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  1. #1
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    Bringing dog to Greenbush trails

    Just wondering if bringing a dog along while I bike on the Greenbush trails is allowed?

  2. #2
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    I do all the time! Its one of our favorite things to do! Its never too crowded where he'd be underfoot or in the way like Muir is, and as long as its not hunting season I never worry about him.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hiebs915 View Post
    Just wondering if bringing a dog along while I bike on the Greenbush trails is allowed?
    I'm pretty sure that dogs are allowed. I've seen a few mountain bikers and a hiker or two with dogs on the trails.

    As long as they're not leaving doggie bombs in the middle of the trail and follow pretty close to you, I don't see anyone caring or the rules changing. Greenbush never gets crowded like the Southern Kettles, so there's a good chance you won't even run into any other riders while you're out.

  4. #4
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    This is great news! I'd like to bring my smaller golden retriever. She loves people and is really nice so I don't think she'd cause any trouble.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hiebs915 View Post
    She loves people and is really nice so I don't think she'd cause any trouble.
    Well, if you read any of the "attacked by dog" threads that come up here every once in a while, you'll realize there are a lot of people that view a loose dog running around as an "attack". So it's usually best to keep a lookout for other trail users and get the dog leashed before you encounter them. That's why I don't ride with my dog, it's just too much to keep track of.

    As to what is allowed, this is from the DNR website for Northern Kettles "Pets must be on a leash no longer than 8 feet, under control, and attended at all times, unless in a designated area that allows pets to be off-leash.'
    That's pretty standard for most trails in the state. So technically there are very few places where you can take your dog off leash outside of a dog park or special use area (hunting training areas), but enforcement of these rules vary quite a bit. So it's more a matter of figuring out where off-leash is tolerated (not strictly enforced) and taking your chances.
    Warning: may contain sarcasm and/or crap made up in an attempt to feel important.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hiebs915 View Post
    Just wondering if bringing a dog along while I bike on the Greenbush trails is allowed?
    I've ridden with my black lab at Greenbush. I wouldn't worry too much about it as long as your dog is under control. Also, keep in mind that during the summer you not work your dog too hard. You wouldn't want to give your dog heat exhaustion. My lab's max is about 10 miles of riding unless we are somewhere with a water for him to swim and cool down. It's good idea to take more frequent breaks to give your dog water while riding. Hope you have fun!

  7. #7
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    Do you keep your lab on a leash or just leave him run free?

    If my dog was unleashed I doubt she would go far... She likes to stick by me.

  8. #8
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    WI State parks recently opened up many parks to hunting and trapping, something that you may want to consider if you have an unleashed dog. There is an minimum distance from trails that they can hunt or trap, not 100% sure what that is but I remember it being a bit closer than I expected.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by captainmorgan View Post
    I do all the time! Its one of our favorite things to do! Its never too crowded where he'd be underfoot or in the way like Muir is, and as long as its not hunting season I never worry about him.
    Are you simply oblivious to the needs of others or are you rude? I'll give you the benefit of the doubt and just go with "oblivious." Here's a clue for you as to why the vast majority of people don't bring unleashed animals on mountain bike trails:

    1. It's dangerous for you. You're generally on singletrack. It's narrow. The idea that dogs, even your dog, is predictable in its movements is insane.
    2. It's dangerous for your dog. Singletrack curves and swings around. People on bikes come flying around these curves. I cannot fathom bringing one of my animals onto singletrack unleashed. Additionally, you expose your dog to humans who don't share the same affections for canines that I do. If I encountered you doing this, I certainly would not take it out on the dog. He/she didn't choose a clueless and/or rude owner. However, you will undoubtedly encounter folks who regard a dog with little more empathy than a marauding cockroach. Why in the world would you want to place your animal in a situation where one of these types of people feels threatened or angered by the presence of your dog? If your dog defends itself by biting, you run a high risk of the animal having to be euthanized. Nice.
    3. It's dangerous for other humans. This is self-evident. You probably realize it at this point. Now you must decide that either your wants outweigh the needs of others or you could just leave the dog at home.
    4. You expose yourself to civil liability. If another rider hits your dog and is hurt, you expose yourself to civil proceedings. If your dog was off a leash and caused an accident in which I was hurt and my bike was damaged, I would expect you to compensate me for everything, plus something on top of that simply for being so grossly ignorant and/or rude. I wouldn't blame anyone for bringing an action against you. Given the rules governing these trails, you wouldn't have a leg to stand on, even if you leaned on those extra four you have at your side...when you haven't lost track.
    5. People who leave their dogs at home generally care a bit more about the animal. There was another genius on here some months back defiantly claiming that I and everyone else need to adjust to his desires to bring his dog everywhere. I asked him where he carries the water for his animal when he's out riding for hours. No response. What a shocker. If you are riding 10 miles, your dog is running 20. Through the snow. Dogs are not camels. They require a lot of hydration when they are exercising. If you do nothing else, please bring along some water specifically for the animal. As you may know, eating snow is a net loss of energy for human or animal. That doesn't cut it. Bring along some water and save the snow for me.

  10. #10
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    Oblivious or rude....I think the lecture falls in the latter category. Your opinion isn't necessarily unfounded but your presentation undermines the credibility.

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