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  1. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic View Post
    Axe and shwinn8 summed it up quite nicely for me. You get more for your money buying a nicer bike as opposed to upgrading a low end bike. It's just math. At the end of the day you end up with an expensive bike with a heavy, low quality frame.

    If you want to upgrade one, go ahead, just don't be under the mistaken idea that you'll save money in the long run, or you'll get it to the level of nicer bike for the same price.
    Look, I dont need a lecture. I made the point of that it is an option for some riders that dont want to (or cant) spend the large sum at once. I've also noticed a common habit here on this forum, where members here automatically "talk down" to anyone who owns/rides/ or even mentions less expensive bikes. Stop that ASAP! Not for me in particular, but rather for the newer riders out there who'll get the message that unless you spend $$$$$$ we dont want you around. That'll push people away from the sport. I've heard that dozens of times from riders who have joined here looking for info and or tech support, only to be ridiculed. They then get discouraged and go elsewhere. Even a rider of substantial experience such as myself is being hassled for even the mention that a cheaper bike could be an option for some riders.

    I never stated the Blackcomb would be on the same level as a much more expensive bike, but that it can be made into a "decent" bike without costing a ton. Browsing sales on jensonusa, pricepoint, CBO, wheel world, bluesky cycling and such can get you good parts at great deals, and allow you on a budget to make the Blackcomb (or any decent but cheap bike) into a better ride. I did this personally when I owned a Blackcomb as a extra bike (at the time I had 4 bikes; a DH bike, an XC/trail bike, a SS, and the Blackcomb) and know that you can do it for around $600-$700 if you find sales and have patience.
    Riding the Geese since '98! Check out my youtube videos at www.youtube.com/mongoosejake

  2. #52
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    wasnt going to ever be messed up trail riding
    No comment ( mall crawlers, they make me laugh.. nothing but a glorified mini van. should carry the same not made for off road use sticker)

    Why do you keep push people to our youtube page?( probably because you're getting paid per views through youtube because they do that kind of thing) Is it too hard to type what you have on here.( just wanted to randomly type in side the parentheses)
    '11 Jedi
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  3. #53
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    Holy cow, you guys will argue about ANYTHING.

    From Mountain Bike Action: "Mountain Cycle ... mountain bike builder who revolutionized the stodgy stick figure hard tail with its monocoque San Andrea dual suspension chassis- and led the way with the first full functional hydrolic disk brakes and inverted suspension forks ...."
    MOUNTAIN CYCLE BOUGHT BY KINESIS--DEC 21 | News | mountain-bike-action

    From Bike Magazine: One of the first big names in full suspension was Mountain Cycle. Itís hard to convey just how radical this company was back in 1991, when their San Andreas model debuted. ... It was the first monocoque mountain bike frame available to the general public and it sported squish front and rear (with an inverted fork, to boot). Oh, and at a time when V-Brakes were still in their infancy, the Mountain Cycle came equipped with hydraulic disc brakes.
    Tested: Mountain Cycle Battery

    The San Andreas obviously influenced the Blackcomb design because it was the first monocoque frame and the Blackcomb is a monocoque frame - as was the Intense M-1, which came out almost a decade after the San Andreas.

    Building up an inexpensive frame is not a cost effective way of getting a good performing bike. But it's like when people restore old cars. There's some nostalgia or emotion behind their purpose. And I can't stand when people bag on other people's bikes. No one suggested taking a Blackcomb on a modern DH course. And no one suggested you go out and buy one of these bikes and start upgrading.

    If you've got a frame lying around or get one for free, sometimes it's fun to build it up with parts from the parts bin or bargain hunt.
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by irishmongooserider View Post
    Look, I dont need a lecture. I made the point of that it is an option for some riders that dont want to (or cant) spend the large sum at once.

    We are trying to prevent people from spending more money in the long run by supporting the local bike shops and not low quality china built department store bikes

    I've also noticed a common habit here on this forum, where members here automatically "talk down" to anyone who owns/rides/ or even mentions less expensive bikes. Stop that ASAP!

    all depends on how one reads the big bad letters on the computer screen that get taken out of context as the letters don't show the authors emotions. most is constructive criticism. You are trying to help people and we are trying to protect people from making poor decisions

    Not for me in particular, but rather for the newer riders out there who'll get the message that unless you spend $$$$$$ we dont want you around. That'll push people away from the sport.

    me in particular ( if you hunt for some of my posts) I recommend to those interested in the sport to buy cheap to see if they like the sport. it's money better spent to buy a cheap bike to find out one doesn't like the sport verses spending thousands of dollars on a paperweight. if they do like it to then upgrade to a bike more suited to ones riding style

    I've heard that dozens of times from riders who have joined here looking for info and or tech support, only to be ridiculed. They then get discouraged and go elsewhere. Even a rider of substantial experience such as myself is being hassled for even the mention that a cheaper bike could be an option for some riders.

    dozens of riders? and where are those posts at?

    I never stated the Blackcomb would be on the same level as a much more expensive bike, but that it can be made into a "decent" bike without costing a ton. Browsing sales on jensonusa, pricepoint, CBO, wheel world, bluesky cycling and such can get you good parts at great deals, and allow you on a budget to make the Blackcomb into a better ride. I did this personally when I owned a Blackcomb as a extra bike and know that you can do it for around $600-$700 if you find sales and have patience.

    here's where we have issues again. It seams you are suggesting to buy a department store bike then to purchase/ upgrade the components with parts purchased on line(?). which in it's self (because not everyone like you and I can work on our own bikes) has to bring it to a bike shop and spend more money for those parts to be installed VERSES buying a bike that already has those parts on the bike. Walmart and Kmart sure as heck won't do it nor do I trust them to even assemble one. Bicycles have break in periods ( as i'm sure you know) and require periodic maintenance. maintenance that isn't offered at walmart and again most people don't know how to do or comfortable doing. Most LBS offer this as a perk for 6months to a year. Again! I'm not saying don't buy from a deportment store! I and others are trying to say is by spending a little bit more you save more in the long run.
    '11 Jedi
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  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by wmac View Post
    Holy cow, you guys will argue about ANYTHING.

    From Mountain Bike Action: "Mountain Cycle ... mountain bike builder who revolutionized the stodgy stick figure hard tail with its monocoque San Andrea dual suspension chassis- and led the way with the first full functional hydrolic disk brakes and inverted suspension forks ...."
    MOUNTAIN CYCLE BOUGHT BY KINESIS--DEC 21 | News | mountain-bike-action

    From Bike Magazine: One of the first big names in full suspension was Mountain Cycle. Itís hard to convey just how radical this company was back in 1991, when their San Andreas model debuted. ... It was the first monocoque mountain bike frame available to the general public and it sported squish front and rear (with an inverted fork, to boot). Oh, and at a time when V-Brakes were still in their infancy, the Mountain Cycle came equipped with hydraulic disc brakes.
    Tested: Mountain Cycle Battery

    The San Andreas obviously influenced the Blackcomb design because it was the first monocoque frame and the Blackcomb is a monocoque frame - as was the Intense M-1, which came out almost a decade after the San Andreas.
    So? I have my own opinion, just like you do. If you don't want anyone disagreeing with you then post on a blog and not a forum.

    Yes, Mountain Cycles were very eye catching, but they never really revolutionized DH like M1 did. In the history of DH the MC is a footnote. Personally I think it's because the rear suspension didn't work well enough, it didn't have enough travel, and the geometry was still too tight.

    Quote Originally Posted by wmac View Post
    Building up an inexpensive frame is not a cost effective way of getting a good performing bike.
    This is exactly what I've been saying.



    Quote Originally Posted by irishmongooserider View Post
    Look, I dont need a lecture. I made the point of that it is an option for some riders that dont want to (or cant) spend the large sum at once. I've also noticed a common habit here on this forum, where members here automatically "talk down" to anyone who owns/rides/ or even mentions less expensive bikes. Stop that ASAP! Not for me in particular, but rather for the newer riders out there who'll get the message that unless you spend $$$$$$ we dont want you around. That'll push people away from the sport. I've heard that dozens of times from riders who have joined here looking for info and or tech support, only to be ridiculed. They then get discouraged and go elsewhere. Even a rider of substantial experience such as myself is being hassled for even the mention that a cheaper bike could be an option for some riders.
    "I don't need a lecture" says the man with the massive posts.

    You need to reread what's been written. No one said not to ride the bike, or that a cheap bike cannot be enjoyed. In fact, quite the opposite. What people are saying is not to upgrade it, but rather put the money toward a new bike. The wisdom of this has been proven again and again.

    Don't put words in our mouths just because we're not agreeing with you.

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by irishmongooserider View Post
    I was already a top ten placing XC and DH rider at the state level
    Out of curiosity, which state, class, and year?

  7. #57
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    I say influenced, you say revolutionized - I say tomato, you say cucumber. It was the industry voices, the magazines I referenced, that made the claim that the San Andreas revolutionized mountain bike design.

    As for arguing and writing a blog, I made a comment that the Blackcomb frame was obviously influenced by a frame designed almost 25 years ago and you start arguing that the frame I referenced didn't have as much influence on frame design as some others.

    I say you guys will argue about anything because you can't take anything for what it is. What I find on this forum, a lot, is some people are happy with what they have until some azzhole tells them they shouldn't be happy with it. If someone asks, hey, I'm thinking about buying bike X for $250, then give your opinion. But if someone says, I've already bought bike X, say, cool, congratulations - let me know if you need any help!
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  8. #58
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    '11 Jedi
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  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic View Post
    Out of curiosity, which state, class, and year?
    High school varsity mountain bike racing in Kentucky, in 2002/2003/2004. My riding earned me a full college scholarship in the end. Now, going on 27 I have fond memories of those racing years, but now I have a successful sales career, a wife and two daughters so I've chose not to race anymore since being good requires a good amount of training and I'd rather spend time with my family.
    Riding the Geese since '98! Check out my youtube videos at www.youtube.com/mongoosejake

  10. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by shwinn8 View Post
    No comment ( mall crawlers, they make me laugh.. nothing but a glorified mini van. should carry the same not made for off road use sticker)

    Why do you keep push people to our youtube page?( probably because you're getting paid per views through youtube because they do that kind of thing) Is it too hard to type what you have on here.( just wanted to randomly type in side the parentheses)
    Now we have you telling me what vehicle I shouldn't drive.

    No, I do not make money off of youtube. Monetization is what it's called, and I don't even qualify, so if I did want to, I still couldn't. The link to YouTube is in my signature line, so it shows up no matter what. You don't have to click If you don't want to, but it's there if you're interested.

    I'm nearly done with this forum again, for the same reasons I left three years ago. Anytime that someone posts anything remotely supporting lower end bikes gets entangled into a long debate that's cumbersome to continue. I understand your guys viewpoint, and haven't argued against it, but rather stated a different viewpoint that the majority doesn't like.

    About the dozens of riders who've left this forum for the same reason, there's actually a whole forum started by individuals that left here... You guys pushed newer riders away with the talk of higher end or nothing. Saying that someone is riding a worthless bike, or one not worth fixing/upgrading (not that all on here did take that position, but many do) will drive people away. Other forums gain members, so good for them.
    Riding the Geese since '98! Check out my youtube videos at www.youtube.com/mongoosejake

  11. #61
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    Here's a guy who is passionate about a brand because he used to race the brand more than 15 years ago when the brand was still strong and legit in the competitive world. He makes some good points on his videos that the Mongoose, Pacific Cycles distributed, bikes are a good value at $300 compared to the low end of the big names like Trek that cost double. And I see is a bunch of bagging based on brand and retail sales outlets.

    You've got bad mechanic, who lists his two bikes as Schwinns (most likely really old frames) and Shwinn8, who lists his three bikes as really old frames, arguing that upgrading a heavy, outdated frame isn't cost effective.

    It's madness.
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  12. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by irishmongooserider View Post
    I'm nearly done with this forum again, for the same reasons I left three years ago. Anytime that someone posts anything remotely supporting lower end bikes gets entangled into a long debate that's cumbersome to continue.
    It pretty much looks like you painted yourself into this corner. Your thread titles appear intentionally charged and you argue every single counter argument to the point of butt-hurt because some don't step over to your point-of-view. Why is it so difficult to simply promote what you like and leave it?

    Quote Originally Posted by irishmongooserider View Post
    About the dozens of riders who've left this forum for the same reason, there's actually a whole forum started by individuals that left here...
    bigboxbikes.com
    Sometimes, you need to go fast enough that the trail is a blur to find clarity. -- Wild Bill

  13. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malibu412 View Post
    It pretty much looks like you painted yourself into this corner. Your thread titles appear intentionally charged and you argue every single counter argument to the point of butt-hurt because some don't step over to your point-of-view. Why is it so difficult to simply promote what you like and leave it?



    bigboxbikes.com
    I may have done so, getting myself into this position by... Posting about and in support of a brand I've liked for a long time and had good luck and even racing success with. Sure I'm the type to maintain my position against all others, as long as I don't get carried away, or lose sight of the topic. I apologize if I'm actually guilty of any wrongdoing here.

    Yes, that is the forum I'm referring to. I'd already been falsely accused of pushing people to my YouTube channel so I didn't want to add fuel to the fire so to speak by "pushing" people to another forum. There are mid to higher end riders there as well as bigboxbikes, all are welcome if interested, but not because I said so, lol.

    In the three years of not being a member here, I've found nothing to have changed, only that the elitism and self righteousness regarding high end bikes has only increased. Not all members here have shown this attitude, but enough to be a hassle to anyone that has an open minded liking of all bikes.
    Riding the Geese since '98! Check out my youtube videos at www.youtube.com/mongoosejake

  14. #64
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    never mind.. at this point it's just to humorous to comment anymore
    '11 Jedi
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  15. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by wmac View Post
    You've got bad mechanic, who lists his two bikes as Schwinns (most likely really old frames) and Shwinn8, who lists his three bikes as really old frames, arguing that upgrading a heavy, outdated frame isn't cost effective.
    There is a big difference between an old high end frame and and a newer low end frame.

  16. #66
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    So, if I buy $700 in parts and put them on a Blackcomb, it's different than putting $700 in parts on a 15 year old Schwinn?
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  17. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by wmac View Post
    So, if I buy $700 in parts and put them on a Blackcomb, it's different than putting $700 in parts on a 15 year old Schwinn?
    Absolutely. One is a high quality and high performance frame. The other one is a low quality and low performance frame. Do you really not see the difference or are you just trolling me now?

    I will say this, however. Unless a person has a very good reason to build up an old frame (even a Homegrown frame) they'll get more for their money buying a new bike.

  18. #68
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    since you said 15 years old yes, a 15 year old Schwinn Straight 6 frame is built stronger and able to be put through a hell of a lot more , the 15 year old Carbon fiber Homegrown All mountains are lighter and
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  19. #69
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    ^^^ and what?
    Sometimes, you need to go fast enough that the trail is a blur to find clarity. -- Wild Bill

  20. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic View Post
    Unless a person has a very good reason to build up an old frame (even a Homegrown frame) they'll get more for their money buying a new bike.
    ^This
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  21. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malibu412 View Post
    ^^^ and what?
    aaannnndddd.... i just forgot to delete that was all
    '11 Jedi
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  22. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by shwinn8 View Post
    never mind.. at this point it's just to humorous to comment anymore
    So, why keep commenting?
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  23. #73
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    yup
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  24. #74
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    This has to be one of the dumbest pissing matches.

  25. #75
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    Why is that?
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  26. #76
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    'Cuz all Moongoose/Walgoose/bigboxbike threads end up a train wreck.
    Sometimes, you need to go fast enough that the trail is a blur to find clarity. -- Wild Bill

  27. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malibu412 View Post
    'Cuz all Moongoose/Walgoose/bigboxbike threads end up a train wreck.
    This.

    My first bike was a Mongoose Otero. I thought it was the bees knees and everyone else spending all their money on higher end bikes were stupid. Then I blew out the rear linkage and realized that if riding is to become a passion, proper equipment is needed. Spending more money up front sometimes saves you a lot of headache and regret later.

  28. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by tangaroo View Post
    This.

    My first bike was a Mongoose Otero. I thought it was the bees knees and everyone else spending all their money on higher end bikes were stupid. Then I blew out the rear linkage and realized that if riding is to become a passion, proper equipment is needed. Spending more money up front sometimes saves you a lot of headache and regret later.
    Well, you learned something, didn't you? For most people, if their only choice was spend $800 or spend nothing, they would spend nothing and never get the chance to learn that lesson.

    Again, if someone does not have a bike yet and is requesting your opinion, steer them toward a proper MTB. If they already have a big box bike, let them be happy until they break it. When they do,mthey'll come asking how to fix it. That's when you tell them it's not worth fixing.
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  29. #79
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    I've been down the road of the wallyworld bike. I've ridden 10k dollar mountain bikes, and a lot in between.
    I am able to discern the difference in how an entry level, bike shop quality full suspension bike rides, Vs. the very same manufacturers higher end offerings. I can feel the difference in a couple degrees of head tube angle, or a shorter or longer chainstay.... I understand bicycle geometry. I also have about an 8 year background in welding and fabrication and will soon be building a frame jig to begin building my own bike frames, as such I've been researching a lot, and talking to a former professional frame builder to answer my fabrication and frame jig questions. I understand the science behind bicycles.

    Regarding the blackcomb, the ditch, the and the similar bikes from Schwinn... they are basically the same thing with slightly different components, and slightly different geometries, all of them copy old suspension designs. Not a single one uses a pivot bearing anywhere on the frame, its all bushing style connections full of stiction and/or play. They have a severe amount of lateral flex, what this means is, anytime you stand to climb or spring you are flexing the frame laterally, not to mention the suspension bob due to the rear shock having NO dampening whatsoever. The dept. store schwinn I bought to start riding again after a hiatus of several years would experience tire rub if I stood up to sprint or climb. The frames aren't dangerous, or more prone to breaking, mainly because they are severely overbuilt, heavy gauge tubing is used on all of them. The hazard for "off road riding" is mainly the fork, and wheels, as they aren't designed for mountain bikes, but just as general use products for bikes that might see some gravel roads, but mainly will roll down paved bike paths. For most people who buy these bikes, this is fine... They get out of them what they paid for them, and typically they last a few years and then get thrown out. Summer time at the bike shop is a parade of people pulling dept. store bikes out of storage and wanting to get them tuned up so they can ride... then they hear 80 bucks for a complete tune and junk the bike, starting all over again, "I only paid 150 for it!"

    The general attitude here is pretty much the best one to have:
    If you already have one, great, ride it, fix small things if they break, but don't invest much in this bike, and when it craps out, if you are really wanting to get into this sport, buy a bike shop quality bike, and keep at it.

    The attitude on used expressed by Irishmongooserider: just like you don't buy a used car from a private seller without having a mechanic check it over, the same should go for high end mountain bikes. the seller should agree to having a bike shop check it over, maybe meet you there with the bike. most shops offer free estimates, so have them check it out. it lets you know what you're getting into, as well as gives you bargaining room on the purchase, maybe the seller would knock off the cost that the shop gives you on the repairs. Don't forget though, if you are going to use a shop's services like this, you are sort of implying you plan to spend money with them, at the very least, buying whatever consumables you need from them, even if you can get them cheaper online and do it yourself.. maybe spend the extra 5 bucks on the new chain at your LBS instead of online, and buy your lubes and such there as well... MINIMUM, if you want that shop there to help you when you're stuck, you need to show them loyalty or they might not be around next time you need their mechanic.(not directed at you irishmongoose, just a "royal you").

    Dept. store bikes can be upgraded to a safe level for basic trail riding/XC. They will not be as pleasant to ride, will not handle as well, will not climb as well, will not descend as well, and will not last as long. but doing this will cost you as much as a good used bike which will last you longer, and perform better, making your experience more enjoyable. Additionally, there are factors in these low quality bikes that start to become safety issues all their own, excluding complete failure of components, there are aspects that a better quality bike wouldn't suffer. For example, the pogostick rebound of the rear shock on these bikes can lead to OTB crashes because there is no way to slow it down. The flimsy fork and wheels can cause difficulty navigating technical rock gardens, or rooty sections of trail, causing deflection of the front wheel, again, potentially causing OTB crash, or simple front tire washout, point is, you're more likely to crash on inferior equipment then you are with better parts. The list goes on, but unless you are a VERY casual rider, who ventures into the woods only a few times a year, and mainly rides paved paths and some gravel/dirt roads, riding less than once a week, You should not look to make a long term ride out of a wal-mart bike.


    this advice is an echo of posts I've made before, and the product of having been through upgrading a wal-mart bike, owning a "pro line" mongoose, working in a bike shop, and having metallurgical and metal fabrication knowledge. It can get you into riding, and that is awesome. And certain parts CAN translate over to a new bike. But the value in a bike shop quality bike is something that cannot be matched by dept. store mountain bike style bikes... and we didn't even get into frame sizing issues and proper fit, and how that relates to safety, comfort, pain while riding, etc.

    This post is already a novel, but I hope it reaches people it can help to make a better decision regarding their new bike purchase, or what to do with the mongoose blackcomb they just got at a yard sale for 50 bucks to get into mountain biking with.

    TLDR:
    dept store bikes are not worth lots of upgrades, the difference in the frames is hard to understand without a fair bit of knowledge of bicycle frame design, and material specifications, but just understand they are on average, at least 150% as heavy as a comparable frame on a bike shop brand bike, are more flexy, come only in one size, and are not as strong, though not unsafe. the weak parts are fork and wheels, and are dangerous if they fail. Buying used is fine, but get it checked by a bike mechanic before buying. Dept. stores sell toy bikes, understand that you are getting a toy bike meant for kids to ride around the neighborhood, and plan your riding, and expendatures accordingly.

  30. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by Iridethedirt View Post
    I've been down the road of the wallyworld bike...
    Excellent, excellent post.

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    This would be my infamous Mongoose Blackcomb known as "The Tank". I bought this bike in 2005 and it was my first mountain bike. I LIVED basketball for years, but as I got into my 40's and couldn't compete well with the 20 year olds anymore, I was missing that "passion" sport for awhile. On a whim, I decided to try mountain biking. I don't even recall why, I just remember I was more and more interested in it, and I had seen some at WalMart. I went down and bought a Mongoose 250 or some crap like that. I knew nothing, but it took me about 1 ride to know that it was a horrible bike. I returned it and then upgraded to the Blackcomb...it was $350 and I thought I was throwing down some serious cash. There was a serious of trails in the met park behind my house. It gassed me just riding a few miles, but I ended up coming up with a good flow of trails that was about 5 1/2 miles. I couldn't believe how this bike would just romp over anything in it's path. I couldn't wait to get home everyday to try to beat my time. I couldn't believe someone would spend thousands of dollars for a "proper" mountain bike. I did, however, have a bike shop guy set it up the best he could, so it was better than your average Wallybike.

    My dad and I went to Colorado on a trip and I talked him into renting some mountain bikes. He enjoyed it so much that he was interested in buying one. We talked about it and decided on a mid-level Full Suspension bike for each of us. Now I was starting to see why these bikes were so much better. That bike was night and day from the Blackcomb. It was SO much better in every way. But I can say this. That old Mongoose was built like a brick ****-house. While my other bikes were breaking, the 'goose was always there as a backup. I was talking with one of my friends at the local bike shop, complaining that my expensive bikes were breaking, but my old beater WalMart bike never had a problem. He said that was because it was made of iron, and couldn't be broken. Still like that line! I kept the old bike around and rode it on occasion to make things harder for myself, and to appreciate what I had. I have beaten the living stink out of this bike, and somehow it just keeps on going.

    Everyone would call it "The Tank", so I went with it. I took the original stickers off, and some Tank stickers made that I applied. I put the heaviest and slowest Kenda Stick-E Nevegals on it to make it heavier and harder to pedal. I bought a dirt lid to wear while I rode that behemoth just for effect. When I barrel by on a rocky trail, it sounds like a garbage truck just rolled by. The brakes and suspension are atrocious. I ride it now and it is like a baseball player warming up with a fungo bat. He swings that heavy ass thing around for awhile, then when he picks up that regular bat it feels like bamboo.

    It is for fun, agony, and nostalgia. The bottom line on this bike, however, is that I would not recommend it to a first timer trying to get into the sport. I would probably recommend a hardtail from one of the bigger company's that you can get for a very decent price...or search over Craigslist and you can find a lot of good, older bikes for a very decent price that would work totally fine for someone new to the sport.





    Mongoose Blackcomb WHAT UP?-tank.jpg
    Last edited by smokehouse4444; 02-14-2013 at 08:47 PM.

  32. #82
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    Neat!
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  33. #83
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    Yup. I'm resurrecting this "dead horse" thread. If you can read thru all the elitist vs humble pissing contests, there's actually some good information in here about when to and not to upgrade components and frames. So, thank you for that.
    I am picking up a Blackcomb for $50. I simply love the look of the bike, and for my skill set and future goals on a mountain bike, the Blackcomb will always be up to my riding.
    My plan is to upgrade it as I find components that are high end, low cost, and great condition.
    The plans are for BB7s, a good front and rear shock with as much travel as the frame can allow, and good dampening.
    Deore XT or XTR and 8 or 9 Speed.

    Mine and my girls favorite colors are royal purple and Hunter green, so the frame will get royal purple powder coat and Hunter green accents. It'll get fenders cuz I don't like spraying mud and water any more than needed.

    When I'm done, I'll have a very distinctive bike that will forever be more capable than I am. I don't expect to invest more than $500 into it, including paint, powder coat, and decals.
    As long as I maintain it properly, there won't be a need to ever replace it.

    In my book, that formula adds up to a win.
    As for you elitists who want to tell me and my kind what a waste this project is, keep running your mouth and screwing up the perception of the sport for newcomers. Those of us with a brain and a bit of understanding of a person's needs, desires, and pocket book, will keep doing our best to counteract the damage you do.

    Now its time to see if the guy I spoke to last week still has the XT shifters and derailleurs for $60! Ah, shopping!

  34. #84
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    Oh good grief.

    Quote Originally Posted by WisdomWarlord View Post
    When I'm done, I'll have a very distinctive bike that will forever be more capable than I am. I don't expect to invest more than $500 into it, including paint, powder coat, and decals. As long as I maintain it properly, there won't be a need to ever replace it.
    If that floats your boat, enjoy. Just be aware you'll end up with less bike for your money upgrading it, as opposed to taking that money and buying higher end to begin with.

    Quote Originally Posted by WisdomWarlord View Post
    As for you elitists who want to tell me and my kind what a waste this project is, keep running your mouth and screwing up the perception of the sport for newcomers. Those of us with a brain and a bit of understanding of a person's needs, desires, and pocket book, will keep doing our best to counteract the damage you do.
    Perhaps you should read this thread again. This isn't about elitist versus new people, or attitudes, or humility. This thread discusses the basic fact that while a department store bike is worth riding and maintaining, that you get significantly less value for your money upgrading one as opposed to just buying a higher end bike. The numbers don't lie on that one.

    So instead of being condescending to us, maybe understand that a lot of us got into riding because of a department store bike, tried upgrading them, and learned some lessons the more expensive way.

  35. #85
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    Lurker of the Decade Award goes to: WisdomWarlord!

    Joined two years ago and saved up all his passion and pennies so he could post up this flame bait as his first. I'm surprised you remembered your user name and password.

    And the train wreck rolls on...
    Sometimes, you need to go fast enough that the trail is a blur to find clarity. -- Wild Bill

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    Does the Mongoose Blackcomb have trigger shifters? Also, what type of fork does it
    have?

    Thanks!

  37. #87
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    This is going to be amazing!
    No, YOU don't understand. You're making an ass of yourself for all of eternity.

  38. #88
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    I am a noob. I have one of the later red Blackcombs. I purchased it complete, new, from wallyworld for 90 bucks a long time ago because it had light rust on the cheaper raw metal bits. Some steal wool took care of that.

    I'm much more aggressive than your casual rider. I raced dirt bikes in a jr class a long time ago and I'm pretty hard on my equipment. I'm also do all of my own mechanic work because I enjoy learning and working on things (manual and youtube are great tools as well).

    I do wish I could bring myself to spend 1000 or more on a bicycle I may ride on a trail once a month (more frequent of late seems how I now have many miles of trails to ride)... but the blackcomb has done fine. I've gone through everything, cleaned and greased and checked all the bolts when I first got it.

    I have replaced a rim I tried to true myself (now I know how to do better, lmbo) and I'm replacing a derailleur I smashed.

    My only advice, as with any other sport, make sure everything is in working condition, and wear your protective gear. Don't let people look down on you. They're not the sort of ppl you want to be hanging out with in the first place. And don't look down on others. We ride what we can, when we can.

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