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  1. #1
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    Mongoose Team DH 26" Full Suspension



    Frame: 4-Bar alloy dual-suspension hydro-form
    Rear Shock: Coil spring, adjustable
    Fork: Rock Shox Dart1 suspension fork, 100mm
    Shifters: 24-speed SRAM SX4 Trigger Shifter system
    Stem: 31.8 Ahead Stem
    Handlebars: Carbon wrap Fat Bars, 31.8
    Crank Set: Suntour XR 24/34/43
    Front Derailleur: Suntour
    Rear Derailleur: SRAM SX4
    Brakes: ProMax mechanical dual disc
    Wheels: 26" Star "Speed" disc rims with camo, 32H
    Tires: Mongoose DH 26" x 2.35"
    Pedals: Mongoose Alloy platform
    Seat: Mongoose DH saddle with camo print, quick release

    Be brutal, be honest. Be brutally honest.
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  2. #2
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    98% of downhill bike/ freeride bikes have over 4'' of front & rear travel, hydraulic disk brakes, and a few other noticeable items . i dont think that is a true 4bar link rear suspension either. are you looking at getting in to DH / free ride? if inexperienced, then yes, i would suggest getting it as a starter bike. when your skills increase the need for more travel, a stronger frame and parts will for sure come in to play. i personally cant justify telling someone who is interested in getting in to dh or fr to get a 3000$ bike just to find out you dont like the style of biking then have to look at a 3k paper weight in the garage. start small and work your way up. as far as TeamDH goes... looks like something i would find at walmart ( not that there is anything wrong with that) but i would bring it to an actual bike shop to go completely through it as the 16 yearold at walmart just put the wheels on and put it on the show room floor. Team DH looks more like an all mountain trail bike, not really designed to take the abuse of DH or FR
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  3. #3
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    ight

    Quote Originally Posted by shwinn8
    98% of downhill bike/ freeride bikes have over 4'' of front & rear travel, hydraulic disk brakes, and a few other noticeable items . i dont think that is a true 4bar link rear suspension either. are you looking at getting in to DH / free ride? if inexperienced, then yes, i would suggest getting it as a starter bike. when your skills increase the need for more travel, a stronger frame and parts will for sure come in to play. i personally cant justify telling someone who is interested in getting in to dh or fr to get a 3000$ bike just to find out you dont like the style of biking then have to look at a 3k paper weight in the garage. start small and work your way up. as far as TeamDH goes... looks like something i would find at walmart ( not that there is anything wrong with that) but i would bring it to an actual bike shop to go completely through it as the 16 yearold at walmart just put the wheels on and put it on the show room floor. Team DH looks more like an all mountain trail bike, not really designed to take the abuse of DH or FR
    Thanks, that was good information that I can use.
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  4. #4
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    Looks strikingly similar to the Mongoose Pro Wing Series, from 2002 - 2006. Those were not Walmart bikes, but at the same time were not necessarily high end. I still have one, frame is heavy, but strong. The parts spect was not to good. I had a bunch of stuff laying around, Hydros, Fox Float, Manitou Minute 1 05' fork, Alivio Shifters and Deore derailleurs. Now it's a pretty worthy bike. Would not buy it then expect to put that much into it though ...

  5. #5
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    Gotney

    Quote Originally Posted by RSabarese
    Looks strikingly similar to the Mongoose Pro Wing Series, from 2002 - 2006. Those were not Walmart bikes, but at the same time were not necessarily high end. I still have one, frame is heavy, but strong. The parts spect was not to good. I had a bunch of stuff laying around, Hydros, Fox Float, Manitou Minute 1 05' fork, Alivio Shifters and Deore derailleurs. Now it's a pretty worthy bike. Would not buy it then expect to put that much into it though ...
    Got any pics of your finished build?
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  6. #6
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    Here is a picture. It had a Manitou Black on it then, but now has a Manitou Minute.'

    Mongoose Wing

  7. #7
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    Similar

    Quote Originally Posted by RSabarese
    Here is a picture. It had a Manitou Black on it then, but now has a Manitou Minute.'

    Mongoose Wing
    Looks very similar to the one above. Was this a hydro formed frame as well? I can tell some small changes are there between yours and the DH.
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  8. #8
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    Hydroforming uses fluid to work the mold instead of just pressure. The frame is very similar. Mongoose Pro (those only sold at an LBS and exist on the Mongoose website) such as the Wing series have more name brand parts. The bike you listed has a few, list the the rear derailleur, but then the really cheap parts like Promax discs, those are really the bottom of the bottom. The dart 1 is the absolute lowest Rockshox for made.

    Lastly, the Wing series was retired in 06 and was replaced by the Otero line. I like the look of the wing, but it's getting old in technology. I really is 04 or so in tech.

  9. #9
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    ummm

    Quote Originally Posted by RSabarese
    Hydroforming uses fluid to work the mold instead of just pressure. The frame is very similar. Mongoose Pro (those only sold at an LBS and exist on the Mongoose website) such as the Wing series have more name brand parts. The bike you listed has a few, list the the rear derailleur, but then the really cheap parts like Promax discs, those are really the bottom of the bottom. The dart 1 is the absolute lowest Rockshox for made.

    Lastly, the Wing series was retired in 06 and was replaced by the Otero line. I like the look of the wing, but it's getting old in technology. I really is 04 or so in tech.

    So, it wasn't hydro formed?
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  10. #10
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    I really don't know. I'm not sure it really maters how the tubes are formed. It's not a very high end bike. I may have an old schreen shot from a web page on mongoose.com.

    Are you planning to bu the Team DH?

  11. #11
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    Matters

    Quote Originally Posted by RSabarese
    I really don't know. I'm not sure it really maters how the tubes are formed. It's not a very high end bike. I may have an old schreen shot from a web page on mongoose.com.

    Are you planning to bu the Team DH?
    Well, it does matter actually. Hydro-forming produces a much stronger shape because the aluminium retains the same thickness, even on corners and edges. Pressing or stamping the form can weaken edges and corners by thinning the material or bending it beyond its limits, causing weak spots.

    I did pull the trigger on this one and so far I am very happy with it. It is lighter and stronger than my last bike and has some really cool features and upgrades.

    Here is the one I purchased, pre-tuning:


    Mongoose Team DH 26&quot; Full Suspension

    Mongoose Team DH 26&quot; Full Suspension

    Mongoose Team DH 26&quot; Full Suspension

    Mongoose Team DH 26&quot; Full Suspension

    If you can see the difference in the downtube and the re-enforcements on the top tube, you can tell that there are distinct changes in the frame. I can tell the idea might have come from the design of the bike you have but they definately made some vast improvements when they designed this one including the hydro-form tecnology and heat treated aluminium.
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  12. #12
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    Don't get caught up by if it's hydroformed or not; you're focusing on one little detail and missing the big picture. The design and build quality of the frame is much, much more important than if a tube is hydroformed or not.

    The big question is, what kind of riding are you looking to do?

  13. #13
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    Big

    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    Don't get caught up by if it's hydroformed or not; you're focusing on one little detail and missing the big picture. The design and build quality of the frame is much, much more important than if a tube is hydroformed or not.

    The big question is, what kind of riding are you looking to do?
    I disagree, the big picture is the frame, for it is the core and the heart of the whole system, and the design is one of the most rugged I have seen. The blue bike pictured above doesn't have the strength or thickness the silver one does at the head set or at other key points of stress on the frame. The basic shape is there but if you compare the two side by side you can see distinct differences.

    Hydro-forming does make a big difference, as I stated earlier, at key points such as curves and corners of the material used. Not only is the silver frame Hydro-formed it is also heat treated and hardened after the fact. This makes for the lightest and strongest forms possible with aluminium and it is apparent in the "flick-ability" of the bike at speed or on technical trails.

    As for the big question I will ask: How skilled is the rider?
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mongoose Pilot
    I disagree, the big picture is the frame, for it is the core and the heart of the whole system, and the design is one of the most rugged I have seen. The blue bike pictured above doesn't have the strength or thickness the silver one does at the head set or at other key points of stress on the frame. The basic shape is there but if you compare the two side by side you can see distinct differences.

    Hydro-forming does make a big difference, as I stated earlier, at key points such as curves and corners of the material used. Not only is the silver frame Hydro-formed it is also heat treated and hardened after the fact. This makes for the lightest and strongest forms possible with aluminium and it is apparent in the "flick-ability" of the bike at speed or on technical trails.

    As for the big question I will ask: How skilled is the rider?
    You're misunderstanding. Yes, the frame is the most important part, but you're focusing in on one aspect of the frame, when you need to be looking at it as a whole. The hydroforming isn't what makes the bike flickable, it's the geometry and the set up of the bike. This is what I'm saying, you're focusing on one part which, in the end, doesn't even have much to do with how the bike actually rides. There is a lot more in the frame than what you're, apparently, seeing.

    My question is, if you're sweating the frame so much, why buy a low end one?

  15. #15
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    2 geese

    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    You're misunderstanding. Yes, the frame is the most important part, but you're focusing in on one aspect of the frame, when you
    need to be looking at it as a whole. The hydroforming isn't what makes the bike
    flickable, it's the geometry and the set up of the bike. This is what I'm saying,
    you're focusing on one part which, in the end, doesn't even have much to do with
    how the bike actually rides. There is a lot more in the frame than what you're,
    apparently, seeing.

    My question is, if you're sweating the frame so much, why buy a low end one?
    Geometry has less to do with flickability than mass does and I don't need to do anything but pay taxes and die lol..

    RSabarese and I were comparing the similarities between the two bikes, as they are despite the basic shape, they are completely different.
    The frame and its mass, without components, has everything to do with flick-ability.
    Hydro-forming has a lot to do with flickability as well as it makes the frame strong,
    light and "flick-able". Quick response and control are everything in my style of riding.
    A steel frame of the same dimensions would have more mass and therefore would be
    less flick-able but, the mass would make for a better downhill bike.

    As far as the bike(read cost)goes it is just a step up from my last one. Before you say "save your money up and get a LBS bike" keep in mind it has been said
    a million times and I want to ride now and not later. This is just one of several
    short term goals on the way to my long term goal of buying a GT Force Carbon:



    At a 7k price tag I would be sitting around saving for quite some time. I'm taking donations if you care to contribute lol
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  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mongoose Pilot
    Geometry has less to do with flickability than mass does and I don't need to do anything but pay taxes and die lol..
    I'm sorry, but that's simply wrong. Maybe you need more experience, or maybe you need to hang out in the frame building forum more, but what you said is simply incorrect.

    Quote Originally Posted by Mongoose Pilot
    RSabarese and I were comparing the similarities between the two bikes, as they are despite the basic shape, they are completely different.
    The frame and its mass, without components, has everything to do with flick-ability.
    Hydro-forming has a lot to do with flickability as well as it makes the frame strong,
    light and "flick-able". Quick response and control are everything in my style of riding.
    A steel frame of the same dimensions would have more mass and therefore would be
    less flick-able but, the mass would make for a better downhill bike.
    Hydroforming has virtually nothing to do with flickability. In fact, generally a hydroformed frame will be heavier than an equivalent tubed frame, but will be stiffer and stronger (if designed well). The geometry, and in this case, the suspension design and layout are what you're feeling, and the those, along with the buildup, are what make the bike it's agility.

    What makes a downhill bike is, again, the geometry of the frame. The weight is only from making the frame strong enough for it's purpose. There are also many downhill bikes which are quite agile at speed.

    You're going to believe what you believe, but right now, either due to ignorance or inexperience, you have some pretty misguided beliefs about frames and how they do what they do, and ride like they ride. This could serve you very poorly in future purchases. Don't take my word for it though, and go talk to other people who know frames.

  17. #17
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    Brainiac

    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    I'm sorry, but that's simply wrong. Maybe you need more experience, or maybe you need to hang out in the frame building forum more, but what you said is simply incorrect.



    Hydroforming has virtually nothing to do with flickability. In fact, generally a hydroformed frame will be heavier than an equivalent tubed frame, but will be stiffer and stronger (if designed well). The geometry, and in this case, the suspension design and layout are what you're feeling, and the those, along with the buildup, are what make the bike it's agility.

    What makes a downhill bike is, again, the geometry of the frame. The weight is only from making the frame strong enough for it's purpose. There are also many downhill bikes which are quite agile at speed.

    You're going to believe what you believe, but right now, either due to ignorance or inexperience, you have some pretty misguided beliefs about frames and how they do what they do, and ride like they ride. This could serve you very poorly in future purchases. Don't take my word for it though, and go talk to other people who know frames.
    Ok tough guy, what do you think about the frame and the differences between the blue and silver one? Oh and thanks for calling me ignorant and inexperienced. I understand no one is allowed to be as smart or as experienced as you.
    Last edited by Mongoose Pilot; 09-11-2009 at 10:52 PM.
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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mongoose Pilot
    Ok tough guy, what do you think about the frame and the differences between the blue and silver one? Oh and thanks for calling me ignorant and inexperienced. I understand no one is allowed to be as smart or as experienced as you.
    Not a tough guy, I just call it like I see it. I also know a couple things about bikes.

    There are plenty of people who are smarter and more experienced than me. There are also a lot of people who aren't.
    Last edited by bad mechanic; 09-12-2009 at 06:43 AM.

  19. #19
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    I'm not going to get in the middle of this, but Mongoose Pilot, go look at the reviews on this site of the Mongoose Wing. There one common theme amongst them, "STRONG & HEAVY". Look at the top tube gusset on your bike verse mine, yours it welded in 3 spots, mine the entire top tube has a solid welded gusset (this picture migh make it difficult to see).

    In the end, I doubt it matters that much. I'm over 220 and ride very aggressivly and I can't seem to break it. It's not my dedicated do all bike, but I did ride it at Diablo Mountain bike park and managed to go OTB. It survived without a scratch.

  20. #20
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    Just curious mongoose pilot, is there a sticker anywhere on your bike that says "not intended for off-road use" or something to that effect.

    And just so you know they put exactly 1 hydro-formed tube on that bike just to dupe new mountain bikers like yourself, I guarantee your bike isn't any lighter or more "flickable" because of it, with the welds like your bike has your frame looks like it could snap if ridden like the name team dh implies.

  21. #21
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    Live

    Quote Originally Posted by RSabarese
    I'm not going to get in the middle of this, but Mongoose Pilot, go look at the reviews on this site of the Mongoose Wing. There one common theme amongst them, "STRONG & HEAVY". Look at the top tube gusset on your bike verse mine, yours it welded in 3 spots, mine the entire top tube has a solid welded gusset (this picture migh make it difficult to see).

    In the end, I doubt it matters that much. I'm over 220 and ride very aggressivly and I can't seem to break it. It's not my dedicated do all bike, but I did ride it at Diablo Mountain bike park and managed to go OTB. It survived without a scratch.

    I would have to see both bikes side by side live to make a call on it. I think the blue one is a decent bike and could handle some serious bombing. 220 down to a flat might be a bit much for the silver one. As far as the "dupe" mentioned the whole frame, except the 4 bar, was hydro-formed.

    The only sticker I have found says wear a helmet.

    10 cool points for OTB! I would give more but you didn't stick the landing lol.
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  22. #22
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    Thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by Flystagg
    Just curious mongoose pilot, is there a sticker anywhere on your bike that says "not intended for off-road use" or something to that effect.

    And just so you know they put exactly 1 hydro-formed tube on that bike just to dupe new mountain bikers like yourself, I guarantee your bike isn't any lighter or more "flickable" because of it, with the welds like your bike has your frame looks like it could snap if ridden like the name team dh implies.
    Thanks for the information. That was the whole purpose of this post, to gleen information from more experienced and skilled riders. Although, you do assume a lot.
    Last edited by Mongoose Pilot; 09-13-2009 at 01:15 AM.
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  23. #23
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    Dh

    I think the silver one looks better and tuffer. Very cool pics too.

  24. #24
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    If anyone was curious as to if the OP bike, is infact a department store bike, just look at the url hosting the photo.

    http://i.walmartimages.com/i/p/00/03...41_500X500.jpg

    Not that its a bad thing to have a Walmart bike, but be sure its components simply aren't up to the same tasks as a mountain bike built purely for mountain biking.

  25. #25
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    All true DHers have kickstands on their bikes....

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