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Thread: The YBB Ride

  1. #1
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    The YBB Ride

    I prefer a hardtail but I'm intrigued by the YBB.
    Please describe the riding experience, the feel of the YBB.
    I read that it adds about 1/2 pound to the frame -- is this true?
    Are there any other drawbacks?

    Thanks,
    OCDirt

  2. #2
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    I think it adds a bit less than 1/2 lb. My large was 4.25 lbs. The YBB is quite nice but if you do not have a good pedal stroke, you will feel bouncy, especially on smooth trails and pavement. No other drawbacks- definitely nicer on trail chatter than a HT.

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    When you first get a YBB it feels like you are riding with a slow leak, and you may notice a little sag. After a couple of rides you get used to the ride and you realize that you can be lazy and drag you rear wheel over things that before would pop you out of the saddle on a HT. I never feel it on the trails, and rarely feel it out on the roads. You think it's not doing anything till unless you can watch the action from behind and really see how much the YBB moves. The weight is more like 2oz than a 1/2 #. One drawback is the kickback from the YBB if you hit something and load up the srping, it has the tendancy to kick back, and without any rebound dampner, can toss you up out of the saddle, not off the bike but a big compression can wake you up.

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    And don't forget...
    The YBB can also be locked out effectively becoming a hardtail.

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    My take is that it feels like a hardtail with a 3 inch tire out back without the squirminess.

  6. #6
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    I converted mine to singlespeed it was awesome. Don't think of them as a soft-tail just a comfortable hardtail. you'd be fine. Flyer is right it gets a bit bouncy on bad strokes.

  7. #7
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    I had a YBB 26 and LOVED it. Well worth the time it took to find one in my price range.

    Then, I moved to 29" wheels, so I sold the 26 and ordered 2 MootoX YBBs. One for SS, one geared.
    I am crazy about these bikes. A really great ride. Really. And not just as one of those guys who spent too much on a frame and wants to justify it, they really are great.

    I try not to get all caught up in the ego of riding but passing some squishy bike on the ups and downs can be a real treat.

    Additionally- as the season grows old and everyone is thinking about new pivot points and fighting creaks in their dualies- I drop a bit of lube on the slider and keep on smiling. Very low work required to keep 'em rolling. Less than a King hub.

    Short sprints, long 10 hr days. WhiteRim in a day. Whatever. It seems to fit all needs.

    When my cadence is too high, I get a bit of hop out of the rear so.. If you have a great spin? Perhaps test ride first.
    Also- when they compress fully on an uphill you get some rebound that can be disconcerting if you are used to the damp rebound of a dualie.

    If you look at it on a spectrum of travel- it's waaay closer to a hardtail than any dualie. Even to call it a soft tail can be a bit generous. But, you can feel that squish. And when it's not there? I miss it. Yes, I've locked it out and it's lame. To me anyway.
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    As a hardtail enthusiast, I like knowing that all of my pedaling effort is translated into forward motion -- I worry about "losing" some of that energy into the bobbing or bouncing of the YBB -- is this something that you notice on hard climbs?

    Also, going down bumpy trails, I'm usually out of the saddle -- with the YBB, is the quasi full suspension enough to remain comfortably seated, or do you still tend to be off the seat?

    I would love to try out the YBB -- but demo's aren't available -- any advice?

    Thanks,
    OCDirt

  9. #9
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    Yea, I understand the difficulty of riding a demo YBB. If you're ever near Crested Butte, let me know.

    If you worry about wasted energy- you might be disturbed by a bit of flex here and there.

    There are a few guys I know who are all about the dualie situation and still wonder why I'm on some old fashioned hardtail. (But, it's what I like and I don't mind waiting for them at the top or bottom. It's a rare day/trail that I feel outgunned by any other bike. Now rider, that's another story.) Still these FS fans will see the (slight) bob of my YBB on a road and comment on how their 575, 5.5, Blur du jour, etc isn't moving as much. I just ignore it over the creaking of their pivots.
    Either way, I don't miss whatever energy is lost on the YBB. I've never noticed it as a problem.

    But, Moots does use two spring rates. One is stifer than the other. It's not really a rider style thing, more along the line of frame size and rider weight. I think everything above an 18" or so might be the stiffer frame. I ran both on the 26" and either was fine.

    I stand on the downhills also, the slight give of a YBB isn't enough to be able to sit on all but the smoothest DHs.
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  10. #10
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    It's a comfortable ride but...

    YBB is a very comfortable "hard-tail" ride, but it's not to be compared with full suspension bike. It does not bob, bouncing however happen when you mash the pedal. If you have a decent stroke you don't have to worry about it. It doesn't happen only when I get tire and sloppy it happened. Actually, it never happen to me when I stand on the climb either only when seated.

    You still need to stand when descending anything more than smooth fireroad. The bike feels more comfortable than hardtail one is the YBB and another reason is Ti does give a bit. As for the power transfer it doesn't feel 100% like the hardtail but it still more than FS. But when talking about efficiency. it's more efficient than hardtail because not all of the bumps transfer vertically.

    I'm not sure if you would fit on my bike being 6'1" but I have an SS YBB and when I'm in the area or vice versa you can try mine. I love my Moots and the Echo as well. If you are in the market for a new bike have you try any FS or 29er?

  11. #11
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    While I dearly love my YBB, it could use some damping in some circumstances, like pedaling on a washboard surface. I have the standard YBB, not one of the Rockshox equipped ones (would have liked to try one of those for comparison). Then again, I like the simplicity of it's "suspension" and not having to deal with a standard type of shock. It's better than any of the hardtails I had before it (haven't bought another hardtail since), but it's no fs bike either. I got to try an Ibis Silk Ti a few years after I got my YBB, and wished I had held out for that instead. My body prefers my full suspension bikes for most of my riding these days, and I reserve the Moots for smoother trails with lots of climbing.

    Moots doesn't have test bikes any more? I arranged for a test (a real day of riding on some of my favorite local trails) on a bike Moots had on "tour" that I made an appointment for in advance. Wouldn't have spent that much on a bike without a test ride.
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  12. #12
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    My neighbor works for a local shop that has a demo YBB. They have also had a Cinco demo. The OP should ask their local MOOTS dealer about getting one to use for a day.

    I have had my YBB SL for about 7 years now, and keep going back to it. It is just about perfect for me, now. I was having problems with flex, and found much of that coming from my weight weenie wheel set. Stiffer wheels cleared that up. The front end didn't feel right, so I swapped from a Manitou Skareb 80 mm fork to a Fox RL100 and the bike handled much better. I do notice some bob on long flats, but a smooth pedal stroke will solve that.

    Having ridden mostly on hard tails and full rigid since 1984, this bike feels plush. I rode a Trance for a year or so, but have gone back to this bike again. Out of the saddle descending is what I am used to, as is out of the saddle climbing.

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    I live in So Cal and none of the local dealers have any Moots demo bikes.
    I can't picture spending $$$ on a bike without first taking a test drive.

    Thanks for the above responses...

    OCDirt

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    Hey OC dirt - I live in Covina and own an 18" 2005 YBB (100mm fork - essentially the same as the latest models) - if that sounds like it would fit you and you can make it up my way some weekend I think we can work out a test ride.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by OCDirt
    I live in So Cal and none of the local dealers have any Moots demo bikes.
    I can't picture spending $$$ on a bike without first taking a test drive.

    Thanks for the above responses...

    OCDirt
    Hard to believe one of the dealers couldn't get one if you asked; that's how I had to get a demo bike, as they didn't keep any on hand just for demos...
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikinfoolferlife
    Hard to believe one of the dealers couldn't get one if you asked; that's how I had to get a demo bike, as they didn't keep any on hand just for demos...
    That is the same situation with our local dealer. They do not always have the demos because the demos are traveling loaners from MOOTS.

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    Nice of you to offer, nichbooth, but I probably need a 20".
    I used to live up in Claremont, not far from Covina (I think) -- great trails -- I miss riding there.

  18. #18
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    I have a 2003 YBB that I've got 5 digit mileage on and I agree 100% with all the excellent feedback already given. It feels just like a hardtail with a high volume rear tire that is at low pressure (but without the fear of denting your rim). The ease of maintenance is awesome, there's just nothing to go wrong or break on a long ride. I think this last fact is what will keep the soft tail design alive despite the fact that modern FS frames these days give you more travel for not much more weight.

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