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  1. #26
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    i wish i could afford the ti personally and if i could i agree with slee_stack 100% i have to settle for the alum version..

  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slee_Stack
    Obviously I don't care about the brand name which is why I bought a Moto, so the stickers don't bother me either.
    The interesting thing is…someone went too a great expense at one point in time to purchase a brand name. Motobecane, was as poplar as anyone in it’s day. However, somewhere along the way it seems someone forgot about that and just pushed the value side of the equation too make the sale.

    The frames are good. The component spec sheet are some of the best…and still, the prices are as we all know low, low & low. Still, even with all that going for the bike something is missing and what is missing is the thing that will always hold these bikes back.

    So I guess I could say…why the trouble too purchase brand name like Motobecane, why not just make up your own name and just call it brand XZ or some sh*t like that if you don’t care about the products image?

    With all the things these bike have going for it…Frame quality, component spec & low price. If Motobecane’s image was on par with everything else…you would really have it all.

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  3. #28
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    My dad still has an original, early 80's Motobecane. I was familiar with the brand long before BD came around. My first 'real' bike was a Peugeot.
    I'm still surprised someone hasn't marketed the Peugeot nameplate.

    I'm not necessarily against de-branding. I understand why some do it. There is a certain appeal to a completely clean, logo free, unadorned bicycle frame (or any other product for that matter).

    I would only caution against sticker removal if the end result may very well be an ugly or shoddy looking finish. If you are capable and comfortable though, go for it.

  4. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slee_Stack
    I'm not necessarily against de-branding. I understand why some do it. There is a certain appeal to a completely clean, logo free, unadorned bicycle frame (or any other product for that matter).
    I would wager money that 97% of the de branding going on in this case doesn’t have much to do with loving the clean look. But hey, maybe if we ignore it. It will go away.
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  5. #30
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    guys just remember if there is clearcoat on the whole frame when you remove the stickers you leave a large opening of no clear coat on the frame. normally you will see the difference in sheen and color and also leave the raw ti open to oxidation etc.... i dont think they only clear just the stickers unless im wrong

  6. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by zfactor
    guys just remember if there is clearcoat on the whole frame when you remove the stickers you leave a large opening of no clear coat on the frame. normally you will see the difference in sheen and color and also leave the raw ti open to oxidation etc.... i dont think they only clear just the stickers unless im wrong
    Yeah, the clear coat is the big unspoken factor. To do it right, I'm thinking you'd need to buy a can of clear coat and spot spray where the decals were removed. I may just have to keep the decals because I'm too lazy to go through all of the trouble to do it right. I'm sure that will make the ever so sanctimonious "Moto Rider" happy.

  7. #32
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    it will never look the same as clear coats dont "blend" well, you can use a blending agent but even those usually leave small bubbles or some fish eye's in the paint as its melding it together...

  8. #33
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    Sticker glue removal

    Just put together my bike and not being a kid in elementary school, I too will be removing the BIG Motobecane advertisement. For assistance to those looking to remove the sticker, I haven't gotten to that point, but to give some light on how to remove the sticker glue that may remain, many of the comments I've read here I'm sure will work. One guaranteed way without having to go buy something you will only use for this one purpose, is to use what just about everyone has in there household. Been around for many, many years. it's WD-40.
    Just spray a moderate amount on a paper towel, and rub away. The glue will come off perfectly. Makes a great cleaning agent for stuff like this and has many other uses.
    An old saying...
    if it doesn't move and it should.. WD-40.
    If it moves and it shouldn't... Duct Tape.

  9. #34
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    I agree with the need to remove the adhesive, however I still had 'ghosts' of the down tube decals. It very well could have been UV degradation of the paint after four years. Not a big deal as it's getting painted this winter during snow season.

  10. #35
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    for anyone that has glue to be removed i was 100% serious about the yellow wax thing glue comes right off.

    and after years of sun the sticker would almost for sure have darkened part of the frame or the rest darkened around it..

  11. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by CodyWy
    I'm sure that will make the ever so sanctimonious "Moto Rider" happy.

    Well, I input your comment into a computer program because I don’t always have the correct response and this is the result.

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  12. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by zfactor
    leave the raw ti open to oxidation
    The Ti doesn't oxidize, at least not in the visible rusting/crusting sense.

  13. #38
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    Titaium oxide (dioxide) is bright white colored. I don't imagine anyone wants a 'whitened' blotch on their frame.

    It would still be best to apply a protective coat to it. Or at least wax/polish it.

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slee_Stack
    Titaium oxide (dioxide) is bright white colored. I don't imagine anyone wants a 'whitened' blotch on their frame.

    It would still be best to apply a protective coat to it. Or at least wax/polish it.
    correct. this is why i do not recc it personally.

  15. #40
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    Can someone please post pics of their bikes with the decals removed? THanks

  16. #41
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    I just received my moto ti cross and I'm happy to report that it appears that the decals are over the clearcoat. I am going to try the heat/plastic razor blade method first. I'll post a pic once I'm done (if all goes well...)

    Quote Originally Posted by cjherrman
    Can someone please post pics of their bikes with the decals removed? THanks

  17. #42
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    i would 100% not use a razor blade. if you are not perfectly smooth with it you will leave scratches in the metal.

  18. #43
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    I plan on using plastic razor blades, not metal. They are made specifically for removing pin striping etc. I definitely wouldn't use a metal blade - my hands aren't that steady, even after half a bottle of wine.

    Quote Originally Posted by zfactor
    i would 100% not use a razor blade. if you are not perfectly smooth with it you will leave scratches in the metal.

  19. #44
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    opps my bad i missed that lol.

  20. #45
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    I personally wouldn't take the stickers or badges off a Motobecane myself,I think as far as stickers,badges and such go Motobecane's look really nice and clean...especially compared to some other brands that should remain nameless.Still,I can understand going with the stealth look,especially if it's Ti or black anodized.Shoot,I am building up a 2001 Schwinn Homegrown 'factory" frame which is black anodized and would look way cool stealthy,but I can't bring myself to remove the stickers or badges even though I'm sure I'll get some grief for building up a Schwinn with high end components because some people won't be able to differentiate between a classic, beautiful scandium frame from the stuff they sell at dept. stores.That's OK though,if they can't tell the difference that's their problem,not mine.

  21. #46
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    I opened a bottle of wine and downed a couple of glasses. I put on some Bach. When everything felt right, I fired up my girlfriend's hair dryer, grabbed a plastic razor blade, and went to work...
    Forget about using plastic razor blades and a hair dryer to remove decals on a moto ti cross. Stick with a half a bottle of wine. Plus about another bottle. Use the hair dryer to give yourself really big hair, and then pretend to slash your wrists with a plastic razor blade.

  22. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by CodyWy
    I opened a bottle of wine and downed a couple of glasses. I put on some Bach. When everything felt right, I fired up my girlfriend's hair dryer, grabbed a plastic razor blade, and went to work...
    Forget about using plastic razor blades and a hair dryer to remove decals on a moto ti cross. Stick with a half a bottle of wine. Plus about another bottle. Use the hair dryer to give yourself really big hair, and then pretend to slash your wrists with a plastic razor blade.

    Sad but funny!
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  23. #48
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    I guess some do like the stealth look. For myself, I never contemplated removing the brand name. However, I do know more about the history behind the name then most and I kind of like the history aspect about it. Sure, you have the ones who will dismiss it as just a name. I can only say…all you need to do is look at the name Indian.

    No matter how many times that name changes hands…it will always be regarded as the same as the original. If not they couldn’t sell for $25000+ LOL!

    I say, be proud and give them a history lesson.
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  24. #49
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    I may be keeping the decals. We'll see.
    I am not certain but there seems to be a very thin clearcoat over them. Compared to my mtn bike, the edges of the decals on the ti bike are more prominent, which made me think they were over the clearcoat. It almost feels as though you could scrape them off but that proved to be an illusion.
    I guess I could try the Cirtristrip but it still isn't clear to me if the dude who tried this removed the clearcoat along with the decals, or only the decals.
    Input would be appreciated, if you know. Thanks.

  25. #50
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim FtCO
    Titanium is an absolutely *gorgeous* metal, functionally and aethestically... I took my decals off to let as much of that beautiful lustre and sheen come through.

    My experience with the Fly Team Ti, which took about 30 minutes, including set-time for the Citristrip, and which I did OUTSIDE (with a respirator, to boot - yes, I'm paranoid about this kind of stuff, even if the solvent is considered a "safer" product, whatever that means):

    Decals: Citristrip - which has a nice stays-where-you-put-it gel consistency, so unless you're sloppy, it's not going to be leaching all over the tubes and into places you absolutely don't want a highly effective solvent getting into. Follow the label directions, and the decals will wipe right off without the need for any abrasion or (yikes!) scraping. If you do the removal with the cables/housings/hoses still on, make sure you mask or, better yet, simply don't get the Citristrip on the housings as it will soften/dissolve them. You may need to repeat the application of Citristrip once or twice, depending on how thick you make each application and how long you leave it on to dissolve. To remove the "ghosting" of the letters that might persist after the macro removal, dab some Citristrip on a soft rag and keep rubbing the outlines with even pressure in a circular motion.

    Head tube badge: Blow a hairdryer on the headbadge so it loosens up the adhesive, and, when sufficiently soft/loosened, pull it off. You may need to "tease" the badge off, by which I mean you lift the badge off a little at a time, apply heat, lift, apply heat, lift, etc. Be careful to not burn yourself as the headbadge and surrounding area will get very hot. Any adhesive gum remaining on the headtube after removal of the badge can be removed with Citristrip, Goo-Gone, or similar solvents.

    To deactivate Citristrip residue and for general cleanup, soak a rag with isopropyl (rubbing) alcohol and wipe down areas that were in contact with the Citristrip.

    Separate but related: I wash my bikes with Ice Wax (or is Ice Wash? - I think Armor All makes it) car wash. Bought the big jug at Costco. I find it works great at removing dirt and grime with its detergency, and the protective thin wax it leaves behind makes the bikes (esp the Fly Ti) sparkle, and must help to slough off mud, grime, and sweat, certainly make subsequent washings more effective. However, it will not re-lube the chain, derailleur, sliders, and pivots for you, and it will not prevent damage done by a pressure washer used incorrectly, so all the other do's and don't-do's associated with prudent bicycle cleaning and upkeep still apply.
    Did the Citristrip remove only the decals, or did it remove the decals and a layer of clearcoat over them? Please tell.

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