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  1. #1
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    Ack! Shipping damage !

    Got my Cliff 28r team (thanks Mike)
    The bike was resting on the chainring at the bottom of the box, and as a result the chainring had made a knifelike incision, and the teeth are worn/"hammered".
    It should been better protected (crankset), it seems every bike would suffer from the same problem.

    I was going to give it to the bike shop for building.

    Its the truVativ Firex 3.1 GXP, 22/32/44T
    Anyone know if the entire crankset needs to be replace or just the chainring ?

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    Last edited by wearetheborg; 10-24-2008 at 06:54 PM.

  2. #2
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    The cranks should be fine, as long as the spider is not warped. A new chainring is probably all you need.
    2012 On One Whippet 650b
    2012 Santa Cruz TRc 650b
    2014 On One Dirty Disco
    2010 Soma Groove
    1987 Haro RS1

  3. #3
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    Take a file to the teeth, smooth it out, and do not worry about it. It will work fine. Old diamond steel for your kitchen knives often works fine.

    If I was replacing the large chain ring every time I knocked it a bit, I would be buying a whole frigging lot of chainrings.

    This edge of the tooth does not bear load, and damage is not nearly substantial enough to cause a chain drop.

    I am trying to remember how my Fly Ti was protected.. It sure was OK...

  4. #4
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    Ugh, man it sure is a bit unpleasant though. I would like to experience
    a flaw free new bike for a while.
    Does anyone have an idea of how much the LBS will charge for
    chainring replacement; or the entire crankset replacement ?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by wearetheborg
    Ugh, man it sure is a bit unpleasant though. I would like to experience
    a flaw free new bike for a while.
    Does anyone have an idea of how much the LBS will charge for
    chainring replacement; or the entire crankset replacement ?
    Dude, it will be flaw free once you file down the burr.

    If you insist, chainring is dead simple to replace. New FSA one (here for example - 44t will set you back $50. Crankset will be from $150 to $300 plus labor, depending on how obnoxious your LBS is. It is very worth your while to read some manuals, get some basic tools, and do everything yourself. (Pay attention to chain pin alignment for rings, they usually have a little bump of sorts that is to be aligned with crank arm)

    Seriously, do not do that.

  6. #6
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    I agree with Curmy but...

    You bought a new bike and have every reason to expect it to be perfect without shipping damage when you open the box . I would not buy anything yourself, you should contact bikesdirect for a new chainring ASAP and just ride the bike as is until you get it. As far as having a bike shop replace the chainring, I highly recommend that you try to replace it yourself. If you are going to get serious about mountian biking you really need to learn to work on your bike. It would also be a good idea to assemble it yourself, and if you are unsure if you did it right take it to the bike shop and ask them to look it over. When you are out on the trail and your chain breaks, or your wheel warps too bad to ride it, or you crash and your bars are crooked etc., you or one of your riding buddies will need to fix it, or you will be walking back to the car. Learning to work on your bike is invaluable for trailside repairs.
    2012 On One Whippet 650b
    2012 Santa Cruz TRc 650b
    2014 On One Dirty Disco
    2010 Soma Groove
    1987 Haro RS1

  7. #7
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    ljsmith, are you serious? The damage is so negligible I'd be glad something that big went half way around the world and arrived in as good a condition as it did.

    Dude, don't bum and spend your time focusing on the 0.01% that is not quite right. Take a file and a few passes, it will be good to go and you'll never know the difference. Smile. File. Ride. Curmy has it right.

    Enjoy the bike!

    Filippo

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ljsmith
    I agree with Curmy but...

    You bought a new bike and have every reason to expect it to be perfect without shipping damage when you open the box .
    That is somewhat my viewpoint too. I do like things to be as close to perfect as I can get
    BTW guys, this is my first "new" bike; hence my desire for it to be perfect is even more. Actually my first new bike was a $80 POS from K-Mart which I absolutely hated. Then I've had 3 used bikes in the $200 range (got one, sold it, got another one etc). I hope this explains my problem with the chainring on my first real new $1000 bike. I've waited 9 years for this bike. I wanted it to be perfect for at least a few weeks

    Perhaps I will ask BD for a token credit to assuage my (slightly) brusied heart



    I would not buy anything yourself, you should contact bikesdirect for a new chainring ASAP and just ride the bike as is until you get it. As far as having a bike shop replace the chainring, I highly recommend that you try to replace it yourself. If you are going to get serious about mountian biking you really need to learn to work on your bike. It would also be a good idea to assemble it yourself, and if you are unsure if you did it right take it to the bike shop and ask them to look it over. When you are out on the trail and your chain breaks, or your wheel warps too bad to ride it, or you crash and your bars are crooked etc., you or one of your riding buddies will need to fix it, or you will be walking back to the car. Learning to work on your bike is invaluable for trailside repairs.
    I am going to learn (more) to work on the bike, I agree that it is required.
    I have done some (very minor) work on my other bikes.


    BTW, how did the bikes you guys got avaoid this problem ?
    There was a foam block inside the box, and I think the rear triangle stays were supposed to be resting on that.
    There was also a broken plastic tie inside the box -- perhaps the foam block was tied to the rear triangle and it broke ?

    Are chainrings interchangeable ? That it, can a FSA or shimano chainring be installed on this (or other MTB) cranksets ?

  9. #9
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    I have ordered several bikes over the internet, but I have never paid attention to how they were packed. I've never had any shipping damage before. Different brands of chainrings are interchangeable. You just need to make sure you get the right bolt pattern for your crankset. Most modern cranksets use the 64/104mm bolt spacing. However the large and middle chainrings are usually machined with ramps and pins and varying tooth heights to work together as a set. So ideally if you are only getting one chainring you will get optimal shifting performance if you get the same one you currently have.

    But if you are not getting a warranty replacement free, I would not go out and buy a new chainring. Just ride the current one and replace it when it is totally worn out.
    2012 On One Whippet 650b
    2012 Santa Cruz TRc 650b
    2014 On One Dirty Disco
    2010 Soma Groove
    1987 Haro RS1

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by wearetheborg
    That is somewhat my viewpoint too. I do like things to be as close to perfect as I can get

    Perhaps I will ask BD for a token credit to assuage my (slightly) brusied heart
    Yup, money or free swag is a just response for what amounts to only a bruised heart

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by wearetheborg
    There was a foam block inside the box, and I think the rear triangle stays were supposed to be resting on that.
    There was also a broken plastic tie inside the box -- perhaps the foam block was tied to the rear triangle and it broke ?
    I think that was it. My Fly Ti and its fancy carbon crank set arrived in perfect shape - which helped me to sell the crank so I could get a proper crank length.

    I know that taking a file to your swanky new bike is hard. You will be a better man after you have done.

    Then you will cross over to the dark side and start hacking off extra seatpost length from your new Thomson, to shave 20g.

    Hopefully you will not get to dropping to a machine shop to manufacture frame parts..

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Curmy
    Then you will cross over to the dark side and start hacking off extra seatpost length from your new Thomson, to shave 20g.

    Hopefully you will not get to dropping to a machine shop to manufacture frame parts..
    HA ! Yeah, I'm not that rich. I decided not to get the thomson for now.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by wearetheborg
    HA ! Yeah, I'm not that rich. I decided not to get the thomson for now.
    For stems and seatposts it is the only brand I trust. It is about $70 delivered for each if you look around, and I would rather skip on coffee then have less then best parts being pointed at my ass and teeth when I hack off things.

    And yeah, I took a hacksaw to the Masterpiece I got for my fly.. I felt a shot of testosterone while doing that.. Very proud of still being a weenie.

    So file the teeth on that crank and feel the pride of REAL bike ownership. It is not really yours until you have modified something.

  14. #14
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    Mike will be sending me a chainring. In the meantime, I need to get the bike assembled at the LBS. Will it harm the chainring if I ride it without filing or should I file it and then give it to the bike shop.
    I'm only asking as I dont have a file and will have to get one.

  15. #15
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    Oh my god.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by wearetheborg
    Mike will be sending me a chainring. In the meantime, I need to get the bike assembled at the LBS. Will it harm the chainring if I ride it without filing or should I file it and then give it to the bike shop.
    I'm only asking as I dont have a file and will have to get one.
    It may harm you, or the chain, if the burr catches it. File it down. Pick up a piece of stone, or use dimaond for your kitchen knives. Or spend $3 for a file, you will use it later when you cut the steering tube for a new fork, or cut our cable housing, etc..

    What part needs to be assembled? Front brake and tuning derailleurs? Since you apparently have ability to use a computer - you have more then enough abilities to do it yourself. Plenty of how-to online - for example on Park Tools website..

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