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  1. #1
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    Mongoose Xr-comp

    Hey buds, i have a mongoose xr-comp with not many mods on wanted to know how many of you have seen this bike or own it and anyother mogoose out there that are comps. Just want to chat it up and get feed back on the brand since im new to the mtb world. Thanks in advance....
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  2. #2
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    Well, I personally have never ridden one, but my uncle has the same thing. He rides it 30 miles a day, 3 days a week. He use to compete in xc and others (not sure what all he did). He rode a motobecane road bike back in the day. He loves the xr comp. The only complaints he has about it so far are the head tube bearings being pitted. He's had it for a couple months and that's the only thing he's replaced. He rides our trails up at lake fayetteville in NW AR

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by bones72751
    Well, I personally have never ridden one, but my uncle has the same thing. He rides it 30 miles a day, 3 days a week. He use to compete in xc and others (not sure what all he did). He rode a motobecane road bike back in the day. He loves the xr comp. The only complaints he has about it so far are the head tube bearings being pitted. He's had it for a couple months and that's the only thing he's replaced. He rides our trails up at lake fayetteville in NW AR


    If your bike comes with one of these on it, you probably shouldnt do much trail riding on it

  4. #4
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    I just bought this bike last week. I got it used but in new condition for $200. I've gotten varied opinions on it but the best one I got was from my local bike shop tech. He said it was a great starter bike for me to see if the hobby was for me. I plan to take it on a few trails either this fall or maybe early next spring and if all goes well I will be upgrading next summer to something a little bit better. It is a solid bike with full suspension, and while its not the best you might as well get some use out of it and if you decide you want better then that is up to you. Who know it might turn out to be all the bike you need especially if you don't do much harsh riding. My first suggestion would be to remove some of the decals. I removed the yellow rim stickers, the "m" finish line, and the disc brake stickers so far. Oh and wd40 and a shop towel works great at removing the sticky crap left over from the decals.

  5. #5
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    I fully agree that their is a place for cheaper beginner bikes for riders to start on. I started on 200 dollar bikes and worked my way up as my skill level got better. There is no place for cheap full suspension begginer bikes though. The mongoose xr series bikes start out at 43lbs, a full 11 lbs heavier then the heaviest full suspension mongoose bike that is sold at a bike ship. The suspension itself has no damping. Not a huge deal on a fork, but on a bike with a rear shock, its dangerous.

  6. #6
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    yes, but shocks are replaceable. From my and others i've talked to's experience, as long as you start off with a decent walgoose (which is what i'd consider the xr-comp) you can buy it for $300-400, ride it to start with, and upgrade as you go. I mean, you could put another 3-400 into it, and you'd have a decent equal to a bike shop bike, for probably around the same price. The frame on the comp is pretty damn good, not very heavy (for the price anyway), and nicely equipped to start with. 44# ship weight, and I KNOW that the box and materials account for about 7, so it's not that bad. Oh, and every dept store bike is gonna have that sticker on it. Not necessarily a bad bike, just the store saving it's own ass from lawsuits. Every bike eventually breaks somewhere, and the store doesn't want to be held liable for it when it does.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by bones72751
    yes, but shocks are replaceable. From my and others i've talked to's experience, as long as you start off with a decent walgoose (which is what i'd consider the xr-comp) you can buy it for $300-400, ride it to start with, and upgrade as you go. I mean, you could put another 3-400 into it, and you'd have a decent equal to a bike shop bike, for probably around the same price. The frame on the comp is pretty damn good, not very heavy (for the price anyway), and nicely equipped to start with. 44# ship weight, and I KNOW that the box and materials account for about 7, so it's not that bad. Oh, and every dept store bike is gonna have that sticker on it. Not necessarily a bad bike, just the store saving it's own ass from lawsuits. Every bike eventually breaks somewhere, and the store doesn't want to be held liable for it when it does.
    Sorry, but no. The frames are cheap, heavy aluminum. The bearings (if there are any) are sub-par and the design doesn't compare to the quality of a bike shop-level full suspension bike. Tolerances are often way off, alignment can be poor and they tend to develop slop pretty quickly. When they do, good luck trying to get parts for them.

    Ya gotta start somewhere, but walgoose frames are hardly bike shop quality.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by bones72751
    decent walgoose (which is what i'd consider the xr-comp) you can buy it for $300-400, ride it to start with, and upgrade as you go. I mean, you could put another 3-400 into it, and you'd have a decent equal to a bike shop bike, for probably around the same price. .

    So you are saying it is a good idea to put $600 to $800 into a bike that will have a low quality frame and end up with something like the Mongoose Otera Pro that I bought from Performance last year out the door with a shock pump and performance membership for under $600? The extra $100 to $200 to go from a high end walgoose to a beginner frendly shop bike makes a lot of sense. That said. If your already have a XR-comp best thing to do is ride it and have fun. You'll know what you will need in your next bike when ready to buy up.

  9. #9
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    ok look, I'm not gonna be a troll here or anything, but have any of you owned this bike. Who's to say it's a bad frame. I do agree the components could be better, but from what I can tell the frame is perfectly fine. I rode my unc's the other day, and it feels like a pretty good bike. I'm not saying its equal to a 2k lbs fs, but its good. He takes some pretty rough trails, and nothings gone wrong with it. It does have bearings in the main pivot points. Some people want a decent fs w/o re-financing their house. I have ridden treks, specialized, kona, etc... and yes, their a world of difference. But this bike isn't bad either. Hell, right now I'm on a wallschwinn aluminum hardtail, and other than warping the wheels, It doesn't even give me problems on the trails. You just gotta know the bikes limits unless you wanna replace some stuff.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by bones72751
    ok look, I'm not gonna be a troll here or anything, but have any of you owned this bike. Who's to say it's a bad frame. I do agree the components could be better, but from what I can tell the frame is perfectly fine. I rode my unc's the other day, and it feels like a pretty good bike. I'm not saying its equal to a 2k lbs fs, but its good. He takes some pretty rough trails, and nothings gone wrong with it. It does have bearings in the main pivot points. Some people want a decent fs w/o re-financing their house. I have ridden treks, specialized, kona, etc... and yes, their a world of difference. But this bike isn't bad either. Hell, right now I'm on a wallschwinn aluminum hardtail, and other than warping the wheels, It doesn't even give me problems on the trails. You just gotta know the bikes limits unless you wanna replace some stuff.

    If it was a good frame, Dont you think it would be on the mongoose website? A walmart hardtail is still a bad idea, but better then a FS. a cheap full suspension frame has pretty much no R&D into it. Thats why its cheap. The rear triangles are dangerously designed if used on trails. I have seen many of them crack and cause major wrecks. Maybe it wont happen to you or anyone you know. Hopefully thats the case. As said above, paying 300-400 bucks and then upgrading with 300-400 bucks doesnt make sence. Good luck finding a rear shock to fit that bike that doesnt take most of that money to start with. ride it until it breaks and buy a nice hard tail that weighs half of that tank. You will be amazed at the difference.

  11. #11
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    Yeah, there's definitely a difference between this and a good hardtail. But they've been making this bike for a few years now with no recalls at all. I can guarantee it'll fall apart on a dh track or 4-6' drops, but for general trail riding it's perfectly fine (so far). I'm sure it's more cost effective to ride this then buy a new bike, but I personally don't see this bike breaking down on you if you do want to upgrade it. It wouldn't be on mongoose's site because it's not THAT good, but in my opinion it's not bad either. that's just my opinion though, and everyone has their own.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by bones72751
    Who's to say it's a bad frame.
    to be blunt, most of us here are better qualified to say than you are. There's a lot of experience floating around here, and quite a few of us have been in the exact same position you're in now. The fact is, it's not worth upgrading that frame.

  13. #13
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    to be blunt, most of us here are better qualified to say than you are.
    what makes that true. i'm sure you have more experiece than me, but that doesn't make me a moron. have you ridden, built, or worked on this bike?.. because i have done all three. i build at least 1 or 2 of this specific bike a month. So sure, you may be qualified to give your opinions and observations, but so am i.

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    I don't need to have worked on your exact bike to know about it. I've seen more bikes than I can count like it. I know where corners were cut to get a full suspension bike down to $400. I'm not saying don't enjoy the bike, just that upgrading it isn't worth the money.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by bones72751
    what makes that true. i'm sure you have more experiece than me, but that doesn't make me a moron. have you ridden, built, or worked on this bike?.. because i have done all three. i build at least 1 or 2 of this specific bike a month. So sure, you may be qualified to give your opinions and observations, but so am i.
    Building them when they're new, and working on them after they've been ridden significant miles is completely different. That's when the demons come out. Pivots are shot, shock bushings toast. Most of them come equipped with some no-name shock in an arbitrary size with a coil spring that will be appropriate for maybe 10% of riders, no source for heavier weight springs and no parts available to rebuild them. That's why they typically get kicked to the curb within a year.

    These are my issues with frames like this and they're really common. Higher end bikes have some of these problems as well, but they take far longer to appear due to higher quality parts, which are readily available if you need new ones. Plus, shops have the appropriate tools to replace them. Wal-mart and similar places do not.

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    These are my issues with frames like this and they're really common. Higher end bikes have some of these problems as well, but they take far longer to appear due to higher quality parts, which are readily available if you need new ones. Plus, shops have the appropriate tools to replace them. Wal-mart and similar places do not.
    Yeah, the rear shock is a no name. I'm really not saying that it's comparable to a lbs bike, cause it's not. But, if (and not that you would or should) put some money into it... it could be at least pretty close. I know my store does have the tools to replace most parts, and can easily order replacements from the manufacture, as can the customer after the product is purchased.

  17. #17
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    Ride it until something breaks. Then toss the toy in a dumpster and head to the LBS and buy a bike.

    Theres a reason why Walmart markets them in the Toy/Games department and not in the Fitness department.

  18. #18
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    I've got a buddy who owns one, I've ridden it. It now sits in the garage because a necessary component finally failed(hub). It was ridden 95% on pavement, the other 5% was on tame double track. The frame held together, albeit being incredibly heavy and having incredibly suspect welds. The brakes notibly suck, the suspension notibly sucks, and the wheels notibly suck. Everything else is definately subpar, just hasn't given any complete failures yet.

    I started with a Shcwalmart bike, Schwin Sidewinder, hardtail. It actually still works, but the welds are incredibly small, which is alarming. If you are going to deal with a Walmart bike, go with a hardtail, make sure you will enjoy the hobby, then use it as a spare/loaner and buy a decent hardtail at the LBS.

  19. #19
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    Yeah, it would be more beneficial to buy a lbs bike when something major breaks, but if it's something cheap that breaks, why not just replace/upgrade it? I don't really see a problem with that.

    I started with a Shcwalmart bike, Schwin Sidewinder, hardtail. It actually still works, but the welds are incredibly small, which is alarming. If you are going to deal with a Walmart bike, go with a hardtail, make sure you will enjoy the hobby, then use it as a spare/loaner and buy a decent hardtail at the LBS.
    I have a walmart bike now. Schwinn Aluminum comp, and it hasn't given me a bit of trouble that wasn't my fault. I've taken some pretty rough singletrail and only a derailleur fell apart because I rebuilt it and forgot loctite. I definitely go with hardtails, but my unc loves his xr comp, and he's a lot faster on it than I am on mine. You just have to make sure you get a bike that can handle what you plan on throwing at it. If it's a walbike, definitely go through the whole thing when you get it home, before you hit a trail.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by bones72751
    Yeah, it would be more beneficial to buy a lbs bike when something major breaks, but if it's something cheap that breaks, why not just replace/upgrade it? I don't really see a problem with that.
    ...because its going on a frame thats overweight and underbuilt.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by bones72751
    Yeah, it would be more beneficial to buy a lbs bike when something major breaks, but if it's something cheap that breaks, why not just replace/upgrade it? I don't really see a problem with that.



    I have a walmart bike now. Schwinn Aluminum comp, and it hasn't given me a bit of trouble that wasn't my fault. I've taken some pretty rough singletrail and only a derailleur fell apart because I rebuilt it and forgot loctite. I definitely go with hardtails, but my unc loves his xr comp, and he's a lot faster on it than I am on mine. You just have to make sure you get a bike that can handle what you plan on throwing at it. If it's a walbike, definitely go through the whole thing when you get it home, before you hit a trail.
    And therein lies a key issue. People that buy bikes at Wal-mart don't have the technical knowledge to tune a whole bike, and they shouldn't have to. When you buy a brand new bike, you expect that it's in tip-top shape, as it should be.

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    And therein lies a key issue. People that buy bikes at Wal-mart don't have the technical knowledge to tune a whole bike, and they shouldn't have to. When you buy a brand new bike, you expect that it's in tip-top shape, as it should be.
    You've got a point there. I personally do make sure my bikes are in as good of shape as possible when they go to the floor, but I know that's not the usual case at a dept store. If someone does want to know how to tune it up though, most everything is in the owners manuals.

  23. #23
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    Take this for what you will.
    several year ago, I bought a target schwinn s-60 dsx. i replaced damn near everything on the frame, replaced the rear shock with a coil model with adjustable rebound damping and a better spring rate, got a new fork, a rock shox dart3, then a rock shox tora... i rode races on it, including a super D, twice. and some local XC races. the bike was crap. lots of lateral flex, the single pivot point was a metal on metal bushing... But it wasnt dangerous, I gave it frequent inspections for signs of fatique. I knew it was a sub-par bike, but i also knew it was better than nothing. but i put a lot of money into it over the 2 or so years i rode it. probably put twice what i bought the thing for back into it. the upgrades helped the bikes performance, and made it safer to ride. I swaped the majority of the parts over to my new frame once i finally found one, a 2008 mongoose Khyber. i had to buy a few things, like a seatpost, new stem and handlebars, and some disc brakes, cables, etc... but all told most of the parts i put on the Target Schwinn were swapped to my new bike. and the rest of the decent parts went on my wifes bike, or are awaiting my hardtail project... the crankset, 9 speed drivetrain (x7), specialized seat, upgraded wheelset from an old bike (from the 90s!)... all came over to the khyber, and i threw the target Schwinn frame in the trash. It served it's purpose... BUT! I also know how to work on bikes, I have studied welding inspection, and worked as a welder/fabricator. I have expertise that kept me safe. I re-assembled, and adjusted the target bike when i brought it home, and rigorously inspected it after every couple rides, all these things are reasons NOT to buy department store bikes. there are tons more. making sure people are aware of the dangers is important. Making folks feel bad for riding what they have, however is just hateful, if they are riding the trails on what they have, its better than not riding at all.

    The bottom line is, its better to be riding something than nothing, (as long as it wont get you hurt). And you can find great deals on a used "bike shop bike" that will be far better than anything you'll get at walmart or target, or costco, or toys R us, or sams club, etc.... sometimes local shops will even sell used bikes! if you want to get into it, buy a used hardtail, if the bug bites you, upgrade, upgrade, upgrade! or leave this bike as is, buy something new later. but if you decide to upgrade parts like a mad man, be smart about it, with some thought given to future bike plans, and remember, be safe, and keep riding.

  24. #24
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    The bottom line is, its better to be riding something than nothing, (as long as it wont get you hurt). And you can find great deals on a used "bike shop bike" that will be far better than anything you'll get at walmart or target, or costco, or toys R us, or sams club, etc.... sometimes local shops will even sell used bikes! if you want to get into it, buy a used hardtail, if the bug bites you, upgrade, upgrade, upgrade! or leave this bike as is, buy something new later. but if you decide to upgrade parts like a mad man, be smart about it, with some thought given to future bike plans, and remember, be safe, and keep riding.
    Good point.

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