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  1. #1
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    What's wrong with my DUCs..

    And what do I need to put them right?

    My DUCs are in need of a little attention. Lock down not working & rebound unresponsive and turning the green knob makes no difference in performance.

    What do I need to do to put them straight??

    Many thanks in advance.

  2. #2
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    I am not a guru of the innards, but the first thing is checking the green knob is on right. Does it spin in circles instead of only the smaller normal range of motion?

    Last page of this Fork PDF lists a few ideas about lockdown.

  3. #3
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    Mine behaved the same way, sent it in last summer, came back working great. Now rebound doesn't work, but the lock out still does. I think it's a fairly high maintenance fork.

  4. #4
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    sounds like it needs some straightforward TLC - DIY using the tech PDFs on the maverick website or send it in somewhere.

    ragetty

  5. #5
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    I had a similar issue with my SC32 with the rebound not apparently working. Once I opened up the damper I found what looked like a tiny piece of an o-ring was blocking the rebound adjust port. I thoroughly cleaned all the damper parts, put it back together and it worked great. Complete instructions are available on the Maverick website as Ragetty mentioned, and working on the innards is not difficult at all. If it's not your bag, send it in for a re-build and I am sure it will come back working like new. And also keep in mind the adjustable range of rebound on the Maverick forks is small compared to other brands, it's hard to detect any change by just pushing on the fork - it's out on the trail where I notice the different adjustments.

    In response to the above comment about Maverick's being high maintance forks, IMHO I don't believe they require any more or less work than any other fork on the market. It is up to the rider how much or how little they take care of their equipment. I have owned a Rock Shox SID on a steel hardtail, a Fox Vanilla on my ML7, and now the Maverick SC32 and all require attention to keep them running smooth. I will say the Maverick is BY FAR the easiest to work on and tune.

  6. #6
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    I've just serviced my DUC using the PDFs on the maverick site. It's a bit daunting first time around but take your time, work logically and it's fairly easy. I bet a strip, clean and new lube will make all the difference. Try googling Simpson Cycle Service. He'll do a full service and rebuild for 80.

  7. #7
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    Easiest and most tunable forks to work on, but they have to be, due to the frequency of rebuilding thats required for them to work well.

  8. #8
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    I really don't know why people have that impression. They seem about the same as others I have used. I put more oil in once a year and that is about it. One real service with new seals since like 2006. That is the same for the people I know in real life that have them too.

  9. #9
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    I guess it depends on weight ( 200lbs), terrain, milage, and style of riding.
    All fluids should be replaced once a year and it is common to replace some O-rings.
    So you should open up the fork and clean, inspect O-rings and replace fluids at least once a year.
    See recomendations from Maverick

  10. #10
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    I am about 200# as well, though the other folks I know with them are lighter. My point is that my rock shox, marzochi, and fox products have required similar amounts of love to operate correctly. Perhaps it is just that with a regular fork a person can run it completely fubared and it still kind of works since it isn't inverted.

  11. #11
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    The Duc 32 is the best fork I have ridden. I am only suggesting that to be a maverick owner you should learn to rebuilt your shocks yourself so they will work to their optimum. Once you learn how to do it its a breeze. There are not many LBS that know how to rebuilt these properly. They just don't see enough them or if at all.
    My experience with the Duc and Sc includes having to clip the negative spring back onto its holder, replacing the top out bumper and oil changes/tunning. I will be checking soon to find the damaged Oring in the damper that is allowing the fork to creep up too fast while in lock out mode.
    It still rides great, so i will wait till next oil change.

  12. #12
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    Yeah it does sound like you had more than your fair share. I did have to replace the drop outs on mine when they cracked (it is an ancient model though). That was the worst thing I have had to deal with.

    I think it is nice to do all of them yourself if you have the time. I have rebuilt fox, and rock shox stuff too and it did not seem too terrible. The annoying thing about the rock shox was it had plastic threaded stuff. I have plastic threads they get ruined so easily. I got it used and it was cross threaded of course. Had to get new parts for it. My DUC had a cross threaded cable holder on the H part but I could just get a new bolt and tap the hole which made me smile

  13. #13
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    Damper nut won't go on...

    ...I think I stacked too many o-rings. I just got my IFP and AVR kit from Ethan and was stoked to have received it so quickly, great service and turnaround. When putting the damper assembly back into the fork upper, I realized I couldn't seat the damper nut and think I stacked two replacement o-rings in there without removing the old ones. What's my prognosis, do I have to undo the damper again and take off the piston? D'oh!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails What's wrong with my DUCs..-photo-2-.jpg  


  14. #14
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    If I am seeing an o-ring in your picture between the lock tube and the damper rod then that is not correct. The two o-rings on the lock tube are shown about half way down the lock tube in grooves in the PDF reference in post #2 above. Also look at the pictures on page 10.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by geweber View Post
    If I am seeing an o-ring in your picture between the lock tube and the damper rod then that is not correct. The two o-rings on the lock tube are shown about half way down the lock tube in grooves in the PDF reference in post #2 above. Also look at the pictures on page 10.
    Thanks, looks like I'm tearing it down again! Does anyone have any tricks to get the adjuster rod out of the damper shaft without using the 10mm shaft blocks in a bench vise (I have neither)?
    Last edited by nineracerxer; 03-21-2012 at 12:34 PM.

  16. #16
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    I have drilled a hole in a block of wood the size of the tube, then cut the block through the hole center. I compress these two halves around the tube in a vise. You could drill two bolt holes through the blocks and compress the two halves with bolts. I would assume you could use a soft aluminum block instead of wood.

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