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  1. #1
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    I know, but I have to get some advice for this.

    Alright, I am sure this has been asked a million times, but I am having a hard time finding the answer I want. I am in the market this winter for a new bike.

    Right now, I am riding a Trek 4300, but the frame is an 18" and I am 6'4. I also way 280lbs right now. I am trying to decide between a 29" HT or FS. My question is from your experience what is the best bike for Cincinnati, Ohio and surrounding areas?

    I am a bit reckless so I figure FS would be the way to go. My budget is 2000, but I wouldn't mind if I stay under that number. So I give you the floor to convince me.

  2. #2
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    If I were you, I'd look for a decent XL or XXL hardtail with better components. At your height and weight you are going to destroy the lower end stuff pretty quickly. Pay particular attention to the shifters and wheels. If you go with a FS at that price point, you are going to end up with a lot of junk, and face extra cost for replacement parts and repairs down the road.

    Thats my 2c.
    Grit, spit, and a whole lot of duct tape!

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stupendous Man View Post
    If I were you, I'd look for a decent XL or XXL hardtail with better components. At your height and weight you are going to destroy the lower end stuff pretty quickly. Pay particular attention to the shifters and wheels. If you go with a FS at that price point, you are going to end up with a lot of junk, and face extra cost for replacement parts and repairs down the road.

    Thats my 2c.
    Alright, with that, I will now ask do you have any suggestions? I have looked at a few different hardtails and have found a few that were nice, but I am not familiar with wheels and to a lesser extent components. My only concern with a HT is that when I get more comfortable and more courageous I am going to jump something and the back end is going to give out. So another question is will a HT hold up a 2' drop with me on it?

  4. #4
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    Sorry, I dont have much in the way of specific recommendations. Its hard for me to offer that kind of advice...but I have a buddy who is your size, who has gone through 3 FS fames (Giant Anthem), breaking each one in under a year. He since moved up to a Spec stumpjumper (I think, not sure of the model). If you are wanting to do drops and aggressive riding, then you may very well want a FS trail/all mountain bike, but a 2K budget may limit your choices. You may want to look to the used market or try stretching your budget.
    Grit, spit, and a whole lot of duct tape!

  5. #5
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    I have thought about the used route and I regularly keep my eye on eBay and see a lot of great deals. I guess more than anything I want to understand more about wheels and what makes them better than others.I have read about wheels being double walled and other things, but like components and forks what are thing to look for in wheels?

  6. #6
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    For the Cincy area, I would go with a steel hard tail. You can't beat steel IMO.

  7. #7
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    These guys can help you out...and they arent too far away. Any one of these will be in your budget and are far better component wise than brands at similar pricepoint. Have a look
    Airborne Bicycles. HobGoblin

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by dhpeteinsc View Post
    These guys can help you out...and they arent too far away. Any one of these will be in your budget and are far better component wise than brands at similar pricepoint. Have a look
    Airborne Bicycles. HobGoblin
    Wow, this bike looks like a winner. I like all of the components offered and the suspension is definitely what I have been looking for. What can you tell me about the wheels? I am a clydesdale and I will put quite a lot of stress on the bike with my riding, do you think those wheels will hold up?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by WasteMindu View Post
    Wow, this bike looks like a winner. I like all of the components offered and the suspension is definitely what I have been looking for. What can you tell me about the wheels? I am a clydesdale and I will put quite a lot of stress on the bike with my riding, do you think those wheels will hold up?
    I noticed in your other post that you mentioned jumping the bike on some smaller 2 foot jumps.

    Any XC bike is not really meant for that, especially when you throw the weight factor in there.

    The Goblin should do fine for you as long as you treat/ride it as an XC bike. At your weight you will burn thru components faster, like chain/gears/spokes/wheels. If you get the Goblin I would probably recommend looking at buying a more heavy-duty wheelset, like something designed for all-mountain use.

    If you want to jump or huck the bike, I might suggest looking at something like one of the new crop of all-mountain HT 29ers that are on the market, like the Trek Stache or the Diamondback Mason. Those bikes are geared toward a little more abuse. We don't have an all-mountain HT 29er at this time but it is on our short-list for new products in the coming year.

    Hope that helps!

    Jeremy
    Airborne Dude.

  10. #10
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    I think the Goblin (or HobGoblin if you really want FS) is a great deal. Look at it this way: buy the Goblin, use the extra $$ you would have spent on the HobGoblin on a solid wheelset built for a clyde. Check the clydesdale section or wheels and tires for recommendations on wheelsets for clydes. For $500-600 you should be able to get a bulletproof wheelset that will last.

    As for your concern about possibly breaking a hardtail frame, I don't think you need to worry about that. A hit that would destroy your frame will probably also destroy your rear wheel, and would be equally bad on a FS bike.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyFlyer View Post
    I noticed in your other post that you mentioned jumping the bike on some smaller 2 foot jumps.

    Any XC bike is not really meant for that, especially when you throw the weight factor in there.

    The Goblin should do fine for you as long as you treat/ride it as an XC bike. At your weight you will burn thru components faster, like chain/gears/spokes/wheels. If you get the Goblin I would probably recommend looking at buying a more heavy-duty wheelset, like something designed for all-mountain use.

    If you want to jump or huck the bike, I might suggest looking at something like one of the new crop of all-mountain HT 29ers that are on the market, like the Trek Stache or the Diamondback Mason. Those bikes are geared toward a little more abuse. We don't have an all-mountain HT 29er at this time but it is on our short-list for new products in the coming year.

    Hope that helps!

    Jeremy

    Maybe I exaggerated a bit on my jump height. As I see you guys are based out of Dayton, OH and I am in Cincy, I will ask do you think the Hobgoblin is suited for trails in the area?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by WasteMindu View Post
    Maybe I exaggerated a bit on my jump height. As I see you guys are based out of Dayton, OH and I am in Cincy, I will ask do you think the Hobgoblin is suited for trails in the area?
    Yep, I've been riding a prototype HG for 8 months here locally and for the past several weeks have been riding on a production one. I'm about 50lbs less than you and have had no problems with it. As far as local trails go, I've ridden it at Eastfork, Ceasar Creek, Versailles, Brown County, Huston Woods, JB, and MOMBA.

    You should be fine, other than what I mentioned before about wearing thru components faster at your weight.

    Hope that helps!

    Jeremy
    Airborne Dude.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyFlyer View Post
    Yep, I've been riding a prototype HG for 8 months here locally and for the past several weeks have been riding on a production one. I'm about 50lbs less than you and have had no problems with it. As far as local trails go, I've ridden it at Eastfork, Ceasar Creek, Versailles, Brown County, Huston Woods, JB, and MOMBA.

    You should be fine, other than what I mentioned before about wearing thru components faster at your weight.

    Hope that helps!

    Jeremy
    Good to know and hopefully I can lose those 50lbs that I got on you with this sport.

    Now, I am torn on whether to get the Hobgoblin, The Stache (I like the concept) or building a Goblin from the ground up?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by WasteMindu View Post
    Good to know and hopefully I can lose those 50lbs that I got on you with this sport.

    Now, I am torn on whether to get the Hobgoblin, The Stache (I like the concept) or building a Goblin from the ground up?
    Good onya on losing those 50 in the future!

    I don't think you can go too wrong with any of those options. Even though I work for Airborne I'm a bike-guy first, and its no secret that I like the Stache. It's a great bike.

    If you are looking for a little more comfort and do longer rides (like Brown County), the HobGoblin is a champ. Brown County is where I went from a die-hard HT-lover to really loving the 4" of travel that the HG has.

    Building a Goblin, or any other bike, from the ground up is fun, and nice because you can put whatever you want on it. However it's often not the most cost-effective as it's almost always a better deal to buy a complete versus piecing a bike together from parts.However if you are the kind of guy that looks at every stock bike and sees a lot of parts you want to replace, then building one up from scratch is certainly the way. If you buy smart and take your time you can do a lot with $2K.

    Good luck in whatever you decide. Maybe I'll see you out on a local trail!

    Jeremy
    Airborne Dude.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyFlyer View Post
    Good onya on losing those 50 in the future!

    I don't think you can go too wrong with any of those options. Even though I work for Airborne I'm a bike-guy first, and its no secret that I like the Stache. It's a great bike.

    If you are looking for a little more comfort and do longer rides (like Brown County), the HobGoblin is a champ. Brown County is where I went from a die-hard HT-lover to really loving the 4" of travel that the HG has.

    Building a Goblin, or any other bike, from the ground up is fun, and nice because you can put whatever you want on it. However it's often not the most cost-effective as it's almost always a better deal to buy a complete versus piecing a bike together from parts.However if you are the kind of guy that looks at every stock bike and sees a lot of parts you want to replace, then building one up from scratch is certainly the way. If you buy smart and take your time you can do a lot with $2K.

    Good luck in whatever you decide. Maybe I'll see you out on a local trail!

    Jeremy
    I am leaning towards the HG because most of the parts on this bike match up well with the Stache. I also have been reading that FS is great for people with back problems and I have those. The only thing I wish Airborne had that Trek has, the lifetime adjustments and tunings. This is one thing I know that Airborne may not be able to provide since you guys are a warehouse. I may be wrong though, just repeating what I heard from the live chat on the website.

    Doea Airborne offer guarantees on their frames?

  16. #16
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    Just a tip... learn how to make those adjustments. Park Tool has tons of info on their website, and there are other places, too, where you can find tips on tuning. Even with your "free" tune ups from your Trek dealer, you'll be waiting while they take care of things. I find it much easier to just do it myself.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by dnlwthrn View Post
    Just a tip... learn how to make those adjustments. Park Tool has tons of info on their website, and there are other places, too, where you can find tips on tuning. Even with your "free" tune ups from your Trek dealer, you'll be waiting while they take care of things. I find it much easier to just do it myself.
    Good place for info, if I need to do some adjusting, thanks.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by WasteMindu View Post
    I am leaning towards the HG because most of the parts on this bike match up well with the Stache. I also have been reading that FS is great for people with back problems and I have those. The only thing I wish Airborne had that Trek has, the lifetime adjustments and tunings. This is one thing I know that Airborne may not be able to provide since you guys are a warehouse. I may be wrong though, just repeating what I heard from the live chat on the website.

    Doea Airborne offer guarantees on their frames?
    For full-suspension frames our frame warranty is 5 years on the frame and 1 year on the suspenion bits (bearings, bushings, bolts, etc).

    Soon we will have rebuild kits in stock for the HobGoblin (and other frames) so folks that like to keep their bikes long-term and wrench on them can rebuild them if things wear out.

    I don't know if "warehouse" is an appropriate term for us. We are a bike company just like any other. We do all of our own in-house design here in Dayton, Ohio along with all of our ride testing, graphics production, etc. Our warehouse that we store and ship the bikes from is located in Carson, CA (near Long Beach).

    Really what sets us apart from other bike companies like Trek, Specialized, etc is that we sell direct versus selling thru shops. For folks that can wrench on their own bikes or want to learn how to, buying a bike direct from us or any other online company is a good way to go. There are many folks who buy bikes from shops and never need to take them back for tune-ups and work.

    It's not a good fit for everyone, however. If you can't learn to work on your own bike, a shop is very important and something that should be considered when looking to purchase a bike.

    Hope that helps!

    Jeremy
    Airborne Dude.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyFlyer View Post
    For full-suspension frames our frame warranty is 5 years on the frame and 1 year on the suspenion bits (bearings, bushings, bolts, etc).

    Soon we will have rebuild kits in stock for the HobGoblin (and other frames) so folks that like to keep their bikes long-term and wrench on them can rebuild them if things wear out.

    I don't know if "warehouse" is an appropriate term for us. We are a bike company just like any other. We do all of our own in-house design here in Dayton, Ohio along with all of our ride testing, graphics production, etc. Our warehouse that we store and ship the bikes from is located in Carson, CA (near Long Beach).

    Really what sets us apart from other bike companies like Trek, Specialized, etc is that we sell direct versus selling thru shops. For folks that can wrench on their own bikes or want to learn how to, buying a bike direct from us or any other online company is a good way to go. There are many folks who buy bikes from shops and never need to take them back for tune-ups and work.

    It's not a good fit for everyone, however. If you can't learn to work on your own bike, a shop is very important and something that should be considered when looking to purchase a bike.

    Hope that helps!

    Jeremy
    Much appreciated for the insight in to Airborne. I was so much concern with the tune-up as I am with the warranty. I do appreciate all of your help and right now I have got the HG as my plan here in the tax season. I am always down for supporting companies in and around the Cincinnati area.

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