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  1. #1
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    YBB - what changes/improvements through the years

    I'm considering a "vintage" YBB frame as a replacement for my cracked AL hard-tail (SuperGo AccessMax w/ AMP F-2 fork), and am wondering if there were any particular break-point years for changes that may have occurred. Roughly, I'm looking at the time-frame of '95 - '02, when the frame geometry would have been designed around a 80mm max travel fork.

    Also, any thoughts on how the YBB compares to a Merlin Echo of the same era, which uses the YBB rear suspension? One of those recently sold on eBay if you need a reference. I'd link it, but not sure if that's allowed here.

    Appreciate any thoughts or insight.

  2. #2
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    YBB NewBB

    I have ridden a YBB and I'm trying to convince myself that it what I want over just a 29er hardtail. There are very few opinions on just how well the YBB 29er works out there. Lots of people praising the bike in general ...which people tend to do after they drop that kind of change on a bike. I found this on DreamBike.com:

    "The standard friction shock design (recommended) gets an inch and an eigth of rear end travel. Air shock YBB frames get one inch of well-tuned travel. "

  3. #3
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    get the serial number from the seller, and then call out to Steamboat. they'll be able to tell you the DOM and what fork it was designed around. 2003 was the switchover from 80mm to 100mm front ends.
    Civilization ends at the waterline. Beyond that, we all enter the food chain, and not always right at the top.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by cjn1014
    get the serial number from the seller, and then call out to Steamboat. they'll be able to tell you the DOM and what fork it was designed around. 2003 was the switchover from 80mm to 100mm front ends.
    Yep, already been in touch with Kassi and she confirmed that the 2002 I was looking at was indeed built for a 80mm fork.

    Both other than the fork travel dictating a geometry change, has there been any change in the rear suspension or anything else? Just wondering if, all other things being equal, I should consider a '96 YBB equal to a '02 YBB.

  5. #5
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    Having had an '00 YBB, I can tell you that the frames earlier in your "window" (95-98 or so) were not built around 80mm, but around 60mm, as I researched the same thing before springing for a new frame. I ran a 100mm on it, but that is a different story.

    Moots build quality is second to none, and unless you get one of the first Merlin Echos that had a true YBB rear end and were actually built by Merlin, I'd just go with the Moots. Merlin only built that bike for a year or two before being bought up by Litespeed and then using their own soft tail design.

    GlazedHam-I can give you this opinion on the YBB in general. It is a suspension design that has been around, virtually unchanged in Moots' lineup for almost 20 years. It is simple and effective. It is one of those things that you don't even notice is working until you ride a bike without it, and it isn't that you "feel" it working or not, but after many hours in the saddle, you notice that your ass and back don't hurt as much as on a hard tail. I have a friend whose wife has a YBB and she is forever asking if it is moving when she is riding. He assures her it is, but she can't tell like a "traditional" suspension bike.

    If I had a choice, I'd go with the YBB version. You can always lock it out if you don't want it for a particular ride (though I'd never lock it out). The thing is, if you buy a Mooto-X without it, then decide you want it, you'll have to buy a new frame. If you buy a Mooto-X with it, you can lock it out when you don't want it.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Team Fubar Rider
    Having had an '00 YBB, I can tell you that the frames earlier in your "window" (95-98 or so) were not built around 80mm, but around 60mm, as I researched the same thing before springing for a new frame. I ran a 100mm on it, but that is a different story.
    Thank you, that's helpful as I've seen one from '96 and another from '02.


    Quote Originally Posted by Team Fubar Rider
    Moots build quality is second to none, and unless you get one of the first Merlin Echos that had a true YBB rear end and were actually built by Merlin, I'd just go with the Moots. Merlin only built that bike for a year or two before being bought up by Litespeed and then using their own soft tail design.
    The Echo I've seen is a 2001 and indeed has the YBB rear. I guess I'd prefer a Moots top-to-bottom, but the Merlin seems like it would be a "close enough" option.

    The one I think I've discounted as an option is the Seven Teres which has a "YBB like" suspension, but with pivoting chain-stay ends. I'm thinking they only did this for a short run, as I've only seen just this one...

  7. #7
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    I had a 26" YBB. rode it for years and loved it. Sold it for a pair of MootoX YBBs. Love them.
    As one person already posted- you don't notice it until you are on a bike w/o it.
    Pretty true words.
    The clamp of a YBB can be locked out (infact I've seen Moots call the collar a lock out) so I've ridden w/ it locked and unlocked. It's amazing what that little bit of squish does for comfort.

    If there was a bike out there I liked more, I'd get it. For now? I'm set w/ the YBBs. Of several things I like- the end of the season creak/bearing replacement many full squish riders deal w/... Well that time and expense is used elsewhere w/ a YBB,

    And as for the idea that spending too much (IMO a Moots is too costly) means I have to priase it... well I was pretty happy to sell my Black Sheep. but that's more a reflection of my poor geometry choice, not James' work.
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  8. #8
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    Thanks for the feedback. I've got a 2000 YBB and Marzocchi Atom 80mm fork on the way. So much for my initial idea of transferring the AMP fork over - the Marzocchi and King headset came with the frame, so that's what I'll go with.

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