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Thread: Fly Ti weight

  1. #1
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    Fly Ti weight

    Unfortunately I did not weight the complete bike (18") as it came out of the box. The first time I checked it was after I have installed SLX cranks and XTR pedals. Turned out to be 9.61kg(21.19lb). I have removed half a kilo of stickers from the wheel rims.

    If one to believe FSA and Shimano published weights, crank added 889 - 750 = 139g (and difference in sale and buy price was $260), and pedals 325g. That puts the shipped bike at 9.15kg (20.17lb). You can save 55g for $10 by buying Nashbar bolt-on skewers - they should be standard equipment IMO - safer, stronger, easier to install (and same to remove). For $35 for thicker Ti bolt on at 46g will put the shipped 18" at exactly 20lb.

    Now I want it with the stock tires and pedal to get to 20.5lb without exceeding much of the original cost - Ti granny, Al chainring bolts, lighter seat clamp, G3 Avid rotors, Crank Brothers headset and 15m off the steerer, and probably Thompson Masterpiece seatpost should do the trick.

  2. #2
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    That is going to be a rad bike.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by VTECnical
    That is going to be a rad bike.
    Trying to decide what saddle to use. So far changed cranks to 172.5 XTR (would have kept FSA if it was 170), headset to Crank Brothers Opium, skewers to ControlTech Ti bolt-ons, rim tape to strapping tape, seatpost to Thompson Masterpiece, clamp to KCNC, shifter cables and housing to Alligator iLink. Thinking about Dura-Ace cassette. That should calm down my weight weenie itch.

    It rides really, really well as is. I have no idea why I have wasted money on upgrades.

  4. #4
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    My 20" Flt Ti weighs 22.7 pounds with pedals and my Shimano XT tubless wheels with IRC Serac tires mounted. Weight includes XTR pedals, shorter stem (100mm Thompson) and Monkeylite carbon riser bars( I like wider bars than the stock Richie bars). I can't imagine swapping the sweet carbon FSA cranks for the SLX cranks. The SLX cranks are more freeride, great cranks but not on a Ti XC bike. Also, the Richie seatpost is lighter than the Thompson seatpost on my stumpjumper so I don't see any benefit there either. The cassette is the other mandatory item to switch out if you ride in the mountains.

    You think you removed over a pound of stickers from the wheels?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by snowind
    My 20" Flt Ti weighs 22.7 pounds with pedals and my Shimano XT tubless wheels with IRC Serac tires mounted. Weight includes XTR pedals, shorter stem (100mm Thompson) and Monkeylite carbon riser bars( I like wider bars than the stock Richie bars). I can't imagine swapping the sweet carbon FSA cranks for the SLX cranks. The SLX cranks are more freeride, great cranks but not on a Ti XC bike. Also, the Richie seatpost is lighter than the Thompson seatpost on my stumpjumper so I don't see any benefit there either. The cassette is the other mandatory item to switch out if you ride in the mountains.

    You think you removed over a pound of stickers from the wheels?
    SLX was temporary, it got XTR now. I am skeptical of carbon near the ground. In any case SLX, with an XT granny, weights about 100g more then FSA K-force, and it is probably three times as strong. There is absolutely nothing wrong with using SLX on a Ti XC bike. It also looks better then FSA, in my opinion.

    Thompson Masterpiece is about 50 grams lighter, and I have a use for a stock 31.6 post on another bike and I trust Thompson more and prefer its clamp by a large margin.

    Why is a cassette a mandatory item to change? What makes you believe in that? You gain one 18% lower gear with a 11-32 cassette, which is completely irrelevant on a lightweight hardtail. You lose traction before you run out of gears. I would rather switch the granny to a 21t or 20t if that is a problem, and it is not. Rest assured I do ride in the mountains. 12-27 gives you better spacing of gears, lets you use a medium-cage derailleur for an extra couple gears with your granny (up to the cross chaining limit anyway), it is significantly lighter - especially if I find those 9-speed Dura-Ace ones to stock up, all at the price of not a having a single low gear I never use.

    Yeah, give or a take a pound of stickers. Weight them if you have spare time.
    Last edited by Broccoli; 10-14-2008 at 04:07 PM.

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    Yeah, give or a take a pound of stickers. Weight them if you have spare time.
    If that be the case, I might just take the stickers off my wheels also. Since I have a scale, might as well weigh them also. I'll let you know how much my stickers weigh.

    I don't know anybody here in Rockingham County Virginia that runs a 12-27 cassette. I'm sure there might be some out there I just wouldn't want to. Middle chain ring and 32 cog on back handle most climbs but when you're 3 hours into a ride with a steep climb staring at you, the granny with 32 (maybe even a 34) in back is nice to have.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by snowind
    I don't know anybody here in Rockingham County Virginia that runs a 12-27 cassette. I'm sure there might be some out there I just wouldn't want to. Middle chain ring and 32 cog on back handle most climbs but when you're 3 hours into a ride with a steep climb staring at you, the granny with 32 (maybe even a 34) in back is nice to have.
    I do not know if it is worth it. I have tracked my gear usage on adventure races in Sierra Nevada, some of them with much more then 10 hours on a bike - mostly climbing, and I am pushing the bike (or carrying it on my shoulder) long before I get to need a 22 (rather 24 - I got a couple 24t Boone Ti granny rings that I use) to 32/34.. And that is with a 4" travel full suspension trail bike. I may just switch it to a 12-27 and medium cage derailleur on it (and back to 22t granny) as well when I change its cassette again. Free 50 grams. So for a hardtail intended for shorter rides it was a no brainer to keep the road cassette.

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