if once someone is more experienced whether they head off to other big name brands, and if so, why.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cc in Hawaii View Post
    Hey Guys,

    What does everyone think of my above statement? I myself just ordered a new Motobecane bike (Hal6 Pro) and Ive been riding for 25 years. However, I also haven't kept up with current bikes and have always just rode cheaper, old tech bikes. Im super excited about my purchase and cant wait for it to come, but as I look through all these forum threads on Motobecanes it seems that most of the riders of these bikes are people that are either like me (not on the cutting edge) , or are new to mountain biking. This makes me wonder if once someone is more experienced whether they head off to other big name brands, and if so, why.
    I'm just like you, been riding on and off since 1989. I have never bought big name, at least not new. I have a 1991 Stumpy M2, that I will never part with. Paid $500 for it from a guy that hardly used it. I beat the heck out of that thing for probably 15 years. I've mentioned in other threads that bike prices have out paced people's paychecks more so than ever before. Furthermore it's all about carbon fiber which I've never bought into. It fatigues and one impact can render it unusable. Most big name companies don't give more than a 5 year warranty on their carbon frames, and that doesn't cover impacts, just manufacturer defects. I think Motobecane is just fine as long as they maintain quality control. I received a frame with a severely messed up bottom bracket machine job. Replacement is on the way and I hope it's squared away. If not then I will go away from Motobecane as they have let their quality control slip. My 2004 Motobecane 700HT was great and I rode that for a while before building a Litech Magnesium frame, which is the best riding bike I have ever ridden. That is my current ride until my Fly Team titanium arrives and I put it together. I wanted to go 29'er so Motobecane was the best option for the best price to build a very nicely spec'ed machine. I hope it all works out. For those that don't mind spending $5,000+, they can buy big name. I think Moots or Litespeed builds awesome titanium frames, but the frame alone costs $1,000 more than a complete bike from Motobecane. The reason is it's American made using American labor instead of Taiwanese. They also double butt their frames but that's not worth that much more, in my opinion. I think you will enjoy your Motobecane. Just make sure you check everything thoroughly or have your LBS tune it up. Motobecane is well known for not greasing and torquing stuff correctly.

    Sent from my XT1575 using Tapatalk

  3. #3
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    My 29er and fatbike are bikesdirect, but with modifications. My 29er is a gravity 29.2 that I've replaced everything except the headset, seatpost, and seat clamp. Everything else has been worn out or replaced. The only thing left is the frame, and when comparing that to a more expensive frame, in time, I'll probably end up replacing it too. The gravity frame was about 1 lb heavier than a better quality frame, but it was also a whole lot less. I think that's where the distinction lies.

    Newer riders who don't know the difference between a moto frame and a $$$$$ frame, won't care about the performance difference. And that's fine. Someone whose been riding a bike for a while might know there is a difference, but really doesn't care. I could easily get a better frame, but I don't need one. I'd rather spend my money on new tires and energy gel. Once my gravity frame brakes, I'll get a new one. Probably steel with a different geometry.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    My 29er and fatbike are bikesdirect, but with modifications. My 29er is a gravity 29.2 that I've replaced everything except the headset, seatpost, and seat clamp. Everything else has been worn out or replaced. The only thing left is the frame, and when comparing that to a more expensive frame, in time, I'll probably end up replacing it too. The gravity frame was about 1 lb heavier than a better quality frame, but it was also a whole lot less. I think that's where the distinction lies.

    Newer riders who don't know the difference between a moto frame and a $$$$$ frame, won't care about the performance difference. And that's fine. Someone whose been riding a bike for a while might know there is a difference, but really doesn't care. I could easily get a better frame, but I don't need one. I'd rather spend my money on new tires and energy gel. Once my gravity frame brakes, I'll get a new one. Probably steel with a different geometry.
    To an experienced enthusiast, how much does 1lb weight decrease really make on the riding experience? Wouldn't shedding 1lb produce same result? (Just saying)

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    Quote Originally Posted by BobaX View Post
    To an experienced enthusiast, how much does 1lb weight decrease really make on the riding experience? Wouldn't shedding 1lb produce same result? (Just saying)
    I think saving weight on drive train components and wheelset is far more important than the frame. Your drive train and wheels are the parts that move. Lighter means less resistance. That's why I opted for the frame set so I can build my drive train and wheels myself. 1 pound difference in frame means something but not $1,000+ dollars in my opinion. I would rather spend that $1,000 on nice wheels and drive train components.

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  6. #6
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    Given the forum you're posting in, you're probably going to get a lot of pro-Motobecane sentiment. I can tell you why I don't have, and haven't had, a catalog bike.

    I started riding as a kid. I think Motobecane the French company was still solvent at the time and the Internet was something only research universities had access to. Catalogs certainly existed and I'm sure they carried some bikes, but they didn't have the kind of reach that web sites do. My little kid bike was a Huffy. I riding bikes to school in High School, when Geocities was cool and the only people making money online were the ISPs themselves and maybe porn sites. Funny enough, that bike was an old Motobecane (the French kind) that I insisted on putting flat bars on because I didn't understand drop bars.

    It sounds like bikesdirect got started about when I finished High School, but I don't think I heard of them until 2009, at least. By that time, I'd already owned a few bikes, both new and used. I was also struggling with a bike that I eventually decided is too big.

    If I want a lot of bike for not much money, I buy used. Usually more for enough bike for very little money. I still get to test ride, which is important to me.

    If I'm spending more, I want something I'll really love, starting with the basic geometry and fit. To my eye, BD's frames often have weird geometry. Having fought a bike I was never able to dial in once, I don't really want to do it again. I also didn't start buying into rear suspension until just a few years ago. While I think the majors have it pretty well sorted out at this point, from other brands, it still feels like a big risk to me.

    And it's not like major-brand bikes are never available at a discount. It may take some hookups or some patience, but someone who's been riding for a while is unlikely to need a new bike terribly quickly, and a lot of long-term cyclists do have hookups.

    So I guess my bottom line is that they fall in an in between area, where I think I can get better value on the used market and I demand more demo time and a better reputation from new bikes, which aren't costing me that much more through my chosen channel anyway.

    FWIW, my brother has a BD bike he rides to work.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  7. #7
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    I can't tell the weight difference, but I'm also carrying an extra ### around my big ole belly. I will say I can tell the difference in how a high quality frame feels vs. a cheap frame in regards to stiffness and flex, but only when the wheels/tires/forks/setup are the same. You swap one of those other things, and the frame feel isn't as big a deal. $50 frame with an XCT upgraded to a $50 frame with a suntour raidon or rockshox recon will be a massively huge change for under $250. A $50 frame with a raidon fork to a $800 frame with a raidon will be noticeable if you're aggressive riding the trails, but the price is harder to justify.

    Frame geometry also plays a part. One frame geometry to rule them all, is a lie. Everybody likes different geometry, and you won't know what you like till you ride a lot.
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  8. #8
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    There are beginners riding every brand out there.

    I've been passed by riders on every brand imaginable.

    On a particularly steep climb one time, I was even passed by a Pee Wee Herman bike (and single speed to boot). The guy was wearing jeans and flip flops. That made my day.

    I love this sport.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by tk1971 View Post
    There are beginners riding every brand out there.

    I've been passed by riders on every brand imaginable.

    On a particularly steep climb one time, I was even passed by a Pee Wee Herman bike (and single speed to boot). The guy was wearing jeans and flip flops. That made my day.

    I love this sport.
    LOL...


    I have a Hal5 Comp on order, really looking forward to getting it. Hoping to hit some trails before the weather starts to get too hot.

  10. #10
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    I am what i would call a "price point buyer." I have always shopped for a budget-based item in any category of any hobby or , really anything. This gets me into whatever it is I am interested in. then i simply increasy my abilities to make the best use of that item possible. I enjoy it more when i can afford it. I don't sweat the opinions of others.


    I also currently fall into similar categories of long layoffs, extensive, but old off road experience from the 80's and 90's (even a ton of hybrid bike offroading, which is now known as 29-er...so it appears, with some tweaks.)

    I just love to ride. My wife says my bike appears "effortless" and i take that as a personal compliment, since i know i'm not on top-drawer tech. I am enjoying the heck out of my 450ds with a few light mods that keep my total investment under 450 bucks and i ride the trails we have here just like everybody else.

    I still own and ride my old cilo 12 speed 105 road bike, my old schwinn 21 speed crisscross hybrid (for the katy trail limestone rails-to-trails) and now my motobecane 450ds dedicated off road and trail bike.

  11. #11
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    I've had two Moto's from BD. Am I a beginner? You tell me.... I've got 30+ years riding, was a professional mechanic, went on RAAM twice, member of International Randonneurs, and was a custom bike frame builder for a well known, tall guy in Boulder for six years. I'm not a beginner, I'm a smart person for not dropping $2000 on a bike that I can get for less than half that amount.
    The member formerly known as Redtires....

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Handlebar View Post
    I've had two Moto's from BD. Am I a beginner? You tell me.... I've got 30+ years riding, was a professional mechanic, went on RAAM twice, member of International Randonneurs, and was a custom bike frame builder for a well known, tall guy in Boulder for six years. I'm not a beginner, I'm a smart person for not dropping $2000 on a bike that I can get for less than half that amount.

    Wow! so you tell US, are these frames as good as the big names of specialized, trek, and Giant?

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cc in Hawaii View Post
    Wow! so you tell US, are these frames as good as the big names of specialized, trek, and Giant?
    I can only speak for aluminum, as those are the only two Moto's I've had. But...unless you are going for a VERY high end aluminum frame, yes, I would say they are just as good. It's honestly not difficult to design a straight up Al frame. I would put this Kinesis made frame up against a Rockhopper any day. Specialized's bikes are ALL made in asia now by Merida, Ideal and Giant. Giant of course manufactures it's own frames under it's own name. Trek is the second largest manufacturer in the world behind Giant. All of their mid-level bikes are made in Asia as well.

    When you buy a Specialized, Trek or a Giant, you invest a good amount of the total cost of the bike into their marketing, sponsorship and the cost involved in having a huge network of distributors (i.e. stores). The store has to make money, the company has to make money and someone has to get paid to sell you the bike..and then another person to build the bike up for you before you ride it out the door.

    Now granted, there are lot's of consumers out there who want NOTHING to do with building and maintaining their own bike, and that's fine. But for those of us who have invested in years of working on bikes, tools and knowledge, it makes no sense to buy a bike at a shop.
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  14. #14
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    You are also investing in research in development when you buy from many of the big manufacturer. What brands innovate? What brands copy and follow? Put your money in what brand you want to succeed.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by itsky View Post
    Put your money in what brand you want to succeed.
    Jack Daniels makes bikes?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flucod View Post
    FYI - Giant produces ALL of Trek now (has done for years), Trek does not mfg anything anymore.

    And explain to me , if the frames are the same quality, why are the frames alone so much heavier? Speaking of AL, not the TI ones.

    I think BD bikes are good entry level equipment, we assemble many per month for customers. The quality is not the same as some other top tier brands.
    Wow, so it is confirmed that the frames ARE heavier?!? by how much? like how much would a specialized FSR frame compare to a motobecane 6byy6 weight wise from what youve seen?

  17. #17
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    For a frame of reference, an alloy hardtail frame weighs on the order of 3.5 lb. The '16 highest-end alloy Scott Scale is advertised as weighing 1470 g. (About 3.2 lb.) Performance's house-brand alloy hardtail frame is advertised as weighing 3.8 lb.

    I'd expect a bigger swing in weight with FS frames.

    So my question to you is, is a pound a lot or a little?
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flucod View Post
    FYI - Giant produces ALL of Trek now (has done for years), Trek does not mfg anything anymore.

    And explain to me , if the frames are the same quality, why are the frames alone so much heavier? Speaking of AL, not the TI ones.

    I think BD bikes are good entry level equipment, we assemble many per month for customers. The quality is not the same as some other top tier brands.
    Weight and quality are not the same thing, not by a longshot. Other manufacturers may indeed use a lighter tubeset, that doesn't mean it's any better. I can make a really light bike that's a piece of crap if I want to. And yes, I've worked many years in shops as well, and assembled, fixed and sold the gamut etc, etc... I stand behind my assessment of the Motobecane, at least at this level. I also stand behind my knowledge of the retail market.

    Also, Trek does indeed produce all their high end OCLV bikes, by hand, in Waterloo, Wisconsin.
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  19. #19
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    Low end frames ($300-$600) tend to be made of straight tubing of a lower grade metal. Heavier due to straight tubing, and flex more, have a lower life expectancy, and a lower failure point due to weaker metal. These bikes often come equipped with non-trail or bottom end trail components. There's a lot more going on that just a pound or two.
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  20. #20
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    I don't think low end frames are as bad as all that. Making something strong enough isn't that hard, especially if it's a pretty mature technology. So I'd be more worried about frames with rear suspension. Optimizing takes a ton of engineering time. For the same reasons, I wouldn't be terribly worried about stiffness or service life for a hardtail. I've seen some pretty embarrassing FS designs.

    No argument about the terrible, often inappropriate components, though. And they certainly don't share in recent developments in geometry, again more important for FS bikes.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cc in Hawaii View Post
    Wow, so it is confirmed that the frames ARE heavier?!?
    Weight is about quality level. Cheap light weight frame = junk, Cheap heavy frame = strong (stronger at least), expensive light weight frame = good frame.

    The BD alloy frames are the same as the $500-700 big name alloy frames. heavy alloy tubing that will last under normal trail use. It won't take 5' drops, because that's not what they are designed to do, the BD bikes or the $500 LBS bikes. Trying to compare a BD frame to a $1000 big name frame (just the frame, by itself) is not a comparison.

    For the record, my 21" gravity 29er frame with steel headset cups in it weighed about 4.7 lbs. Heavier than I expected, but in the big picture, adding on a water bottle adds almost 1.5 lbs (cage, bottle, & water). Can you tell the ride difference when you have a water bottle on the frame?
    "a hundred travel books isn't worth one real trip"

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flucod View Post
    .... Not bad for what you spend, but let us not fool ourselves to thinking they are best quality out there either....
    I don't recall reading anything stating that they are the best quality out there. I compared them (mine) to a Rockhopper...so, there you have it. My entire point is that if you know what your buying, getting a bike from a wholesaler is perfectly legit. BD, for example, sells a wide range of bikes...some for beginners, some will suit highly advanced riders. Just like a bike shop!
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  23. #23
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    I admit being a beginner when I owned my Motobecane. It's helped me expand my known world, by not stranding me out there with shitty parts that I neglected to maintain. One of my first biggest rides was a solo trip to San Juan Trail all the way to Blue Jay Campground, and back down the way I came. Think it took 3.5 hours just to climb it, and 1h to descend. Couldn't complain about my experience on it. While I'm on better now, I don't regret having made the purchase ~6 years ago.
    We're all on the same ship, and it's sinking.

  24. #24
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    I see some illuminated posts and some overtly biased ones. Welcome to the world of inna'nut forums, right?

    I'm betting that some of the folks commenting didn't even bother to check the specific bike that you were talking about, Cc. In their defense, you might post a link if you know how. No worries, I gotcha covered

    To the subject at hand- Looks like a very solid rig in my book. I'd be glad to own it. Good value, good parts (I'd love to have that XTR rear derailleur and some RF Turbine cranks!). Tubeless ready wheels. Nice!

    Now for the bad (keepin' it real)--and it's not THAT bad--depending upon who you are and what you really need. (Full disclosure- I own a Motobecane Sturgis fat bike. That may bias me, but I'm being as objective as possible). Yes, the frame will likely weigh a little more than a "big name" high end frame. I'm no racer. Are you? What's a pound?

    With my bike, the frame is Kinesis made, good quality. But it's not all triple-butted or anything like that. I've got a shock up front and fat tires so I don't care if it doesn't have magical ride qualities and just the right amount of flex in just the right places. Your bike will have front and rear suspension. So I highly doubt you'd notice anyway. Maybe I'm wrong. And carrying that extra pound... can you live with that?

    The OTHER thing about Bikes-Direct is that they can't take care of issues the way a brick and mortar neighborhood shop can. Just a fact. I like having the LBS near sometimes. I'd be bummed if the shop went belly up, so I buy from them too. Even when I know there are better deals. I like the convenience.

    For most folks who buy from Bikes-Direct, they understand this fact when they place an order. And I'm not saying that B-D service is bad. It's just not the same as having the shop to wheel into. Some people should NOT order from B-D as I've seen people "crying" over something as minute as a scratched chainring. Maybe they have a point. But if you're like that, then definitely stay away from mail order bikes.

    All that said, enjoy your new bike, looks sweet to me. Beginner! (I guess I'm a "beginner" too, since about '93 that is, when I first got into this sport)
    Last edited by AthleticAL; 05-06-2016 at 01:04 PM.
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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by AthleticAL View Post
    Some people should NOT order from B-D as I've seen people "crying" over something as minute as a scratched chainring.
    Oh boy, that was an interesting discussion.
    "a hundred travel books isn't worth one real trip"

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    For a frame of reference...
    I see what you did there.
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    Wow, thanks for the lively discussion everyone. The advice and experience is much appreciated. It's amazing to me how much mountain biking has changed over the last 20 years. Reading the posts on mtbr and some bike magazines I've recently purchased, I'm amazed at both the cost, and the quality of new mountain bikes. the prices still seem out of hand to me as some are $10k for the top end models but they only weigh 3-4 lbs less than the $3k model. That is more than a nice dirt bike that comes with a motor, lol. I assume that's because the market (high end bike market) is so much newer and less units are produced and sold. Here's a question. What are the best value full suspension mountain bike models (bang for the buck) that you all know of, motobecane or otherwise with decent components (no alivio or sun tour)

  28. #28
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    "Value" is really subjective. These days, I try to come out of the gate with a frame I like and a fork and shock I like long-term. Dampers aren't so expensive to replace, if they're compatible, and wheels are kind of a lost cause. I'd also like to have a nice drivetrain and brakes. While it's not so hard to replace a piece or two, it's really annoying. And cranks are expensive.

    Supposedly for a while, people were buying BD bikes to transfer the build kits onto other frames.

    What kind of FS are you looking for? What's your use case? My two are quite different from each other...
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    "Value" is really subjective. These days, I try to come out of the gate with a frame I like and a fork and shock I like long-term. Dampers aren't so expensive to replace, if they're compatible, and wheels are kind of a lost cause. I'd also like to have a nice drivetrain and brakes. While it's not so hard to replace a piece or two, it's really annoying. And cranks are expensive.

    Supposedly for a while, people were buying BD bikes to transfer the build kits onto other frames.

    What kind of FS are you looking for? What's your use case? My two are quite different from each other...
    Trail bike with 120mm or more travel

  30. #30
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    "My" brand does three of those, and they're pretty different from each other. There's a less expensive one, a lighter, better-pedaling one, and a heavier, stiffer one.

    Does trail mean, "XC, but I see XC as not really mountain biking and won't be racing," or "I ride up fire roads and down flow lines with jumps," or something in between?

    What I'm trying to get at is how you feel about climbing and whether you'd rather climb trails, which might take longer, or climb roads and get more laps in. And, what you're looking for in your descending - wheels on or off the ground, how rough it is, etc.

    What about wheel size?
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

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    I'm thinking 29 or 27.5 wheels. Steep climbs and descents all on single tracks, wanna be able to do 5' drops sometimes

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    "My" brand does three of those, and they're pretty different from each other. There's a less expensive one, a lighter, better-pedaling one, and a heavier, stiffer one.

    Does trail mean, "XC, but I see XC as not really mountain biking and won't be racing," or "I ride up fire roads and down flow lines with jumps," or something in between?

    What I'm trying to get at is how you feel about climbing and whether you'd rather climb trails, which might take longer, or climb roads and get more laps in. And, what you're looking for in your descending - wheels on or off the ground, how rough it is, etc.

    What about wheel size?
    Now reveal the secret brand!

  33. #33
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    Kona. It's one of the higher-end brands my team's main shop sponsor carries.

    I haven't tried the Precept or the Hei Hei Trail. I have a '13 Hei Hei, which is a 100 mm bike. I'll do rollable drops with nice transitions on it, but it's not as forgiving as my Process 134.

    I like the Process 111 okay, but not as well as the 134.

    Obviously with any of these bikes if you buy this year's, your dollar won't go as far on components as on a consumer direct bike, especially a discount brand. You can look for last year's or get one secondhand if you want to spend less money.

    I think rear suspension is mature enough that the majors aren't producing bad ones anymore. I don't think it's mature enough for the discount consumer-direct brands to be doing it well. But that's something you have to get comfortable with for yourself and your idea of value - how important is the rear linkage design vs. the stuff that's on the bike when it comes out of the box?
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    Kona. It's one of the higher-end brands my team's main shop sponsor carries.

    I haven't tried the Precept or the Hei Hei Trail. I have a '13 Hei Hei, which is a 100 mm bike. I'll do rollable drops with nice transitions on it, but it's not as forgiving as my Process 134

    I like the Process 111 okay, but not as well as the 134.

    Obviously with any of these bikes if you buy this year's, your dollar won't go as far on components as on a consumer direct bike, especially a discount brand. You can look for last year's or get one secondhand if you want to spend less money.

    I think rear suspension is mature enough that the majors aren't producing bad ones anymore. I don't think it's mature enough for the discount consumer-direct brands to be doing it well. But that's something you have to get comfortable with for yourself and your idea of value - how important is the rear linkage design vs. the stuff that's on the bike when it comes out of the box?
    Ok, where would be the place to look for deals or last year close outs. Remember I'm on a small island in Hawaii so shipping WILL be a factor.

  35. #35
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    Last year's bikes are something a local shop got stuck with. They guesstimate what they'll sell, and what they need on the floor for a given season and buy them. But if they have a 2015 still, now it's just taking space. This is a bigger problem for shops that change business models seasonally. I doubt that applies where you are, but where I am, some shops have been taking down their ski displays in favor of bikes and will go back the other way in the Fall.

    I'm not sure where in Hawaii you are. But there's a rental bike business model that can end up with a lot of bikes to get rid of once a year too. In not too long (which is kind of ridiculous) some of the '17s are going to start coming out. Usually the lower-end bikes first. If there are rental businesses near you that always rent current-year bikes, their '16s may be on sale, or will be soon.

    Nothing is ever free: you need to make some phone calls and do some leg work.
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  36. #36
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    Kauai, and there's no good deals locally.. on anything. Im not joking. Has to be mail order.

  37. #37
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    I remember my business studies course project on Nike. In the 1990's they tried to land every shoe on North American soil for no more than $25.00

    So a $250 shoe costs $25 to make.

    That's right. The rest goes to Michael Jordan.

    That's how BD can offer lower prices.
    They have no Michael Jordan.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by watts888 View Post
    Jack Daniels makes bikes?
    OMG the Jack I was drinking to gain courage in pressing the order button on a poorly engineered & poorly equipped beginner level non modern geo (not) Motobecane HAL6 (priced at least half of any competition also having Pike fork and RC3 rear shock etc) almost came up through my nose LOL .

    Even if the frame turns out to be noodles (doubtful), replace with a worthy one and and still come out ahead.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by rvsixer View Post
    OMG the Jack I was drinking to gain courage in pressing the order button on a poorly engineered & poorly equipped beginner level non modern geo (not) Motobecane HAL6 (priced at least half of any competition also having Pike fork and RC3 rear shock etc) almost came up through my nose LOL .

    Even if the frame turns out to be noodles (doubtful), replace with a worthy one and and still come out ahead.
    LOL, so did you push the button as JD flowed out your nose onto the keyboard?

  40. #40
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    Was going for it, but sadly only the nostril color is available in XL right now.

    Hopefully they will open greys up again before raising the price .

  41. #41
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    Just get the green! Better looking anyway, silver is boring.

  42. #42
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    Ghastly Green lol. Color aside, worried the frame may be a little small.

    I am 6'4" with 36" inseam, a 50cm 'XL' frame just seems incorrect. If the BB standover/BB height numbers are to be believed, it has to be bigger than 50cm .

    I have already noted several specification discrepancies in the published specs (i.e. effective TT is stated as being 627mm on spec sheet, product page says 635mm).

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by rvsixer View Post
    Ghastly Green lol. Color aside, worried the frame may be a little small.

    I am 6'4" with 36" inseam, a 50cm 'XL' frame just seems incorrect. If the BB standover/BB height numbers are to be believed, it has to be bigger than 50cm .

    I have already noted several specification discrepancies in the published specs (i.e. effective TT is stated as being 627mm on spec sheet, product page says 635mm).
    Check the site again, looks the there's more dark silver XLs in! Take a shot and push the buy button quick!

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cc in Hawaii View Post
    Check the site again, looks the there's more dark silver XLs in! Take a shot and push the buy button quick!
    Been continously hitting refresh since 4am, no dark silver XL's have shown up...

  45. #45
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    Motobecane bikes are owned by beginners !!!-image.jpg
    Quote Originally Posted by rvsixer View Post
    Been continously hitting refresh since 4am, no dark silver XL's have shown up...
    Here it is in my cart!

  46. #46
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    Wth ???

    Here's all I get. IE, chrome, firefox on PC & Safari on iPad/iPhone. What browser are you using?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Motobecane bikes are owned by beginners !!!-hal6.jpg  


  47. #47
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    I don't see a reason not to buy that bike, it is freaking sick. Worse case you get a new frame down the line, all the comps seem great. You won't get free tune-ups for life like you can buying from an LBS but find a good one and they will take great care of your bike. Realize, that it may have some scratches etc, but it's a bike so don't lose your sh!t. You should take it there initially to have it checked out, be cool, talk to them, tell them what your plans are with the bike etc. See if they have basic maintenance classes. Learn how to do your own fixes and you'll be better off anyway.

    I would not advise someone to buy a low end Motobecane, but that bike you bought is worth the few problems you may have.
    I'm sick of all the Irish stereotypes, as soon as I finish this beer I"m punching someone

  48. #48
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    Since no XL silver's show up when I try to order online, yet they do for cc, I decide to fax my order in. Get a call back immediately that XL is sold out in silver.

    Gonna take a lot of Jack to order green tonight LOL.

  49. #49
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    Motobecane bikes are owned by beginners !!!

    Quote Originally Posted by rvsixer View Post
    Since no XL silver's show up when I try to order online, yet they do for cc, I decide to fax my order in. Get a call back immediately that XL is sold out in silver.

    Gonna take a lot of Jack to order green tonight LOL.
    I have a green bike, I didn't want that color either but now it's fine. I live my bike, couldn't care if it was purple green yellow whatever. The only weird thing is I feel that I can only wear black or grey when I ride


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    Last edited by sfgiantsfan; 05-27-2016 at 08:13 PM.
    I'm sick of all the Irish stereotypes, as soon as I finish this beer I"m punching someone

  50. #50
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    I'm not usually a fan of green but that bike does look really good in green/black, plus the grey is blah. Seems like a no brainer.

  51. #51
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    That bike is a great steal.

  52. #52
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    I think it's funny - many years ago (1989) when I started biking, the bikes were not near the quality that even some of the cheap bikes are now.......I've had my Moto Ti Fly 29er frame for a while now and put it through some punishment, and it's held up just fine for a "beginner" bike.........
    Rigid 29er Ti SS / 29er SC Tallboy AL

  53. #53
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    Well, I have had 2 Motos, and am very happy.
    Been riding for 15 years or so, current bike is a Fantom Ti - best bike I have ever had.
    I also have a Santa Cruz Blur XC carbon, but I like to ride the fantom more than the SC.
    Not to say the SC is bad, but the fantom is a really good bike.
    There are some low dollar bikes from Moto, but you still get more bang for your buck from them. I have several friends that bought a Moto - and they are happy as hell. The grin on their faces when they ride is almost blinding.
    Women and cats will do as they please, and men and dogs should relax and get used to the idea.
    -- Robert Heinlein --

  54. #54
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    I think BD does a good job of keeping up with the trends, but their frame tech is definitely lacking. That being said, I'm a big fan. I sold my Specialized Stumpjumper FSR to buy two Motobecane hard tails to try to convince my wife having a quality bike makes a difference. Her, having come from a WalMart type bike this was an eye opener. That being said, it's been 8 years, thousands of miles, and 3 newer way more expensive bikes and she still loves the thing. Hell, I still ride around my 500ht too at least once a week. We upgraded to hydraulic disc brakes, but stock otherwise. They are quality bikes, definitely a tad heavier, but at the price you have nothing to lose. I've been riding for 22 years and price to fun ratio is hard to beat. Also having my name brand bikes being stolen before(with 1 if not 2 locks)... I often ride around with the Motobecane and don't lock it and hasn't been stolen yet.

  55. #55
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    i sincerely hope that statement is true... I always want to be labeled a beginner...

  56. #56
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    Motobecanes are the real deal..no BS!

    Complete rubbish! I love these BS comments from those who are ignorant to the facts. Here's my IMHO rant...

    My first bike was a Cannondale SM700 stiffy and I loved every single ride. A douchebag stole it from my garage in 1999 so I bought a Cannondale F500, not the best ride so I decided to trade up to a Stumpy FSR Comp. I changed the crappy Shimano crank, LX derailleurs and shifters to all XTR, changed out the wheels to Crank Bros Cobalts and then added KS seat dropper. Loved the bike but even though it was a size L it just never really fit me right. Never really was able dial it in to get the shocks to handle my weight. At 185...okay 195 (depends on my wife's monthly cycle) it should have been able to handle it without a problem.

    In 2011 I had an opportunity to purchase a Ibis Mojo SL from a friend that lost his job and needed the cash quick. I loved the idea of owning an Ibis, but the first long ride had me questioning the reality of ridding an Ibis. I felt like I was perched up on the bike and was never able to feel comfortable or confident enough to push the bike to my limits. Additionally, the damn thing had 150mm of travel on the stanchions and I could not keep the front wheel on the ground while in a climb. Basically, I really hated to ride it but loved owning it. I finally decided I needed to sell both of them for something that served me better. I kicked many tires and wanted XT group or better. Went to a Santa Cruz dealer and I was quoted $6900 + tax, so I asked for full XTR and the price was over $8k...seriously WTF! SC's are really nice but not $9K (after tax) nice. I was already thinking the Motobecane may just be the ticket with full XTR at a whopping $6k less. I took a chance and bought a Fantom 29er DS 4by4 Full XTR and I will say without any doubt, it's the best bike I have ever owned and have no regrets. I did make a few modifications, RockShox Reverb seat dropper, Crank Bros. Cobalts Vittoria Barzo's and a 203 front rotor. With that said, I've had a bunch of my riding buds give me sh!t about my boxed mail order bike, comparing it to a Huffy. Most are on Specialized and a few on Treks. What, like your Trek didn't arrive in a box!?!? Needless to say, I love proving them embarrassingly wrong! After a bunch of smack talk about quality and bad components the conversation inevitably always goes like this.

    Let's find common ground...all bikes, like a computer for example, are a sum of their parts. So lets start with the frame. Sure it's made in Taiwan, but do you know who actually makes it? Of course not! Kinesis makes not only their own and Motobecane frames but they also build frames for Diamondback, Felt, GT, Haro, Ideal, Jamis, K2, Kona, Kross, Raleigh, Redline Bicycles, Santa Cruz, Schwinn, Storck, Sunn, Titus Cycles, Torker, and yes, even Trek! So we can agree they know how to make frames and quality of the frame isn't really a problem. Geometry is up to the buyer so it's not part of the argument. Soo, then the components are in question..? Your Trek EX8 has nice stuff, LX shifters, LX front and a snazzy XT on the rear, the crank is Shimano something, mid-level Avid brakes and a whole bunch of Bontrager for a nice bike...really, it's a nice bike but for $3500 after tax...not so much. My Motobecane has full XTR (excluding the wheels and hubs) and it cost me $500 less than your Trek. That's the moment you can see the flood of buyers remorse flow across their face and the oh crap, I could have had a V8! I do the nice thing and insist they ride it and that seals the deal. Don't misunderstand me, the frame of a Pivot or an Intense is nothing short of a piece of art with amazing engineering to back up the design. But for the way I ride, these impressive frames just don't add any inches to my johnson so what is the point!

    I'm a decent weekend rider, I will try anything once. I've taken my Motobecane down Downieville (not during the race), South Yuba, White Cloud, all over the Santa Cruz mountains and Annadel State Park and so far there is nothing this bike can't do! It's amazingly fast, nimble and highly capable. I've put about 1000 miles on it over the past year and not one problem. I recently had a chance to snag an amazing deal on a new Fly Team Ti 29er with X0 and I am blown away on how this bike performs! On my Motobecane's, I've never felt more confident in my abilities and am willing to push the limit. The moral of the story is, Motobecane's are outstanding bikes without the je ne sais qua of a dealer bought bike. If you think owning a $9k Santa Cruz makes you more of a man, then Bruce may actually be a women after all. In every case, so far, the naysayers never owned or ridden one and they actually have only a twisted preconceived notion as to what Motobecane's really are - AndrwSwitch is a bit of our case-in-point.

    Fact is, I can easily outperform bikes costing 2x as much and that gives me a whole lot of satisfaction that I can take to the bank!

    What could be better on Motobecanes, you might ask?
    - Cable routing, I prefer internal like Trek's, Pivot.
    - Add a quality seat dropper in the price and it should have internal routing for the remote.
    - The Vuleta wheels are just okay, certainly not great. I always swap for CB Cobalts...I just love their wheels, just the right amount of bling and ideal wheels for running tubeless!
    Last edited by Aguster; 05-22-2017 at 03:42 AM.

  57. #57
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    I once was one of those folks that scoffed at Motos while I rode my Treks and C'Dales. I came from a BMX background at a young age so I rode most of my life.... BMX, road, XC, Enduro/AM and now mostly just trail. I swore by Treks and owned 2... a Wahoo HT 29r and FS Fuel 8. After a near decade hiatus (with mostly super light trivial rides during that time), I decided to get back into mtb'ing but decided on a Moto because I was more budget conscious. The fact was, my mind was already preset to assume the FS Moto (Hal5 Comp) that I picked up was going to be a generic ride and nowhere near capable as compared to all my previous bikes. Boy, was I so wrong. It rides just as good, if not better than any of my previous bikes. Ultimately I became a believer in Motos. This is not to say that all their bikes are good. Rather, I think if you pick up one of their upper end bikes, you will be pleasantly surprised at their performance and how much of a steal you got it at.

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cc in Hawaii View Post
    Wow! so you tell US, are these frames as good as the big names of specialized, trek, and Giant?
    If you like the geometry, they are. They are all made by the same few manufactures.....

    What you don't get is some of the latest "standards"...IE Boost spacing, wider bars with shorter stems, PF bottom brackets, latest geometry....etc when you are comparing what would be like machines. Most folks look at the derailleurs and say...wow that has an Shimano XT setup and is XXX cheaper than Brand Y.

    That is not a rip on Bikes Direct. I love bikes direct. They offer solid values and great service after the sale. It just is what it is. They are slow to adopt to the new trends...which is OK as what they sell is proven.

  59. #59
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    Actually they already have boost spacing, but I'll admit, I was kinda surprised to see that so quick. In general, I think you are right though as they aren't really doing any industry leading innovation. Seems like you will be waiting at least a year for models to come out with "the next big thing", and in some cases like internal cable routing, a lot longer than that.

    Really though, that adds no justification to the "motobecane bikes are owned by beginners" sentiment. As with most things, if you want cutting edge and the absolute newest thing right away, you'll be paying a premium for it with another brand. That doesn't make anyone not willing to pay that premium any less serious or capable.

  60. #60
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    Their titanium hardtails are a good deal.

    Not much innovation needed for hardtails in general if you ask me. 142x12 rear is pretty much it. I don't count the trend of slacker headtube angles which can be achieved with a longer fork.


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  61. #61
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    Beginner or Mechanically Inclined?

    Started riding at 56 yo and first bike was GT Avalanche 2.0, a price point entry level bike. Did not take long to change bikes. Avalanche was strong and cheap. Everyone said "you're old, get a plush FS high end and be done with it". Second bike was Specialized S-Works Stumpjumper FSR that weighs 23 lb. Adding to the collection was a 2017 Motobecane Titanium Night Train Bullet last November. Bike out of the box was 34 lbs with pedals. I liked the bike out of the box but have since highly modified it.
    I removed the Ritchey al bars and stem. I replaced them with a Chrommag Cutlass 740mm low rise carbon bar and Easton EA70, 70mm 6 deg up stem plus larger dia clamp on grips. Replaced Ritchey seat post and low end WTB rocket saddle with a 125mm KS i900 I had laying around and a WTB Pure V Pro saddle. Now cockpit feels the same as Stumpy.
    I replace the 2X11 Race Face Turbine with a Luna BBSHD mid drive with 42 tooth Liekie narrow wide chainring and 52 v Li Mn battery.
    I converted the Maxxis Minion 4.8 FBF to tubeless and replaced the back tire with a tubeless Vee Tire 4.7 Mission and added plastic fenders. Rear drive remains 11 X42 OEM
    Since March 30 I have ridden the bike 1024 miles. 90% of those miles are on bike path/roads. I have not had any major problems in that time. I am quite satisfied with the Motobecane bike.

  62. #62
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    I love reading these comments as well. I am having this same discussion on another non realated forum. This guy is stating that bikes direct Carbon fiber bikes have rice paper and not carbon fiber in them....telling me of catastrophic failures etc. I own a specialized rockhopper, it's my second frame as my first frame failed by having the head tube literally split in half. I purchased it from the Local specialized dealer at the time. I brought my bike back, after only owning it for like 2 - 3 months and they said it was user abuse. I said WTF? They would not replace the bike, frame etc. Even though Specialized has a 5 year warranty on aluminum frames. I had to fight with Specialized to get a new frame. 3 months out of my riding season. GONE. So, I am willing to take a chance on mail order because LBS give NO better service than BD as far as I am concerned. I have read WAY more positive reviews of real owners on here than negative ones....that's for sure. Most of these owners are coming from "high end" brands like SC/Specialized/TREK etc. Realizing that these companies are now gouging customers for the name. I am willing to take that chance and get 4 bikes for the price of one from the BRAND NAME bikes.

    I told the guy on the other forum. I am ordering either a hal 6 or ghost 29r, if it's a complete turd I will tell him straight up that it is, and yep your right. BUUUTTTTT if it's just as good as other "brand name" bikes, He will be hearing from me as well!!!!!!

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by tk1971 View Post
    Their titanium hardtails are a good deal.

    Not much innovation needed for hardtails in general if you ask me. 142x12 rear is pretty much it. I don't count the trend of slacker headtube angles which can be achieved with a longer fork.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Definitely the frameset is an awesome deal.... But the bikes themselves... hmmmmm they just a fair deal.... They put garbage wheels on their bikes... those Vuelta wheels (which I think they stopped using) are absolute trash... And there are some other parts that suck too like small block 8 tires and the seatposts...

    But if you are building your own bike up from the frameset, its the best deal around for a titanium bike..

  64. #64
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    I have a set of vuelta's on my Specialized rockhopper comp. I find them really good. I replaced the z-32 specialized rims with STX hubs for the Vuleta zerolites. They are lighter, stop better, and feel stiff. Works great. The z's looked like they were coming apart at the join. Maybe not, but.......I cannot see that line in the wheel. It freaks me out. I am going to take the hubs and build a new set of wheels for another bike...

    My wife and I are ordering a bunch of MOTO bikes. We are each getting a hardtail, FS, fat, flatbar crusier and road bike.....I am adding a Tri bike and a second FS. At the prices they are going for, might as well. For the price of one "brand name" FS bike, I can get a bunch of bikes. I am not a brand snob, and the quality of the Moto bikes are quite good!

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