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Thread: Moots YBB?

  1. #1
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    Moots YBB?

    I'm thinking about a moots 26" YBB after years on FS 4-5" travel bikes. Will this thing beat me to death after riding full boingers?

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    Short answer - yes.

    You need to ride with a totally different style that works different muscle groups. Personally I have a YBB as well as full boingers and I like the ability to switch and choose as the mood grabs me. If this would be your only bike I'd think long and hard. Slap a 2.7" rear tire on your full sus and lock out the rear suspension - that's pretty much what the 'suspension' of a YBB feels like - a big fat ballon tire without the squirm in corners.

  3. #3
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    I went from a 4" travel XC bike to a RigorMootis, and it does take some getting used to. I love my moots. I have raced it in 24 hour, 12 hours and XC races and i think it is faster than my old FS bike. I have ridden a friends YBB and there is a noticeable difference between mine and his.

    I do not think it will beat you up, just make you ride smoother.
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    Not so bad

    I got a YBB a couple years ago. Prior rides included 5 Spot, El Salt, Truth. When I go to Moab, I leave the YBB behind and rent a 6-7" travel bike. The YBB is fine on slickrock, but you'll have a lot more fun with real travel on Porcupine, Amasa Back, and the like. In the front range of Colorado, the YBB has enough suspension for the trails and is a great climber.

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    Definitely a fantastic bike....I have an Ibis Mojo too, which has a sweet suspension design. The only bad thing about the YBB Moots- the YBB will reveal (as I discovered today) a bad pedal technique with a bit of pogo-ing. Dammit!

    I have another ride on my new Moots tomorrow. I live in Colorado as well and it should be a fantastic bike here though I will continue to have a FS bike for trails here and places like Moab.

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    Oh yeah, I have owned the Spot and the Salt as well.

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    This year I rode my YBB after a couple years of mostly riding either my Nomad or Hecklers (5-6" bikes), and it does beat you up a bit. The amount of compliance isn't so bad, it's the lack of damping that annoys me the most; little kicks in the butt and a bit of pogoing...but it's still a great bike, I just choose appropriate times/places to ride it.
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    I realize that I am a bit late to this thread but I just got a YBB 2 weeks ago after 1 1/2 years on a Titus Motolite 5" travel. For my general riding, the increase in speed and quickness of handling out weigh the compromise in plushness. Having said that, I rode a hardtail for 10 years before going FS so the YBB suits my style a bit better.

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    I find myself adjusting my style because the bike responds so much better that way. The YBB take the edge off but so do the 29er wheels. The bike is pretty responsive and quick. I just raised the fork to 100mm (from 80) so that should help with the rockgardens.

    Eventually, I'll consider a long stem and H-Bar but for now, I'm extremely happy with the bike and am glad I went with the YBB option. I may add a HT to the collection eventually- Ti or Steel. With 29ers, Hardtails are easy to dig.

    MichaelW- Is your Rigor considerably firmer than your buddy's YBB?

  10. #10
    egi
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    Hello,
    About the ybb: Can you use the full travel(25 mm)?
    Is there SAG?

    Thanks.

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    I'm 185 and on a large with the stiff spring so I use maybe 60%-70% of the travel. If I were on a medium, I'd probably use all the travel possible.

    Yes, there is sag but understand that it is simply a spring with no damping so does not behave like a modern shock does. It behaves like a spring does. You can lock it out almost all the way and negate its movement almost completely. I leave it unlocked to take a bit of sharpness out of trail chatter and big hits.
    Last edited by Flyer; 11-02-2008 at 07:02 AM.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyer
    I find myself adjusting my style because the bike responds so much better that way. The YBB take the edge off but so do the 29er wheels. The bike is pretty responsive and quick. I just raised the fork to 100mm (from 80) so that should help with the rockgardens.

    Eventually, I'll consider a long stem and H-Bar but for now, I'm extremely happy with the bike and am glad I went with the YBB option. I may add a HT to the collection eventually- Ti or Steel. With 29ers, Hardtails are easy to dig.

    MichaelW- Is your Rigor considerably firmer than your buddy's YBB?
    I did not notice it being firmer. It could be that he adn I run different tire pressures. I run 33psi F&R, and I have a Moots post. He runs almost 40psi, and has a Thomson Elite post. I do how ever weight about 7 pounds less.

    So, short answer is no.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelW
    I did not notice it being firmer. It could be that he adn I run different tire pressures. I run 33psi F&R, and I have a Moots post. He runs almost 40psi, and has a Thomson Elite post. I do how ever weight about 7 pounds less.

    So, short answer is no.

    So what is the difference in how they ride? Man, that is some killer psi- at 40, I feel like I'm pinballing off everything. I'm 185 and run between 29-33 depending on tire and trail

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyer
    So what is the difference in how they ride? Man, that is some killer psi- at 40, I feel like I'm pinballing off everything. I'm 185 and run between 29-33 depending on tire and trail
    The ride is smoother on the YBB, but with the Moots post I felt the ride difference between his and mine was quite minimal.

    40 psi is alot, I told him if he lowered his psi it might hadle better, but he is scared he will pinch(yes he still runs tubes).
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    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelW
    The ride is smoother on the YBB, but with the Moots post I felt the ride difference between his and mine was quite minimal.

    40 psi is alot, I told him if he lowered his psi it might hadle better, but he is scared he will pinch(yes he still runs tubes).
    I remember when I ran tubes- been a while but I used to run between 40 and 45. Odd how I forgot about that. It is interesting to know that the Moots Ti seatpost makes such a difference. I may have to spring for that one of these days.

  16. #16
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    Anyone running a 100mm fork on a 26" YBB?

    I'm pretty sure my 1997 YBB was designed around an 80mm fork. I converted it to a ss but I'm finding going from the full squish back to the steep HA and 80mm travel more bothersome than I thought I would. The ride difference and handling takes some getting used to, esp in corners and dropping steep trails so I thought going 100mm might bridge the gap a little but it might make for floppy climbing.

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    I think '97s were designed around a 60mm fork. An 80mm fork works fine but a 100mm will chopper that baby out. I did it for a while on a '99 Merlin which had approx the same geometry as your ybb and up steep hills it was fairly floppy, on the flat it's like a beach cruiser and on the steep downs it's actually nicer. Look at it this way - if you do put on a 100mm you'll enjoy the same magical ride qualities that Jeff Jones riders have (add a layback post for extra silliness)

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