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  1. #1
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    Just received and rode new Dawes 1200 Haymaker

    It was a positive experience overall. Bike came fast. Asymbly was easy mostly built. Had to adjust disc brakes as they were not dialed in. deraileurs however were dialed in.

    I have owned high end Yeti and Giant bikes but now I am married and I am on more of a budget.

    I can say that for 370 you get quite a bike. Shifting was flawless... Fork is kinda crap though front suntour has no dampning so kind of like having a trampoline on the front of the bike. However I just adjusted the preload pretty high and all peddle bob gone and only engadges on a bump. This was not a suprise however I read from other folks about that fork.

    The shifting on the 1200 haymaker\Deore setup is really good! I compare to my high end yeti that had Deore and XT build and smotheness is the same... Lets see if it lasts the test of time.

    All and all... good damn bike for the money. I'm going to replace the fork just because it really bugs me.

    I would most definitely do business with bikesdirect.com

    just though I would pass the word in case anyone else is thinking of pulling the trigger.
    Last edited by mtb_mangler; 07-18-2012 at 08:34 AM. Reason: wrong price!

  2. #2
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    additional tidbits to my review:

    Haymaker Geometry seems and feels like a very agile cross country bike. Turning is very very responsive. I will have to get used to that.

    Wheel base seems a tad narrow compared to my other bikes, seat post angle, and headset angle both firmly in the crosscountry agile range.

    Which is what I was fishing for. Before you pull that trigger on buying from DB remember that you cannot test ride. Look at the bike geometry for the bike you are buying and compare that to reccomended stats for the type of riding you wish to do. I.E. All mountain, downhill, crosscountry.

    It is going to take some time to get used to my very agaile bike but I'm having fun doing it!

  3. #3
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    Update: Front disc brakes continues to be a pain in the rump. After first adjustment to get rid of rubbing prior to second ride of new bike I noticed it had returned to rubbing. This time adjustment proved to be more of a pain. had to undue not just caliper adjusting allen but also mount bolts, clinch brakes, then tighten. Rubbing has gone away but hoping I won't have to do this each ride. I do expect a certain breakin with any new bike but to be honest this is the first disc set I have to dial in twice!

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the update mangler. I'll let you know how it goes for me once I get my Haymaker assembled and take it for a ride. Unfortunately, frequent adjustments seem to be the norm based on what I've read about the Tektro brakes.

  5. #5
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    I have a set of Avid BB5's on my back disc thats about the same way. I can't stop it from the occasional "ca-ching" noise, and it pulls on the rotor when I squeeze the brake lever.
    I tryed every adjustment to no avail. My front is fine,only the back. Guess thats just the nature of some of these brakes.
    metalmorphasis

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by METALMORPHASIS View Post
    I have a set of Avid BB5's on my back disc thats about the same way. I can't stop it from the occasional "ca-ching" noise, and it pulls on the rotor when I squeeze the brake lever.
    I tryed every adjustment to no avail. My front is fine,only the back. Guess thats just the nature of some of these brakes.
    If it's "pulling" the brake lever around as well- the rotor is very likely bent.

  7. #7
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    No, the brake lever has no movement and the rotor is flat and straight. When I squeeze down on the lever the rotor bends slightly inward towards the spokes,then an occasional rub/squeak.
    It isn't really a big deal but sometimes is annoying.
    Maybe I will stick a set of BB7's on after I wear these out a bit more.
    metalmorphasis

  8. #8
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    If the rotor is bending in, it's means the caliper isn't centered over it. You see the big hex screw on the caliper on the right side (facing the spokes)? Use that to set the stationary pad's position. You want it close enough that the pad that moves (the one connected to your lever) doesn't have to bend the rotor to force it to make contact with the stationary one.

    Once you adjust the stationary one to be closer, you may have to adjust the cable length a bit, depending.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by .bg. View Post
    If the rotor is bending in, it's means the caliper isn't centered over it. You see the big hex screw on the caliper on the right side (facing the spokes)? Use that to set the stationary pad's position. You want it close enough that the pad that moves (the one connected to your lever) doesn't have to bend the rotor to force it to make contact with the stationary one.

    Once you adjust the stationary one to be closer, you may have to adjust the cable length a bit, depending.
    This is correct I reccomend looking in the brakes forum here. Lots of good write ups on how to dial in your brakes. I do not accept any rubbing on the brakes as normal and in most cases simple adjustment is all it takes.

    My third ride with my Dawes was perfect. Brakes stayed from last adjustment. Also went on some gnarlier trails with intricate roots both to see how the hard tail and the tires would do.

    I'm very pleased, sure you have to shift weight off the rear tire a little more than on a good full suspension but all and all my butt did just fine and will most likely return to that trail today.

  10. #10
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    Update:

    After 20 or so rides on some pretty technical trails I can say I am very pleased with this bike. Shifting still flawless from day 1. disc brakes have been maintenance free. Frame has held up from my fat ass hitting logs and the occasional epic superman crash. For the money it is hard to imagine a better deal than this bike.

  11. #11
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    I am glad to see there are other people out there lawn darting them selves off of their BD bikes...only to find that the only damage done was to them selves and not the bike!

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