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  1. #1
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    IL/WI members take a look please.....

    I posted a "what bike to buy" in the general section and would like your opinions based on knowledge of Kettle/Palos, etc what you would recommend.

    http://forums.mtbr.com/bike-frame-discussion/finally-my-what-bike-buy-thread-long-493908.html#post5405736

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    aka greyranger
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    which bike

    Around this area( We ride Palos alot), full sus is not necessary. The group I ride with we all have them. We take a couple of trips each year where the FS comes in very handy. A 29 inch hardtail would be great for Palos and Kettle. You really need to get on them and see which one feels best. Good luck

  3. #3
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    I agree, but...

    I agree that a FS isn't necessary for most/all of your riding in the area, BUT for me a FS has helped keep me in the saddle. With my back and knees, taking as much strain off them as possible is a good thing and now I ride urban a bit more like in the old days. To each his own. A HT makes you a soother rider, a FS smooths the ride out. I'm already a smooth rider, now the rides a bit smoother. Different strokes for different folks.
    Keep the Rubber Side Down

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by SG333e
    I posted a "what bike to buy" in the general section and would like your opinions based on knowledge of Kettle/Palos, etc what you would recommend.

    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?p=5405736

    Thanks in advance.
    I would recommend a 853 Reynold steel hardtail. Something like a Jamis Dragon, which I just happen to be selling.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by ErvSpanks
    I agree that a FS isn't necessary for most/all of your riding in the area, BUT for me a FS has helped keep me in the saddle. With my back and knees, taking as much strain off them as possible is a good thing and now I ride urban a bit more like in the old days. To each his own. A HT makes you a soother rider, a FS smooths the ride out. I'm already a smooth rider, now the rides a bit smoother. Different strokes for different folks.
    I'd like to hear more about what FS does to smooth things out. I was rear ended last year, and my back was never quite 100%. I still rode through it but am curious if this could help.

    Thanks in advance.

  6. #6
    aka greyranger
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    smooth out

    Quote Originally Posted by SG333e
    I'd like to hear more about what FS does to smooth things out. I was rear ended last year, and my back was never quite 100%. I still rode through it but am curious if this could help.

    Thanks in advance.
    Not the most technical answer but here it goes. With a hard tail, your legs act as shocks as you move over obstacles. That vibration transmits up to your back. I fell out of the garage 2 years back and I was happy that I had FS. You can get a 4 inch FS that will take the edge off and still give you great xc action. Take a look at the new Fishers. Good luck.

  7. #7
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    In the midwest, I ride a SS 29r(rig) everyday. At your price point the new Cobia would be fine. FS is nice, but not necessary here.

  8. #8
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    if you live in Illinois I would stick with a hardtail. I have been riding for a while now....looked into a full suspension but people that switch to that always go back to the hardtail. You can still do SOME technical riding, I have. I believe its all a personal preference. If it helps your back out then do that.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by SG333e
    I'd like to hear more about what FS does to smooth things out. I was rear ended last year, and my back was never quite 100%. I still rode through it but am curious if this could help.

    Thanks in advance.
    I had a car accident in '04 that wrenched my back. Phys. Therapist said to stop riding bumpy dirt trails. i said no way, so she said to get a FS bike at the least. I rode happily for a year or two w/o problems. Then I had a suspension bolt break and the bike was in the shop for two weeks while warranty issues were sorted out. I rode my HT in the interim and on the second ride, on the same trails I was riding before, I threw my back out again! After getting over that, I only rode my FS and have been fine since.

    That told me all I needed to know about riding FS bikes.
    Last edited by Muddy D; 03-17-2009 at 08:22 AM.
    Life is a bowl of fruit, and I am trying to not bite into the mold.

  10. #10
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    Palos Is my home stomping grounds and I too have back issues and have been riding Full suspension and would never go back. The new FS bikes are so sweet that a lot of the positives of a hardtail are negated.
    Saddle up, Effendi. We ride.

  11. #11
    Weird Eh
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    Does everyone who rides Palos have back issues

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by I Drink Blatz
    Does everyone who rides Palos have back issues
    Apparently the place is rougher on us that one would expect. Maybe I should get a FS recumbent next, so I don't have far to fall on all these nasty trails. That is, unless Barcalounger plan to go one better and buy Iron Horse—and release the world's first FS with build-in cooler and a home theater system! Now that's a bike!
    Last edited by Muddy D; 03-17-2009 at 08:52 AM.
    Life is a bowl of fruit, and I am trying to not bite into the mold.

  13. #13
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    Full Suspension is always necessary in my opinion hehe. (L1 disc problems in lower back, not fun)

  14. #14
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    Follow Up

    Hey there,

    Just an FYI, I picked up a GF HiFi Plus 29er a week ago. Have about 30 miles on just playing around on the local forest preserve paths. So far it's great, the only problem is it feels a little sluggish (couldn't possibly be the rider). I posted a thread in the 29er section about that and many agree Bonty ACX tires are very high rolling resistance. I'm thinking about switching to Vulpines or maybe Kenda Small Block 8's.

    http://www.wtb.com/products/tires/29er/vulpine29er/

    http://www.kendausa.com/bicycle/JohnTomac.html

    My question for you guys is are these good enough for Kettle/Palos on a dry day? I'm assuming yes but want to hear from the guys who are familiar with the area.

    Thanks in advance.

    Eric

  15. #15
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    Careful of the Kenda Small Blocks Use them only when dry. They pack up with mud pretty fast if it`s wet and you basically have a mud slick.

  16. #16
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    The ACX aren't my favorite tire, but they work. I wouldn't switch till you put some more miles on them. IMHO it's wet here a lot more often than it's dry.

    I am currently running a Rampage on the front and a Klaw on the back.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tooth McGavin
    if you live in Illinois I would stick with a hardtail. I have been riding for a while now....looked into a full suspension but people that switch to that always go back to the hardtail. You can still do SOME technical riding, I have. I believe its all a personal preference. If it helps your back out then do that.
    Eh, even stuff like palos and kickapoo are more fun on a dualie. A light FS xc bike isn't much harder to pedal, and the added suspension will make a serious difference in fatigue and fun factor. Unless money is an issue, get the FS.

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