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  1. #1
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    Schwinn SweetSpot Parts

    So after several years of serving me well I gave up on this bike since I was no longer able to find replacement Bushings. It gave me a excuse to by my Ellsworth though which I love.

    Every once in awhile I see the frame sitting in my garage and I think about building it back out, got plenty of extra parts laying around to do it.

    In another thread I found someone mentioned that they were able to find bushings at
    http://www.mcmaster.com/

    Well Looks like they are a pretty standard size but there are so many materials to choose from Nylon, Delrin, Rulan, PTFE, and various incarnations of those also. Any one go this route yet? and what type of material worked well for you? Also specific part numbers you may have ordered from this or another manufacture would be greatly appreciated.


    Looks like there is a ready source of derailleur hangers to be had
    http://www.derailleurhanger.com/schwinn.htm

  2. #2
    smell my finger
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    HI! I have ordered bushings from McMaster-Carr. I saved the part # it is 57785k39. This number is about 4 years old, I haven't ordered anymore since I ordered 2 full sets. I chose to get the UHMW bushings. Ultra High Mulecular Weight polyurethane bushings they are white. If I rember correctly the shaft size is 1.5", the outside diameter is 1.75" and the thicness is .125" (1/8th) I had to shorten the insert depth of the bushing but that was no big deal. These bushings are tight, smooth and seemed to wear long It really took the slop out of the rear end. You'll be able to ride that bike forever with a supply of bushings.

    I'm currently riding my sweetspot and it handles some decent sized (4'-5') drops and jumps and speedy rocky downhill runs. A strong frame.

  3. #3
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    Thanks Mang!

    I went ahead an ordered a set made out of Delrin this weekend, part number Part Number: 2705T46, if these do not hold out long I'll give the UHMW's a try. It will be nice to bring this bike back to life, had a lot of good times on it.

  4. #4
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    I have been looking for these bushings for a while. Did these work well for you? I am specifically curious how they fit. I will probalby order the MDS Filled Nylon and give those a try. I found a new set from a LBS but the bushings are blue and for the carbon frames so they wont fit (both schwinn, LBS and a some other guy I met confirmed this). I am an engineer and work with these matarials a lot... From the looks of these blue ones they are nylon.

    I have all the tools to measure the bores and such but if you guys can give me confidence in the fit I will go ahead and order them and not waste any time

    Im in love with my S-20, bought it new in 98

  5. #5
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    HI, yeah my pivot tube is 1.5" outside diameter. The bushing is 1.75" outside diameter to fit into the hole in the frame. The bushing material thickness is .125". The overall width is 2", the flange is .25" around the circumference of the bushing.

    My original bushings are blue nylon also. There is a diffferent size though, I once tried to buy bushings on e-bay, only to find that they were thinner material thickness (I couldn't use them).

  6. #6
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    The one's I tried Delrin , part number Part Number: 2705T46 I was not satisfied with, even though the measurments seemed right, they just did not fit as snug as the Blue OEM ones's.

  7. #7
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    I have a brand new set of BLUE bushings I bought from my LBS and they have one more set with pin. I have the right tools to measure them properly and will do so tonight, along with some digital pics I will post.

    What I need to find out is if they will fit my aluminum ' 98 S-20. The stock bushings on my bike are creme in color. I tried to take my bike apart over the weekend to measure my stock creme color ones but my bike is still tight and I did not want to damage them. Seems like they are still in great shape... for now anyways, but I ride a lot harder these days.

    Any info anyone can provide is helpfull. I have the resources to have some made if I find enough people to place an order and get the price down. Stay tuned as I am determined to make sure my bike last for many more years

  8. #8
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    Ok, here are photos of brand new blue bushings suposedly for the carbon frame homegrown bikes. They measure as such:

    Blue Bushing Measurements
    ID = 1.510
    OD = 1.662
    OAL = 0.630
    Flange Thick = 0.082
    Flange OD = 1.997
    Pin OD = 1.501
    Pin ID = 1.373

    Blue Bushings (Suposedly for Homegrown Carbon Fiber frames)



    My Bushings



    My Bike



    Now, if someone has the creme color ones like on my bike I would be curious what they measure. I would take mine apart but I dont want to mess mine up as they still have a bit of life left in them.

    So, I have two options. I either find bushings for my bike and sell the two blue pair I have (which one is already taken). Or, I find myself a homegrown frame to buy. So if anyone has one laying around I'm a potential buyer.
    Last edited by RoosterFXP; 10-09-2006 at 08:37 PM.

  9. #9
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    Looks like the same frame as mine, only mine was the largest size they made. My bike was originally a 97, at some point (maybe 2000/2001) I broke the front triangle, followed by the rear triangle about 6 month's later, the part's were interchangeable. I think the rear Triangle being like a 1999 it had been upgraded with disk brake mounts.

    I seem to remember at some point they changed the bushings a bit to wear longer. My measurement done imprecisely with a ruler were like what Joemamad stated above.



  10. #10
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    The UHMW bushings I ordered fit tight. My rear had some slop in it from worn bushings, these tightened it up. At first the pivot tube felt a little loose with the bushings out of the frame, but once installed they were tight.

  11. #11
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    Hmm well we seem to have proved there are two different sizes.

    This is getting confusing... im tired from thinking at work all day so i will try to sum it all up soon. I would know for sure if i took my bike apart but im not willing to do that yet...

    How hard is it to get this sweet spot apart?

  12. #12
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    I didn't find it that difficult. Just loosened the pinch bolts and very carefully used a wooden dowl on the pivot tube and tapped the tube out one side. I spread the pinch area very carefully, and only very slightly with a screwdriver to relieve any pinch force on the tube. Once it is out a little ways, it becomes easier to pulll out. I removed the shock before surgery. When reassembling, do not use any petroleum-based lubes (grease, WD-40, 3-in-1 oil, etc...), I used Rock Shox Judy butter it's made especially for plastics like urathane shock elatomers (remember those?).

    I have taked the pivot apart a few times and lubed it because the cleaner you keep the bushings, the longer they will last and the quieter they'll be.

  13. #13
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    OK did a bit more playing around today, took it apart and reassembled everything using some wood blocks and a clamp to press the sides in tight against the bushings. Everything is great no play, etc.

    Went out for a lunch ride about 20 miles, get home and I've got play again.

    Looks like the Blue OEM bushings I have, have a flange thickness a hair over a 1/8 inch, so the pivot arms have to press in more than normal for a tight contact with the 1/8 inch bushings i'm trying. But the arms naturally want to work there way back to there normal position, even though I've torxed the screws down hard.

    Appears to my eye that the flange thickness on my OEM bushings is 4 mm. I can place them next to the 1/8 inch McMaster-Carr see that there abit thicker.
    Last edited by TahoeBC; 10-11-2006 at 06:46 PM.

  14. #14
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    Just to add how I have always serviced mine. Pretty quick and easy.

    Loosen pinch bolts

    Lightly tap out tube with a hammer and tap. Made by grinding and old Phillips head screw driver down to a flat end.

    I just tap it all the way out, no removing of the shock.

    remove bushing, clean up if nessary. I never lubed them in any way. When they start to fit loose in the frame, I wrap them with a couple loops of teflon pipe tape to snug them up.

    insert bushings back in

    line up rear trangle holes and tap cylinder back in.

    with two blocks of wood and a vise I press everything tight

    Tighten pinch bolts

    Seems like at least you could place the blue bushings next to your installed ones and compare the flange thickness for starters.
    Last edited by TahoeBC; 10-11-2006 at 06:50 PM.

  15. #15
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    Guys,

    Things are just not adding up. I have taken notes on all these comments and im scratching my head. TahoeBC if your bushings are definately not less than 1/8 thick on the flange, these new bushings I have are not going to work for you. They are definately less than 1/8. The measurements I made were tken with nice calipers and are accurate to .001 inches with exception to the bushing ID which is probable a couple thousanths larger, this is due to flat spots on the tips. I dont have a proper bore guage but its close enough.

    What I find weird is I gather your OEM flange thickness is larger than 1/8 and you say with the McMaster bushings you have play on the pin. But that would mean that there are two different rear triangles... yours being wider. This it what really throws a wrench in my thinking. Maybe they made the switch in 99 when the rear disc was added. Who knows.

    I may be able to get my hands on a friend of a friends frame for inspection here in a week or so. I will most likely take mine bike apart and see if my new blue bushings are the same as my OEM creme ones. If they are the same im golden, but i will still try to help you guys out. Anyone who has a passion for this frame is a friend of mine. If they are different, im still screwed but at least I will be able to do a comparison and help us all out.

    I will stay tuned with this thread until we solve this. I can get anything made, will probably not be too cheap but the more ordered the price will go down. I would guss for the bushigs alone would be about $40-$60 a pair plus material. Thats about half what I paid for these blue ones!

    My brain hurts, Im off to bed whew.

    Oh btw, if those mcmaster ones fit but you have end play ( a gap in ther ) just need to have some shims made... could be a solution for you. May even be able to get them from McMaster.

  16. #16
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    Yep they are definitely slightly larger than an 1/8 inch, I did think about the shim thing last night also.

    Luckily for me this is not my primary bike, but it sure is fun to take out once in awhile even if I have to retighten the pivot after every ride, since it will only be a few times a year.

    Amazing how well this 10 year old suspension technology has held up over the years. The Bushings have always been the weak link though. The newer ones they came out with lasted much longer than the original one's though.

    I do not believe that I switched my bushings with the new rear triangle though, since I got new ones with my warranted front triangle, 6 month's before. BTW keep an eye on the frame in the pivot area, thats were mine cracked, basically the bike broke in half landing a jump, it was not pretty. The whole pivot area was trashed so I got a new cyclinder and bushings along with the frame.

    One possiblity is mine was the "Homegrown" version made by yeti in Durango.

  17. #17
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    Dumb question, cause I know these bikes well (the aluminim ones) but I must ask...

    You homegrown is carbon fiber right? I just have not been around many carbon bikes so Im wanting to clarify how they are built. If you look at a photo of one you still see welds, so what is really carbon? Do they just use like aluminum connectors and the tubes are carbon molded around the connectors? This may help me, cause I was originally thinking that the pivot housing on a homegrown would be carbon.

    If our pivot housings are made from different materials that would be an important thing to know. I would assume the carbon would need to be thicker in this area they may had to re-engineer the whole thing. This will help me figure out whats going on I think.

    Thanks

  18. #18
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    Mine is aluminim, I think the carbon fiber ones had a whole different look to them.

    See this link
    http://www.mtbr.com/reviews/Bike_ful...ct_19210.shtml

    Ours was this one, but the picture is not correct
    http://www.mtbr.com/reviews/Bike_ful...ct_19208.shtml

    Updated for correct link
    Last edited by TahoeBC; 10-12-2006 at 09:34 AM.

  19. #19
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    Last edited by TahoeBC; 10-12-2006 at 10:28 AM.

  20. #20
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    Wow - that was a ride in the way back machine....lol I forgot I had that old page - I was determined to save every last SweetSpot then. Since - I've sold that bike and I'll go look in the garage for the parts box I had - if memory serves me right I had an extra set of bushings and couple pivot tubes (even one made of Ti - oooh wow....lol). Hopefully the dimension - or print I had is in there - since I was going to get bushings made... I'll check it out when I get home later....

    FF


    Quote Originally Posted by TahoeBC
    "If I'm leading, I'm bleeding."

  21. #21
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    Back to my dumb question... I was always under the assumption that ALL homegrowns were Carbon Fiber. I know that other weird '99 design was carbon but I thought yours was too TahoeBC.

    So that eliminates some drama. Right now my bust guess is that they infact DID make a design change in the bushings. We both have aluminum frames yet we are getting different measurements.

    Based on the flange thickness alone I think these new bushings I have might fit my bike but not yours. Why? Could be cause my bike is a foreign made and yours (homegrown) is made in usa. Metric vs English? Could be. But you bought english bushings from McMaster and still had slop, but jomamad said they worked for him. So that means a design change?

    jomamad... is your bike a homegrown or s-series? That will help.

  22. #22
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    I never saw a carbon fiber one, and dibs on those Bushings Fast Freddy

  23. #23
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    TahoeBC... the pics on Freddys page of the tube and bearings... I can alost tell by looking at that photo that the flange on those have to be 1/8 or larger... which they will work for you! If I hold mine at that angle they appear thinner.

    I wanted to ask this also if anyone knows for sure: With this frame, what is the difference between the Homegrown and an S-Series? Is it only where they are made? One is not any lighter than the other? They should be dinensionally the same otherwise.

    Freddy... if you can find that drawing we can compare it to the dimensions I took of these new ones I found. That would be auesome!

    Botton line is I need to take my bike apart... but I want to wait till its too cold to ride. My pin is very tight, as others confirm in that first link. It will be difficult for me cause i already beat on it a little bit and it didnt budge at all. That was even with another person helping me by spreading both clamps with screwdrivers.

  24. #24
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    The pictures on his website look just like mine.


    Here is a pic of my bike I grabed from the Schwinn website soon after I bought the bike, looked exactly like this.

  25. #25
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    If I have the bushings I'm thinking of they were thinner. I rememeber when I called Pacific for the parts they had 2 listed so I bought both figuring one of the 2 would work for me. And yes the flanges were different thickness and the outside diameter of the press in busing was slightly different also I think.... but the flange thickness was defintely different. I want to say my was a 98 model. The fullsuspensions like this started in 1996 - but sis not have the oversized pivot. The 97 was the first year for the aluminum sweetspot as we know it. I believe the 99 models added the carbon front triangles.... but the aluminums were still available. The S series and the Homegrowns were the same essential bike except for minor tubing, disc brake tabs, etc.... varied year to year. I actually bought a 99 S30 carbon swapped rear triangles just so I could get disc brakes. The pivot point was exactly the same on each bike. The rear triangle from the S series - the S series was 6 ounce heavier... had disc brake mounts (Hayes specific chainstay mount)... and on the rear droupouts (I know for sure on the drive side) the Homegrowns have tomatos on there and the S series have a Schwinn "S" on them. But other than minor changes (the S series being the beefier of the 2) the S series and the Homegrown series are the same beast.

    Where was I going with this..... I'm forgetting....lol

    Oh yeah - the bushings I beileve are 2 types... the pivot tubes all the same. Not sure on which models - or what year the bushing change was made - never had enough people around to get a concensus...

    Hope this helps some...
    FF
    "If I'm leading, I'm bleeding."

  26. #26
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    I just saved that pic (of Freddys bushings) to my hardrive, you can open it much bigger. I just noticed by doing that I now see the grooves cut into them. I am almost cetain Freddy and you have the same size bushings. The new blue ones I found have NO grooves in them.

    Me on the otherhand, have thinner wall on both my OEM bushings and these new blue ones I bought. The color is different though.

    Im getting more confident that the ones I bought will work for me. I so much hope this is so. Cause I would have 2 new sets then. Im thinking my only unknow is the bushing OD that fits in the frame and I need to disassemble to check that...

  27. #27
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    Thanks for the history lesson Fast Freddy!

    My rear droupouts have tomatos on them.

    RosterFXP, if you decide to ride that bike for awhile, consider upgrading the shock to a air shock. After my Rock Shock Delux started leaking, I upgraded to a Cane Creek air shock, what a difference that made, also it was much lighter!

    PS, you might want to contact this Ebay seller just to ask about his bushings, if nothing else, color, etc.
    http://cgi.ebay.com/SCHWINN-S-30-26-...QQcmdZViewItem
    Last edited by TahoeBC; 10-12-2006 at 12:33 PM.

  28. #28
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    I just put a 2005 Marzocchi MX Pro ETA front fork on her, damn fine porn star she is now. The rear I recently swapped for a Coupe Deluxe (same but with rebound) I found it on ebay for $24. I like it much better.

    My Deluxe shock never leaked authough it did start sounding like it had a little air in it. I ran a 550 pound spring on it cause I was a tiny squirt back then. But putting on the 120mm front fork it put just a tad bit more weight on the rear (decreased head angle), plus I weigh more now. BUT the new Coupe Deluxe came with an 800 pound spring and it solved that problem.

    I am interested in knowing what rear shocks I have to choose from. I would want something nice but have no experience with air, other than my new front fork that has air on one side.

    BTW I love this front fork... if I can get the rear to behave the same I will go nuts. Love all this conversation about this fine piece of history. If I had to buy a new bike now, I wouldnt have a clue what to get.

  29. #29
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    I had my LBS back when it was still around order mine, I think an AD-10, rebuilt it once with a $10 rebuild kit from Cane creek. Even after like 4 years of sitting around it still holds air like a champ! It was pretty amazing to hold both shocks, the coil over one weighed like twice as much!

    http://archive.mtbr.com/12/0EE93FF3.php
    Last edited by TahoeBC; 10-12-2006 at 01:00 PM.

  30. #30
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    That S-30 on Ebay, already mailed the guy hes a powerseller basically knows nothing. Told him that bike is worthless and once the bearings go out your screwed lol. I offered him $200 for it tho, his price is too high.

    I found an AD-10 on Ebay but it needs rebuilt. What kind of controls does it have? Compression and rebound?

    Im gonna send you a PM about something off subject too.

  31. #31
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    I do not recall exactly, there were a couple adjustments that could be made, but I have not changed anything in many years so I forget. The rebuild was pretty easy BTW.

    Here is a link to the manual
    http://www.canecreek.com/fileadmin/c...10%20manual%22

    Just be sure you get the eye to eye length right, they come in different sizes, there might be other considerations also?

    I think the Cloud Nine is a better shock, they had a program going for awhile to upgrade the ad-10 to Cloud nine's for a pretty good discount.

  32. #32
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    Talking rear shock...

    If you notice when you take off the rear shock this pivot allows you to pull up the rear to almost endless rotation. Making it appear that you can put any length rear shock on it. What you think? With a longer front fork decreasing my head angle, lifting the rear would get me back to stock... almost like a lift kit lol... btw, the new fork didnt make much difference in handling, my LBS had me paranoid about sluggish steering but I BARELY notice a difference.

    So if I could go a half inch longer on the rear shock I would consider it... trying to figure out that geometry in my head... and im a machine designer lol, I could whip up a quick 3D model to make sure it would even be doable but I dont have the time. Bushings are #1 priority right now it seems.

    I hope Freddy can hook you up, Im from St. Louis so if you ever drive thru with the bike lets go ride the **** outta these bad boys!

  33. #33
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    I dunno, seems like you'd mess up the geometry to me, but if you can find some cheap used shocks to play with, might be fun to try out!

  34. #34
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    Rooster, if that is you bidding on the black schwinn homegrown front triangle on e-bay, FWY that is aluminum. Carbon fiber is not welded together (welds are clearly visible in pics) and the carbon fiber Schwinn homegrown front monocoque frames look completely different (not tubular), they look like boomerangs. The '99 S-10,S-20, S-30 are the carbon fiber Sweetspots, the S-40 like mine is the "low end" 6061 aluminum framed iteration, it was however made by yeti in Colorado or a company called Annodizing inc. in the U.S.A. as were all of the "Homegrowns". There are '96 S-9 sixes that are aluminum but have drastically different pivots and rear triangles. My Homegrown has tomatoes on the dropouts and the rear chainstay disk mount.

  35. #35
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    Disc Brake Swap?

    Quote Originally Posted by Fast Freddy
    the S series was 6 ounce heavier... had disc brake mounts (Hayes specific chainstay mount)
    First off, let me state that I am enjoying this thread immensely! I recently came into an S-20 that is the twin of the orange one above and love it to the point that my brand new Avalanche 1.0 is going up for sale. The one thing I am loathe to give up is disc brakes (Hayes hydraulic on the 1.0 ruined me forever) so finding Fast Freddy's post was heartening. I would happily do a rear triangle swap if someone could enlighten me as to which years and models would allow addition of rear discs, if any. Thanks in advance for your wisdom, all.

  36. #36
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    jomamad, ya that was me bigging on that but only cause i figued if i had a homegrown and a foreign made one that these pivot bearings i have would have to fit one of them. I was only willing to pay the dollar for it lol, i hope whoever bought it reialized it was an incomplete frame lol

    im just going to have to break down and disassemble by bike to know for sure... maybe this weekend

    i finally have a grasp of the frame materials/years... but cant help the other guy here about what years have disc or not...

    i honeslty love vbrakes myself

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by mophile
    I would happily do a rear triangle swap if someone could enlighten me as to which years and models would allow addition of rear discs, if any.
    I believe the disc brake mounts started in 1999 - as the Hayes specific chain stay mount. I'm not sure if and when they switched over from that point to a 51MM IS mount on the top of the seat stay (like most brakes today).

    I had to buy a 99 S30 Carbon (because thats all I could find at the time) to swap rear ends.

    FF
    "If I'm leading, I'm bleeding."

  38. #38
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    I haven't forgotten about you guys... the box of parts was not where I thought it was... which suprised me... as it was a pretty big box... oh well when it turns up I'll post...

    FF
    "If I'm leading, I'm bleeding."

  39. #39
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    Finally...

    I found some new old stock!

    I bought several pair of them... all he had but its enough to get several bikes back on the trail.

    I will put some up on ebay to try and recoup some cost... first auction #130200618407
    Last edited by RoosterFXP; 02-22-2008 at 05:28 PM.

  40. #40
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    Hi do you have any more of these bushings left?? I am building up a Homegrown sweet spot frame. It will include a Rohloff hub, gravity dropper seatpost, a Monitou Minute IT with remote, and a Cane Creek Cloud nine. Should be a cool ride. Cheers

  41. #41
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    Oh yeah ny Email is:Pscribner@Stoweaccess.com. Thanks

  42. #42
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    Hi, I love my Mazda, thats why I am posting in the Ford owners club forum and asking questions Miata.....

    Sorry Schwinn guy (can I call you GUY?) but this is a GT Forum...

    There is a POS forum exclusive to Schwinn and Mangoose

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by farmerjohn
    Hi, I love my Mazda, thats why I am posting in the Ford owners club forum and asking questions Miata.....

    Sorry Schwinn guy (can I call you GUY?) but this is a GT Forum...

    There is a POS forum exclusive to Schwinn and Mangoose

    Well the Schwinn Forum used to be combined with the GT forum after they they both got bought by Pacfic and became wallmart bikes. When they split the Forums up this old thread did not get moved with it.

    Enjoy your POS GT farmer boy I hear there good for sneaking up on sheep

  44. #44
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    Seeking info on Sweetspot flanges for S-30

    Quote Originally Posted by RoosterFXP
    I found some new old stock!

    I bought several pair of them... all he had but its enough to get several bikes back on the trail.

    I will put some up on ebay to try and recoup some cost... first auction #130200618407
    Hi, My S-30 finally started creaking enough to annoy me into searching for info on replacement parts. I found a 2006 reference to McMaster-Carr part number 57785K39 UHMW Bearing Flange for 1-1/2" Shaft Diameter and 1-3/4" OD. I bought a couple of those and they arrived yesterday. Sadly these parts are way too loose on the bearing tube to be of any use. Would you happen to have any more up to dat info on the true replacement flanges? My originals are a beige color.
    Cheers,
    David.

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    i still have 3 pair of the beige ones... email me at roosterfxp at yahoo. if for some reason you dont hear from me send me a pm here on the board.

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    Spotty Sweet parts

    Yo RoosterDuuuuude,
    Thanks for the followup. I'm in comms now with TahoeBC with a view to trying a blue set he has collecting dust. If TBC's parts come through and fit the bill/frame/bearing tube I'll be sending him the McMaster-Carr items I've already purchased. If those don't fit I'll return his then I'd definitely like to take up your offer for a beige set... especially as my originals are that color. I've no idea about the color esoterics.
    Cheers.
    P.S. Not sure how I would reply to you off this public thread but I'll try what I think you suggested.

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by TeamCodger
    Sadly these parts are way too loose on the bearing tube to be of any use. .
    Sorry if this sounds insulting, but it isn't meant to be. Did you press the bushings into your frame before checking the fit to the pivot tube? I say this because I bought similar bushings in another application, and they were way too loose when "free." However, pressed into their proper location, they tightened up to the correct amount for the application (a shock pivot on another bike). It doesn't seem like this would happen if you just look at the bushings, but it does.

    I have both blue and tan bushings lying in wait for my Sweetspot, and they both are too big for the tube in their free state.

  48. #48
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    Helpful hommies - SweetSpot War and Peace

    Yo CTB... Thanks for the beta ... no insult detected and glad of your input. Very interested to hear that the McM-Carr 57785K39 would endure being pressed into the frame and result in a snug fit on the bearing tube. As you say, just eye-balling it leaves me thinking there's a definite size gap that would not be bridged by squeezing the flanges in. TahoeBC mentioned something I'd noticed about the flange outer rim thickness: his blue set have an obviouse slimmer profile/thickness in comparison with the 57785K39. Mr. Rooster is my best option at the moment I think because the beige colored ones I've removed are at least the same color as one of the sets he has and that's a pretty good start. I'm going to work with him to get them to me for a looksee. I'll bear in mind your findings in the event that the fresh beige set don't fit the bill/frame.
    Cheers.

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    Sweetspot Parts

    Hi Guys!
    I have a Schwinn Homegrown Sweetspot carbon frame (98,99?) and know what you mean about parts sourcing issues. Well, it turns out that John Castellano designed the sweetspot bikes for both Ibis and Schwinn. He has parts for your bikes! Check out the link below and contact him for parts.
    http://www.castellanodesigns.com/index.html
    I asked him awhile back about forks (I got a 100mm Tora, what a difference!) and got great answers. He even sells rear shocks speced and built specifically from Fox.
    Keep the rubber down!

  50. #50
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    Thanks for the tip, Broonsby! I never even thought to see if Castellano had parts. I've wanted to put a nice Fox on the back for a while now, but there aren't any standard ones that match the dimensions and travel. I'm intrigued...

  51. #51
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    I have a set of bushings for Schwinn Homegrown alloy frame. brand new...mint. I ordered a set of bushings for my S20 right before schwinn was bought by Pacific. Unfortunately for me, they sent the wrong ones and they have been collecting dust for about 7 years. I just know there is someone out there with a Homegrown alloy frame that would love to get 4 or 5 more years out of it. lundpaul at tds.net

  52. #52
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    I still have several pair beige for the s-series alloy frames (not homegrown factory frames) and 2 pair blue (for the carbon Y frames). Contact me via PM or email me at yahoo where my email is RoosterFXP at Yahooooooooooooohoooooooo.com... I can take Paypal direct or set up an ebay auction, your choice.

    I have sold several sets to people in this thread... they are legit, original schwinn parts.

  53. #53
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    So is that the determining factor for the bushing types - Carbons got blue, aluminums got beige? What did aluminum Factorys get? I have one set of each, beige and blue, in my stockpile of parts for the future.

  54. #54
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    Factory Homegrowns had the coated aluminum bushings like the ones the guy above has for sale (they are very rare). They have a 4mm flange thickness vs. 2mm

    All swingarms have the same measurement inside to inside and the BB on the Factory Homegrowns are basically 4mm shorter, therefore requiring a thicker flange on each bushing.

  55. #55
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    I don't know if anyone still cares about this thread, but the carbon Homegrown frame's bushings have a 42.25 OD while the aluminum Homegrown frame 'sbushings have a 44.25mm OD.
    Last edited by bad mechanic; 10-21-2009 at 05:28 AM.

  56. #56
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    I ran across another lot of these (the beige ones for S-Series) and picked them up, man were they dusty. They were factory sealed and in new condition. $40 a pair

    PM me here and I will get in touch with you fairly quick. These responses go to my yahoo mail so if you dont hear from me in a few days message me again. Sometimes they get in my spam folder.

  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by broonsby
    Hi Guys!
    I have a Schwinn Homegrown Sweetspot carbon frame (98,99?) and know what you mean about parts sourcing issues. Well, it turns out that John Castellano designed the sweetspot bikes for both Ibis and Schwinn. He has parts for your bikes! Check out the link below and contact him for parts.
    http://www.castellanodesigns.com/index.html
    I asked him awhile back about forks (I got a 100mm Tora, what a difference!) and got great answers. He even sells rear shocks speced and built specifically from Fox.
    Keep the rubber down!

    Hey Broonsby

    Thanks for the info, talked to John today and he is shipping me some bushings, I'll let post again once I see how well they work. He also has pivot tubes and derailleur hangers

    John's Number is 877-PIVOTLESS
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  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by TahoeBC
    Hey Broonsby

    Thanks for the info, talked to John today and he is shipping me some bushings, I'll let post again once I see how well they work. He also has pivot tubes and derailleur hangers

    John's Number is 877-PIVOTLESS
    Yes he does, but he still hasn't gotten back to me if their OD is 42mm or 44mm. Maybe I'll give him a call today.

  59. #59
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    I called and talked to John. He's a very nice guy with a lot of practical knowledge. Anyway, his bushings are 42mm, which would fit all S series Sweetspots, and the Homegrown carbon Sweetspots. He said he's going to look into trying to find some of the 44.5mm (1.75") bushings for Homegrown aluminum users.

    I tried the McMaster UHMW bushing, and while it pressed into the frame beautifully, there was a fair amount of play between it and the pivot tube. It's unfortunate, since it would have been an extremely convenient source.

  60. #60
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    Bad mechanic et al, I'm thinking of upgrading the old rear sid and have done just enough research to have learned that the cane creek cloud nine or ad-10 is a proper fit for my 99 HG Factory Suspension. There could be others, but to know for sure, I need to better understand the dimension standards and what will fit. I see numbers like 7.75x2.25. I think the first is bushing eye to eye and the second could be stroke length or bore radius. Which is it? is there a limitation? I am going to use a 100 mm front fork; is there a handling/wheelbase dynamic I need to pay attention to? Thanks for any input.

    FB.

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    The first number is the length between the centers of the shock's eyes. The second number is the shock's travel. The Sweetspot uses a 5.5x1.25 shock. Now, 5.5" i2i shocks are fairly easy to find, the problem is most of them are 1" travel, so you frame will only get 3" of travel instead of the standard 3.75".

    Cane Creek doesn't currently produce a 5.5x1.25 shock, though you might find some old AD-10 on eBay. If you want a new shock, check out Risse Racing. I talked with them a little earlier this year, and they can set you up with a modern 5.5x1.25 air shock. You can find them at: http://www.risseracing.com/airshocks.shtml

    If you do get rid of the SID, please let me know. I'd probably be interested in it.

    The Factory Suspension frame were design for a 80mm fork, so putting a 100mm fork on there will relax the head angle by about 1 degree. I think it actually makes the ride better since they had a 71.5 degree head angle stock, and with the 100mm fork it takes to 70.5 degree, which mellows the ride out just enough. I've done the exact same thing on my Homegrown hardtail.

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    I called and talked to John. He's a very nice guy with a lot of practical knowledge. Anyway, his bushings are 42mm, which would fit all S series Sweetspots, and the Homegrown carbon Sweetspots. He said he's going to look into trying to find some of the 44.5mm (1.75") bushings for Homegrown aluminum users.

    I tried the McMaster UHMW bushing, and while it pressed into the frame beautifully, there was a fair amount of play between it and the pivot tube. It's unfortunate, since it would have been an extremely convenient source.
    Got a price for John's bushings? How do we order, just call him up and ask? My carbon HG doesn't need any, but it'd be nice to have an extra set, just in case the bike lives long enough to need some.

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by blue72beetle
    Got a price for John's bushings? How do we order, just call him up and ask? My carbon HG doesn't need any, but it'd be nice to have an extra set, just in case the bike lives long enough to need some.
    Yup! Just give him a call. He's a great guy to talk to. His bushings are $30 a set, which is a very reasonable price, especially considering they're made from better material than the stock ones.

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    The Factory Suspension frame were design for a 80mm fork, so putting a 100mm fork on there will relax the head angle by about 1 degree. I think it actually makes the ride better since they had a 71.5 degree head angle stock, and with the 100mm fork it takes to 70.5 degree, which mellows the ride out just enough. I've done the exact same thing on my Homegrown hardtail.
    I totally agree with Bad Mechanic here. I put a 100mm SID on my HG Carbon and was much happier with the geometry than when I had my 80mm SX-R on there. I don't care for over-fast steering, and taking that head angle out with the 100mm fork was just what the doctor ordered. I think the 20mm fork length change is more like -0.5 deg of head angle, but I'd have to dial up my Linkage model to check that. Either way, I liked the change.

    Add me to the list of folks that might be interested in your SID if BMech passes on it.

  65. #65
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    The front fork upgrade is in process now, should be shipping next week. The rear will be next and will likely be a birthday gift to self (Feb). I'll keep you 'post'-ed.
    Thank you for the input. I'm even more excited (if that's possible) for the fork now. 3.5 lbs like my sid, but with modern damping & enough travel for some of the more exciting terrains I can now ride, and a lock out for climbs!

  66. #66
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    I stand corrected. My linkage model of my 17" Homegrown Carbon indicates that it goes from 71.6 head angle with my 80mm '00 SX-R fork to 69.9 head angle with the 100mm SID.

    EDIT: My bad. These attached pictures are with a 6.0" rear shock on the bike (I noticed the BB height was WAY high). With a 5.5", my model goes from 69.6 to 68.0. The model's not dead accurate, but it is consistent in a 1.5ish delta between the forks. The SX-R has an axle-to-crown of 17.5", and the SID is 18.75". My bike is a 17".
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Schwinn SweetSpot Parts-sid.jpg  

    Schwinn SweetSpot Parts-sx-r.jpg  

    Last edited by CTB; 10-30-2009 at 02:51 PM.

  67. #67
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    According to the Schwinn catalog, the Homegrown carbon came stock with a 100mm fork, specifically the Judy XL, which had an axle to crown measurement of roughly 473mm +/- 2mm (~18.62"). With the Judy XL, it was listed as having a 71 degree head angle. Is it possible your measurements are off? I also know first hand the the catalog might simply be wrong.




  68. #68
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    A couple things. 1) My HG Carbon was built up (by me) as a frame kit from all my Moab 2 takeoff parts, other than the fork. 2) My Linkage model was made using the "photograph" method, as opposed to measurements. I wouldn't put stock in the absolute values, but the deltas should be solid. 3) It looks to me like the HG's had both 80mm (non All Mountain) and 100m (All Mountain) per the spec sheets above, but I've been drinking.

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by CTB
    3) It looks to me like the HG's had both 80mm (non All Mountain) and 100m (All Mountain) per the spec sheets above, but I've been drinking.
    Yup, the Homegrown Factory suspension models all came with 80mm forks and had 71.5 degree head angles, while the All Mountain models (also known as the Homegrown Carbon models) had the100mm forks and 71 degree head angles.

  70. #70
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    Is the HG carbon triangle is different than the S-series carbon triangle for geometry? The S-series carbons came with 80mm forks in '99 but still had the 71 head angle. I wonder if they really had two different geometries, or if Schwinn just fudged the numbers in the tables. Hmmm... My HG is not assembled at the moment, but I should try and measure it in reality sometime.

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by CTB
    Is the HG carbon triangle is different than the S-series carbon triangle for geometry? The S-series carbons came with 80mm forks in '99 but still had the 71 head angle. I wonder if they really had two different geometries, or if Schwinn just fudged the numbers in the tables. Hmmm... My HG is not assembled at the moment, but I should try and measure it in reality sometime.
    Yeah, it wouldn't surprise me at all if Schwinn was just creative with the numbers. I'd be very interested to hear what you find if you measure your carbon.

    A thing to remember is a 20mm jump in travel only increases the head tube angle by about 14mm to 15mm due to the increased sag of the extra travel.

  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    A thing to remember is a 20mm jump in travel only increases the head tube angle by about 14mm to 15mm due to the increased sag of the extra travel.
    True for "rider on" measurements, but geometry charts are always printed at zero sag, as I understand it. But you bring a good point, and Linkage can (I think) show numbers with sag added, but I haven't truly taken the time to understand it completely. It requires you to know the weight distribution of the bike, and I can only roughly do that by myself and with one bathroom scale. Also, a 20mm increase in fork travel doesn't necessarily mean a 20mm increase in axle-to-crown, esp when comparing different brands to each other.

    Man, I apologize for seriously derailing this thread...

  73. #73
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    Today I had the pleasure of meeting and riding with John Castellano today. Not only is he really knowledgeable but a super nice guy. Pretty cool to ride the trail where he conceived the sweet spot suspension design!

    Dropped off my Schwinn sweetspot frame so he could measure it up properly to start making up new bushings for everybody looking for them.

    Also got to check out a new sweetspot frame he is making now that has amazing flexibility. By simply moving the rear shock position in the rear you can run either 29 or 26 inch tires. Also you can run it as a single speed or any number of speeds you like. John had his set up with a 26 in the rear and a 29er up front as a singlespeed. It was amazing to see how nimbly he moved on this bike through rocky terrain single speeding it with 6 inch's of travel! launching and tail whipping off every rock he could find.

    Here are couple pics I took today of his bike, before and after our ride, in the first one you can see my old frame in the bike stand behind his new sweetspot.

    Edit to add link I found for this bike on his website
    http://www.castellanodesigns.com/Zorro.html
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Schwinn SweetSpot Parts-img_3100.jpg  

    Schwinn SweetSpot Parts-img_3103.jpg  

    Last edited by TahoeBC; 01-10-2010 at 10:09 AM.
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  74. #74
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    TahoeBC, did you take him a Homegrown Sweetspot? If you did, that means I don't need to send my front triangle to him.

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    TahoeBC, did you take him a Homegrown Sweetspot? If you did, that means I don't need to send my front triangle to him.

    Yes, see the bike pictured in post #9 of this thread, this is the bike I left with him. You might check with John, he might want to check a couple of frames cause they could measure slightly different due to wear.

    And thanks for the heads up that the bushings he had were for a different model, I was able to call him and cancel the order before I got shipped another pair of bushing that would have be useless.
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  76. #76
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    Rear Disk Brakes

    Has anyone successfully used one of the adapters out there to convert the Hayes 22m to 51m IS?

    Here is one link, there are probably more out there
    http://www.torontocycles.com/Selling/Adapters.html
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  77. #77
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    im looking at getting a homegrown sweetspot frame, has the bushings but not the 'shaft' they go on, any ideas where i might get one?

    thanks!
    Quote Originally Posted by HamfisT
    I understand that engineering has value in and of itself. But in the end, it's still just a pile of aluminum tubes.

  78. #78
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    Just contact John Castellano, he's not only the grandfather of the design, and has the parts you need. http://www.castellanodesigns.com

  79. #79
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    Good idea, I hadn't thought of that. They float by on Ebay occasionally, but I haven't seen any for a while.

  80. #80
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    thanks! as soon as i get the frame ill take some measurements and give him a call!
    Quote Originally Posted by HamfisT
    I understand that engineering has value in and of itself. But in the end, it's still just a pile of aluminum tubes.

  81. #81
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    All the hollow pivot point pivot tubes should be the same, with the difference coming in the bushings. If all you need is the pivot tube, you shouldn't even need to take measurements.

    John is an excellent guy to work with, and can get you just about any part for your Sweetspot. You'll also find he still has a passion for them, and loves to help keep them running.

  82. #82
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    thats good to know, i do have the bushings by not the tube.

    thanks!
    Quote Originally Posted by HamfisT
    I understand that engineering has value in and of itself. But in the end, it's still just a pile of aluminum tubes.

  83. #83
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    Got my Frame back from John and WOW is all I have to say. The pivot has no play at all and is super smooth, it's better than when it was new.

    He actually did quite a bit of work, the pivot area on the frame was out of round, he reamed it to fix the out-of-round condition. Then he made aluminum inserts to very tight specs--plus or minus a half thousandth, then pressed in the "Taiwan" sized Igus bushings.

    He also discovered the frame was 1/4 degree out of alignment and fixed that.

    I'll post some pics's when I get a chance, gotta get a couple parts to get this bike rolling again before I can do a test ride, but I know it's gonna be sweet

    This certainly was not worth his time money wise, and has to be his passion at work.

    Thanks John!!!
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  84. #84
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    I'm trying to push a friend of mine over the edge on getting a Zorro, and he's shared with me the info, etc, that he's gotten from John. John certainly supports his bikes well. I wouldn't hesitate to buy from John.

  85. #85
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    Built the bike back out with a hodgepodge of parts I had laying around and took it for it's maiden voyage last Thursday. Rides really sweet thanks Johnn for bringing an old friend back to life
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Schwinn SweetSpot Parts-sweetspot1.jpg  

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    TahoeBC - that's fantastic that you met and got to work with JC on restoring your HG frame. Is this something that JC is up for more of - restoration work?

    I just pulled out my 1997 Factory full suspension for a 6 hour race and it was great. Pivot is at the end of its life so planning to do an overhaul (I've been collecting parts knowing this project was coming up).

    I will say this: anyone who has one of these frames needs to put an new shock on the back and front if you have not already. I now have a Cane Creek Cloud 9 in the back and a RockShox Reba Team on the front and it is a totally different (and bettter) bike. Feels like a brand new bike, really.

    Cheers.

  87. #87
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    Quote Originally Posted by smailsteve
    TahoeBC - that's fantastic that you met and got to work with JC on restoring your HG frame. Is this something that JC is up for more of - restoration work?
    I believe so, call him John's Number is 877-PIVOTLESS, or e-mail him MrPivotless@castellanodesigns.com

    Super nice guy and has a passion for these old bikes
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    Smailsteve: I'm looking at the Cloud 9 for my '97 FS HG. My AD-12 is shot so I'll do the Cane Creek trade-in. Where there any specific or unique measurements for your installment? Did you deal with Cane Creek directly?
    Thanks.

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    I cannot believe how resourceful you guys are. I mentioned back in July 2009 that John Castellano still supports these bikes with bushings/bearings and you took off with it.

    I am so psyched that these bikes are still around. I get *lots* of comments about it. I am constantly amazed at how many people stop me and ask about it because they have an old one in the garage due to bad bushings/bearings. They perk up quickly when I mention that they can still get parts!

  90. #90
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    Hey TahoeBC, have you tried that adapter plate for the rear disc brake? It looks like it should work as the rear triangle is pretty tight and the plate should simply move the modern caliper into the correct position.

    Hope someone here has tried it because it would be great to stop running a mullet (Avid BB7 disc front, V brake rear)! That V brake in the back simply causes the rear triangle to flex too much so there's not too much stopping power.

    Thanks for any feedback.

    Keep the rubber side down or you'll be wearing a frown!

  91. #91
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    Hey broonsby

    I have not tried the adapter yet, I'm waiting for you to tell me how it works out
    Go get that KOM "You Deserve" - http://www.digitalepo.com/index.php

  92. #92
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    Been a while since I visited this thread but I'm still subscribed. I sold my 99 Factory suspension last Spring (2010) and started riding a 6" giant Reign. Great bike, but not the efficient climber the sweetspot is. This winter I spotted an S-10 carbon with ALL original parts, even a factory tioga rear tire, on CL and picked it up as a spare. After a couple of training rides I've decided to build it up and use it for racing/epics and xtended climb rides. I bought another Risse Genesis for the rear since i was so happy with it before, a Monkeylite XC Carbon bar, 2010 Reba SL 100mm fork, and I have a set of 2009 Crossmax SL's. I'll post pics as the parts come in and get loaded to the bike. I was going to have a local fram builder weld a disc brake tab on the rear triangle, since the s-10's were made from 7005 I'm told they don't need to be heat treated after welding. However, even with that I was quoted more for that than I paid for the bike ($175 vs $150). I'm planning at this point to use the adapter sold by toronto cycles. It looks to be stiff enough and gets the caliper up and out of the frame joint. I have new BB7's waiting as well. Target: about 24.5 lbs.

    Oh, & the ODI lock-on grips with Red clamps looks positively SICK against the red/black frame!

    I'll be back with photos and a comment on the toronto cycles adapter in about 10-15 days.
    2009 Specialized Stumpy Expert. Bike with brains.
    1997 Homegrown Factory 23-24lbs & afraid to ride it. I'm 200.

  93. #93
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    You know, the Sweetspots make really great single speeds...

  94. #94
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    Ooooh, don't tempt. I have not tried the SS thing, I do a lot of climbing at my favorite trail network. I may look into 1x9 though, with a bike under 25 I think I could push a 26 or even 28 tooth cog but I'd want an 11-36 cassette.
    2009 Specialized Stumpy Expert. Bike with brains.
    1997 Homegrown Factory 23-24lbs & afraid to ride it. I'm 200.

  95. #95
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    I just got John Castellano's bushings and installed them. Tough to get it right because they seem like they are actually flared, but a great, tight fit when in. Hey, can soemone save me a little time? I have a raceface Deus XC crankset with external BB. Will that work on the older BB shell? I'd like to use this modern crankset, but if the Schwinn won't take it, I'll leave the old square taper LX. Thanks.
    2009 Specialized Stumpy Expert. Bike with brains.
    1997 Homegrown Factory 23-24lbs & afraid to ride it. I'm 200.

  96. #96
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    The external bottom brackets work just fine, though I'd strongly recommend facing the bottom bracket shell. I've found every single one I've done needed facing, I suspect because of how it's welded into the rear triangle.

    Pick up the DMR STS kit from Jenson USA for $40 and give single speed a try. You definitely owe it to yourself to do it at least once.

  97. #97
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    Set my old sweetspot up with the cross tires and did a 80 mile, nearly 13K of vert ride on Saturday, fun to get out on the ole bike again. Think I have a reason to ride this bike more now as single speeding never really appealed to me and I can't ride a hardtail any more due to lower back issues, so set up as a cross bike is perfect for getting this bike back into ride rotations again.





    Coe Montercross light by tahoebc at Garmin Connect - Details

  98. #98
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    Reviving an old thread for clarification on the bushing size for aluminum Factory Homegrowns. Is it the same as the McMaster bushing mentioned early in this thread but with a 4mm thick flange? Does Castellanodesigns still sell them? I sent him an email this morning, but I can't wait until Monday to find out. Thanks in advance!

  99. #99
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    John does still sell them. I took him my frame a month or so back and he took care of me. Great guy!
    The bicycle is a curious vehicle. Its passenger is its engine. ~ John Howard

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