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  1. #1
    CTB
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    Continuation of Pedals Discussion

    Rather than keep the pedal discussion going in the Titanium Part thread, I thought I'd start this thread with an update.

    I'm not overly educated when it comes to clipless pedals, so I decided to do some research after a quick ride on a friend's bike proved that his pedals were much easier for me to use than my own. I began to think I've been soured on them due to the specific parts I have and not necessarily the SPD concept. Salient points:

    * I did not know that Shimano makes two flavors of cleats; the SH51 "single direction" cleat, and the SH56 "multi-angle release" cleat. The pedals all ship with SH51's as standard, it seems. The 56 has a beveled front edge that enables you to roll your foot out of the clips, as opposed to only being able to rotate in the horizontal plane to get out. Since I couldn't find pictures of the difference online, here they are. Note that the top cleat is a Wellgo 97A, which is essentially the same as an SH51.




    * What I had used in the past were the 1998 Scott clipless pedals that came with my Moab, along with Wellgo 98A cleats. These are a single direction cleat.




    * I installed a friend's spare set of Shimano M520 pedals onto my bike; I put an SH51 cleat on one shoe and an SH56 on the other, just to see. Because of the multi-angle release, I had to dial up the tension two full turns on that pedal to get equivalent retention as the single direction.



    * Without question, the multi-angle cleat is for me. I had two emergency offs on the test ride, one to each side. I got the multi cleat out easily; I did not get the single one out, and as a result was impaled in the leg over 1/4" deep with a thorn when I toppled. My natural instinct is to roll my foot out, and the 56's allow me to do that. The 51's say, "Sorry, you're going down with the ship" when I do that.

    * I then removed one of the Shimano pedals and put on one of my Scotts. The Scott is far more difficult for me to clip into than the Shimano, and it offers much less float (almost none). Release with the multi cleat was about the same, but clipping in was very annoying for me.

    * My shoes are Shimano SH-MT50G mid-tops.



    So what this boils down to is that when money is available, I will get a set of these economical M520 pedals and a set of SH56 cleats. Hopefully this info is helpful to somebody out there looking for pedals, etc.

  2. #2
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    Nice to hear you're giving clipless another shot. The extra power you get is surprising.

    Based on what you wrote, I'd say Eggbeaters definitely aren't for you. While they're great for the knees, you definitely can't twist out of them, and their extra float would just make it even harder for you to get out quickly.

  3. #3
    CTB
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    I believe the Shimanos have 4 of float, while the EB's have 6. The amount the Shimanos have seems to be compatible with me knees, so I think I've found a good setup. Now to become employed again so that I can afford to get that setup.

  4. #4
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    Eggbeaters have between 15 and 20 degrees of float. Beautiful, comfortable, huggable degrees of float.

  5. #5
    CTB
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    Oh that's right, they have the directional cleats that pick the float. So far I think I'm ok with what the Shimanos offer, but it's good to know the choices out there if they don't.

  6. #6
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    Come to think of it I had Scott pedals on my s20 and I hated them so I bought the shimano 747's and I loved those pedals. Then a friend turned me on to egg beaters and that is what I use now.

    Ken

  7. #7
    CTB
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    A ha, so it's not just me.

  8. #8
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    The funny thing is, I liked the Scott pedals until they started hurting my knee.

  9. #9
    CTB
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    Not having anything else to compare to, I had assumed that the Scotts worked like any other pedal. Now I see I was wrong, at least for me and however it is that I attempt to clip in and out. I guess that's why we have so many choices.

  10. #10
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    So I just installed those Scott Clipless pedals on my HG, and have been on a couple rides. Having never done clipless before, I like them. But I noticed a funny noise that seems to be coming from the pedals when I'm pedaling. (Never heard it when I had platforms) Kinda sounds like a rubbing/creaking noise. I have the pedals set at the lowest clamping power.
    Is it from the cleats rubbing around in the pedal? Do I need to tighten them?
    How much should I tighten at a time?

  11. #11
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    Well I tightened the pedals up. I finally found the little gauge on the pedal that shows where they're tightened to. Adjusting them in the dark isn't good.
    The noise has somewhat gone away, but it's still there a little. Definitely from the cleats interacting with the pedal. Kind of like a popping / creaking noise. Should you grease or WD40 these things or anything like that?

  12. #12
    CTB
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    Wish I could help you, Blue, but I'm new to the clipless game myself and never had that type of noise with my Scotts when I used them. I just now installed a set of the M520's I talked about above (the same ones, actually...my buddy sold me his) and have only used them for 2 rides thus far.

    I'd ride them a few more times and see if everything wears in and quiets down for you. I realize that's kind of like the Microsoft "just reboot it" answer, but that's what I'd do first.

  13. #13
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    I can tell you it wasn't the pedals. My crank arm came off tonight while riding. Luckily it came off after I climbed a hill.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by CTB
    I just now installed a set of the M520's I talked about above (the same ones, actually...my buddy sold me his) and have only used them for 2 rides thus far.
    How do you like them thus far?

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by blue72beetle
    I can tell you it wasn't the pedals. My crank arm came off tonight while riding. Luckily it came off after I climbed a hill.
    Switch over to Shimano Hollowtech II (external bearing BB) and never worry about a crank arm coming loose again.

  16. #16
    CTB
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    Quote Originally Posted by bad mechanic
    How do you like them thus far?
    They're hit and miss. I've had two crashes that would have been completely avoidable with regular old pedals/cages, one of which left me with a crap thumb. A quick dab of the foot would have kept me on my way, but nope, it happened too fast to clip out and down I went in the last 1/4-mile of the trail.

    As long as the trail is fast and flowing, they're fine. As soon as the going gets tough and there is a chance of getting faced suddenly, all bets are off. I still vastly prefer cages to them for instances like this, but for power and foot clearance, the clipless are better. So one must choose one's evil. They're the best clipless success I've had, but that only means so much.

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