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  1. #1
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    Which bike: Fantum29 or 700HT or Winsdor Cliff 4900 ?

    I'm 5'11" 195lbs, 33.5 inseam.
    Looking to get a MTB. Will be mostly used on (bad) roads, uneven sidewalks, brick roads, some curb hopping etc for daily commuting. I'd also like the option of using it on trails at some later point. I dont have a car.

    I decided to splurge and go for a good bike, at the XT level. Did not go for XTR as they cost way more and I heard XTR derailleur is harder to maintain and less rugged.

    So the choices are Motobecane Fantum 29
    Fantum pro 29
    700 HT
    Winsdor Cliff 4900

    First question: Is a 29er better suited for my needs ?

    Of the bikes I have listed, which bikes provide the best value for the money ? Eg., would I notice the difference in the crankset of Fantum pro 29 vs the Fantum 29 ? Which bikes are the most rugged ?
    I'd like the bikes to last a looooooooooong time.

    Also, I assume a full suspension bike would be a bad choice for my needs ?

  2. #2
    mpg
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    I would definitely get the 29er for commuting. The big wheels will be easier. A hard tail is all you need and you can lockout the fork forthe smooth portions of your ride.

    I am completely satisfied with the Fantom 29. I have been documenting my experience at http://motobecanefantom29.blogspot.com/

  3. #3
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    You have quite a wide price range...$450 (Windsor) to $800 (Fantom 29er Pro)

    Based on your description of the type of riding, I would definitely suggest a 29er. Full suspension would be overkill and you'll want to spend at least $800 for a FS rig anyway.

    I would look at either the Fantom 29 or the Windsor Cliff29 Comp...both great bikes

    As far as stepping up to the Fantom 29Pro...the cranks are better but the biggest difference will be the fork. The Tora is a much stiffer (flex wise) than the Dart is more tuneable with the Solo Air spring and low speed compression dampening adjustment.

  4. #4
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    One more thought on the Fantom Pro

    Hydraulic brake system.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by retrobeast
    Hydraulic brake system.
    Is that a pro or a con ?
    They are more expensive, but do I need it ? Does it not require more maintainance ? What about durability ?

  6. #6
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    Hydros vs Mechanicals...my take and experience

    Quote Originally Posted by wearetheborg
    Is that a pro or a con ?
    They are more expensive, but do I need it ? Does it not require more maintainance ? What about durability ?
    The only Mechanical Disc brakes that I have rode/worked on/owned that are even in the same league as good hydros are the Avid BB7's and to a lesser extent the BB5's. The Hayes MX-1's aren't too bad either. The Tektro brakes on the 700HT and Windsor Cliff 4900 are pretty basic and work fair at best. The base 29ers both use the Avid BB5's so I would start there. But having owned Hayes and Avid Hydros and Mechanical disc brakes over the years, the hydros are so much better in modulation, usable power, and fade free performance on long downhill runs (only the BB7's with Avid Speed Dial levers and Flak Jacket housing comes even close).

    The myth that Hydros are more maintenance is just that...a myth. Once set up properly, hydros are a sealed system (mechanicals are not) so they are virtually immune to weather conditions. And the occasional brake flush (annually) and bleeding they may need is easy if you have any mechanical ability at all. If you ride where its wet and muddy, you'll be replacing cables and housing much more often on mechanicals than working on hydros. Last bonus, when all components of the brake system are weighed (Rotors, Calipers, Housing, Cables, Levers, Pads)...Hydros are usually about 1/4lbs to 1/2lbs lighter for front and rear brakes.

  7. #7
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    Also, why would a 29er be better for commuting ? Is it more efficient ?

  8. #8
    mpg
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    I think it would be more efficient. I assume that is why road bikes have 700 mm wheels.

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