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  1. #1
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    how much work to expect when buying a BD bike

    So I helped a friend build his BD bike. Was a $300 roadbike.. This was what was necessary.

    install handlebars
    true wheels (pretty nasty out of true)
    adjust brakes
    mount wheels
    inflate tires
    adjust front and rear derailleur.
    install pedals.

    These are things I think every rider should learn ne way (what happens when you bend your wheel/knock your derailleur out 15 miles out on a trail?), but their is some time and dedication involved. Just look stuff up on youtube. Still think they are very worth the money saved.

  2. #2
    Clyde on a mission!
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    Grease what needs to be greased, lube what needs to be lubed. Tighten every nut and bolt properly. Torque the bolts that need a certain torque. Make sure the big nuts at the top of the head tube isn't so tight that they squeeze/crush the bearings and not so loose that the fork can wobble.

  3. #3
    SoCal Rider
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    Yup definitely torque everything on there....even what's pre-installed. I failed to double check the pre-installed bottom bracket before my Fantom Pro 29er's first ride. It started creaking out on the trail and seemed one of the sides was only hand-tight. :/ I like to remove the stock grease off the chain with a degreaser and put the good stuff on. i.e. Rock & Roll

    Also remove: Reflectors, Stickers, Dork Disc. Air up the shocks (if any) according to your weight and set sag properly.

  4. #4
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    I built-up a Vent Noir road bike for a buddy. To do it right:

    Install the various parts, grease the bolts, etc.
    Remove tires/baby-powder tubes, check rim-tape
    Check wheels for true
    Check wheel bearings (if you can)
    Air up tires
    Adj. f./r. derailleur tension/set screws
    Adj. brakes
    Hit all nuts/bolts
    Grease seatpost

    This is what any good shop mechanic would do to a new bike. I think BD woefully understates what is involved in putting a new bike together out of the box! Its more than the h-bars!
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

  5. #5
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    Here's my build of Fantom Cross Uno:
    BikesDirect to Destruction: Building it!

    I agree that to do it right, there's more than BD is letting on(especially canti brake adjustment).

  6. #6
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    ^^^Yep. They are a bit deceiving and I think they lead the buying to believe that you are getting a "pro build" like you can get from Speedgoat, Jenson, etc. This is where someone does what I listed, then takes out the seatpost, removes the front wheel, and removes the stem/handlebar before shipping it to you. The BD bikes come "raw" from the factory and need a bit more than you think to be right.
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

  7. #7
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    Grease the seatpost... Doh! Back out to the garage I go.

  8. #8
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    Yep..don't forget to do that or that seatpost and frame will be forever joined in holy matrimony!
    Geologist by trade...bicycle mechanic (former) by the grace of God!

    2012 Specialized Stumpy EVO 29 HT

  9. #9
    Clyde on a mission!
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    When you mount the handlebar, you typically fix the handlebar to the stem with a bracket with four bolts. Some stems and brackets have only two bolts, but four bolts is the most common. Make sure that the gap between the bracket and the stem is the same above and below the handlebar.

    If you end up with a small gap at the top and a large gap at the bottom it creates uneven strain on the bolts and you risk breaking them, so eyeball the gaps and adjust the bolts if needed.

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