Results 1 to 31 of 31
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    93

    quick fixes for front der. issues

    1) lube the the interface between the BB and the front D. ringmount. Seems obvious, but lot's of shops forget about it. Just spray some teflon lube in there and clean up the excess. No more Big Ring Creaking.

    2) Widen the the front D cage. Dunno how well this works with other front d's, (it's a dollar more at the front door if you want to get in); but the Shimano 10T Triple Ultegra on my 07 Durance benefitted by being forced to accept a 2.5 mm bushing from an old chain (the chain "bearing" casing... there's thousands of them on every old chain you have around). Use one of those as a "crush ring" around the bolt holding the lower portion of the d-cage together. It spreads it apart just enough to remove any chain tinking in high and low, and still gives perfect, quick, reliable shifts. Highly recommended mod: cheap and easy; if you have a Durance.

    3) Go to a medium cage rear D. Mavericks have the shortest chain growth in the high travel industry. You can easily switch from your long cage XT, XTR, or XO, X9 to the medium cage. This eliminates about 99% of sloppy chain slap and results in *way* more responsive shifting and better precision. I mated this change with a 11-34 to 12-34 XTR rear cassette and cannot describe the increase in precision and better overall shifting. The closer gear ratios work better for Central Texas (allowing you to actually use your outer triple in some cases), and the transitions on our "less extreme" terrain are more spot on (than say CA and CO where you're either in 1:1/1:2 or 3:10/3:11) better subtlety and more gear inches to explore: highly recommended.

    4) Mountain bikes with UST (or even tubes) having 6+ front and 5+ in the rear have ABSOLUTELY NO REASON to run less than 39 psi f/r for any limestone trail in central texas. Less pressure == less control. You're not gonna pinch flat, let your machine work for you.

    5) All right, I'll step up on the physician's soap box. Wear your sun protection every ride. Carcinoma is avoidable. Wear 35 SPF on every ride. Slather it like I do my Assos --> which is so much my wife calls it perverse and unhealthy. I like the way feels about mile 6.

    6) Not specifically a "Front D" issue: a) creaking saddle, b) creaking headset c) creaking front end
    a) lube your seat post and rails with some Phil Wood's
    b) use the "Hozan C-205 Japnanese" headset wrench. No other headset wrench gives you the low profile goodness of this Japanese steel wonderment. Love the $40.00 price tag for this tool, or expect to buy a new FSA Carbon Orbit Headset every year ($110) --- No. Chris King refuses to build us an integrated headset. I agree with their reasons, and Maverick should oblige (epsically considering CK went out of their way to PRODUCE a 24/7 compatible hub for this arcane DUC 32.)
    c) did you check your 24 mm hub insert into your quick release oversized dropouts? Grease those little curves and tell me what squeals of delight you hear tomorrow.

    Cheers.


    -- f9a


    Cheers,


    -- f9a
    Last edited by font9a; 01-01-2008 at 01:03 AM.

  2. #2
    TNC
    TNC is offline
    noMAD man
    Reputation: TNC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    12,059
    font, is that derailleur the newer one for the front derailleur on a flat bar roadbike setup? I've heard that derailleur is supposed to be the hot setup on a Maverick. Anyone here shed any light on that?

    I don't know about the higher pressure you have there. Our terrain around Abilene is similar to your area...a good many rocks and technical terrain. We all run tubeless out of our shop, but it seems like we get a little more annoying bounce and deflection when we start getting into the high 30's on air pressure. I agree that many folks seem to want to go too low on psi on many tubeless setups. I like 32-35 for the most part, but obviously there's some preference, tire size, and bike setup to consider.

    We're a Maverick dealer, along with Trek, Specialized, SC, and Haro. Most of my bikes have been SC and Specialized, but I've been riding the shop owner's ML8 for a bit, and I am quite impressed. We even turned it into a 69'er recently with excellent results. Right now it's in my shop at home, where I'm going to put my Van 36 on it to see how it responds to a bigger hit fork and 26'er wheel. I like this bike, as I've always been a long travel junkie.

    Thanks for your tips posted here. We have some great riding around Abilene. Our local trail just outside of town surprises everyone who has ridden it, and there's a ranch we ride on about 40 miles to the southwest that has 80 miles of trail that IMO is only second to Moab. If you're in the area, contact us at Biketown for a ride or information. I'm retired and only work part time there, so I have lots of time to ride...LOL!

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    2,137
    Font,
    What is the C-205 wrench used for on an FSA headset?

  4. #4
    TNC
    TNC is offline
    noMAD man
    Reputation: TNC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    12,059
    Good question, smoove. I'm putzing with that FSA headset at the moment on an ML8 on which I'm installing a Vanilla 36. Nothing really special about the headset, but I'm not seeing any application for a wrench.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Alpamayo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    322
    Quote Originally Posted by font9a
    1) lube the the interface between the BB and the front D. ringmount. Seems obvious, but lot's of shops forget about it. Just spray some teflon lube in there and clean up the excess. No more Big Ring Creaking.

    2) Widen the the front D cage. Dunno how well this works with other front d's, (it's a dollar more at the front door if you want to get in); but the Shimano 10T Triple Ultegra on my 07 Durance benefitted by being forced to accept a 2.5 mm bushing from an old chain (the chain "bearing" casing... there's thousands of them on every old chain you have around). Use one of those as a "crush ring" around the bolt holding the lower portion of the d-cage together. It spreads it apart just enough to remove any chain tinking in high and low, and still gives perfect, quick, reliable shifts. Highly recommended mod: cheap and easy; if you have a Durance.
    It's defnitely the good way to solve problem on Maverick front D. If I understand, you mean to put between the inner part of the fronD cage and the outer part a small spacer (old chain part). I'll try this solution, sure it's the good way

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    2,137
    Yeah. I successfully built up my 7/5 frame a week ago with an FSA carbon headset using nothing more than an allen wrench.

    That wrench looks like something I used on my StingRay BB when I was a kid...

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Ethan F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    351

    My 2 cents!

    1) We recommend the Shimano R773. QBP # FD7003. Shimano # IFDR773F52
    This has been the best shifting der we have used to date. If set-up well, using a piece of SIS cable inner Teflon guide tubing on the MonoLink noodle it works very well. To go a step further:
    Ever so slightly "tweak the middle of the outer cage INWARD. A slight thumb push in the middle is all it takes. This gives the chain a better push of the middle to little ring. It also helps by adjusting the der more out board thereby preventing chain drop off the inner ring. Then give the very front outside leading edge of the cage a tip to the INSIDE. This helps drop the chain crisply off the big rig. I have yet to try the new 10sp standard triple gear from Shimano. The R773 has similar cable pull to the mtb shifters.
    2) I fully agree with the shorter cage (meduim)
    The reason there may be more "chain drop" on the Mavericks is that the rear end is working!
    We also have the rear wheel moving and the B.B. slightly moving as well.
    All rear der pulley cages can be tightened up to greatly help this out. Shimano and Sram have different spring tension holes in the B-knuckle. I recommend the tightest setting.
    3) Make sure the drop out interface between the hub and axle are spot on clean, any thing in there will creak, make sure the QR is tight enough.
    4) Check the to make sure the steerer shaft is not sticking up to much (2mm max), this will prevent you from setting the headset properly and possibly creak.
    5) Check the crown bolts, we have been known to not fully tap the threads in the crown and the bolt will bottom out in the crown, not the head of the bolt on the crown, oops.
    6)Marine grease on all headset parts. FSA is the only headset that will last years for us?
    7)Sometimes noise will come from the back. Make sure to check the rear QR. These tend to loosen our bikes, because the rear is so stiff. Check it!

  8. #8
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    29,115
    Quote Originally Posted by Ethan F
    The reason there may be more "chain drop" on the Mavericks is that the rear end is working!
    Thank god the rear end of my bike isn't "working" so much.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  9. #9
    Gentleman Loser
    Reputation: Count Zero's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    427
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    Thank god the rear end of my bike isn't "working" so much.
    And thank you for being your predictable annoying self.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    93
    http://www.hozan.co.jp/cycle_e/catal...edal/C-205.htm

    My FSA Orbit CF has an aluminum lockring (that accepts the Hozan tool) between the Maverick stem and the headset topcap (the carbon "cone-shaped" FSA-logo'd piece). I don't know why it's there. I am looking at the FSA website and none of their headsets use a lockring... But there's one on my bike. And I have to use the Hozan lockring wrench to adjust my headset.

    I sourced my bike from WrenceScience and it was built like that when UPS delivered it to my doorstep last May.

    -- font9a

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    2,137
    font,
    I don't think that's a lockring. I have the same headset. There's a kind of split, flanged sleeve that looks like a lockring from above, but it's not threaded, so I can't see what effect a wrench would have. It takes up the slop between the upper bearing and the steerer tube. The only adjustment that I'm aware of for *any* threadless headset is thru a combination of the stem clamp and top cap.

    However, I is not a professional, so I could be stoopid.

    Cheers,
    P

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    152

    Steerer Shaft Nut?

    Quote Originally Posted by font9a
    between the Maverick stem and the headset topcap (the carbon "cone-shaped" FSA-logo'd piece)... And I have to use the Hozan lockring wrench to adjust my headset.
    Isn't that just the Steerer Shaft Nut? The fork service manual (http://www.maverickbike.com/cms_images/file_7.pdf) says to use a 4mm hex to turn it (steerer shaft bolt has to be loosened first). See fig 8 on p5. For minor adjustments the 4mm seems to work fine.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    2,137
    Ah, so. You running a DUC fork, font?

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    152

    Yep

    Quote Originally Posted by SmooveP
    Ah, so. You running a DUC fork, font?
    You talkin to me? Yeah, I've got a DUC and I've adjusted my headset at that nut with a 4mm wrench...

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    2,137
    ssorgs,
    No, I was talkin to font9a, but that's OK.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Ethan F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    351

    Headset...

    Looks like you guys are working it out! As ssorgs mentioned check out the fork manual on the Mav web site. What you are referring to is the Steerer shaft nut. This basically acts as as the top cap to a standard fork/headset set-up. The steerer shaft nut creates preload on the bearings. Then the top crown, once seat firmly on top of the steerer shaft nut will prevent it from loosening. You can use the Hozan tool or a 4mm Allen wrench or even a end of a pen to adjust the nut. But, you really need to loosen the stem bolt and crown bolts and reset the crown if you readjust the headset. This will keep it from loosening up down the road. The FSA headsets have been bullet proof for us, even with excessive pressure (preload).

    ssorgs, I would never call any body "fat"! Have you seen "The Biggest Loser" lately. Holly cow, thats fat! 185lbs, jezzz, thats svelte these days. Can I come out of the "shadows" now! I'll do my best to keep up with all you guys here and get good information out there. But I've a got a few things around the shop to deal with too! So I might be a bit late to respond. But please feel free to contact my e-mail address if any one needs immediate help. Spread the good Maverick word

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ragetty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    582
    @ EthanF

    is there any reaon why the steerer shaft nut (given the proper material) can't be longer?

    ragetty

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Ethan F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    351

    Steerer shaft

    We could make it longer but with out a taller crown to use it, there is no need. The total head stack will determine the size crown. But the tall crown will only accommodate up to 172mm total stack and the current steerer shaft will fit up to this.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ragetty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    582
    ah, but there is a need - for me anyway ...

    i want to put more space (i.e. spacers, currently the nut is only long enough for about 3 or 4mm) between the upper race and the upper crown so i can raise my stem and handle bar - that is, i have about 12mm to go before the crown gets to the top of the Duc32 ...

    (yes, i've seen the other solution with the spacer, but i'm curious ... )

    the Duc32 is on a Giant Reign '05 (small), you can see what i mean on this pic:




    ragetty

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Ethan F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    351

    Crown explination

    The steerer shaft nut can only accommodate about 3-5mm of spacer including the top race and compression ring. (FYI, it is extremely important that the steerer nut fully captures the compression ring of the headset, this would be the full C.K. top cap for folks using King) In your case the only way to raise the bar is to use the spacers made by Passion Trail Cycles in Belmont Ca for the stem or a higher rise bar. The crown and steerer are to fit the head tube size , not to determine bar height. The reason there is not different length steerer NUTS, is that the leverage on the headset, head tube and especially the steerer shaft, would dramatically increase if you could just add spacers. You would be asking the system to take tremendous loads it is not designed for. At the moment the steerer shaft has no fore- aft load on it at all. This is because the crown is so close to the headset and all the load goes thru the crown to the top cap, bearings... If you leave the bearings where are and raise the crown, load will now be transmitted thru the steerer shaft. Since we do not use a standard steerer tube, which would have added at least 3/4lb and not be a Maverick, the steerer cannot handle this type of load. Hope this helps. I've seen some pretty crazy owner set-ups that scare the hell out me, folks NEED to look at the directions!

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ragetty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    582
    yeah, i thought it might be something to do with loads if the steerer shaft nut were longer.

    my "most sensible" option is to swap out the handle bar and stem for 25.4mm - the stem is raked higher and will probably get me most of what i need.

    although i do rather like the look of the OS bar ...

    thx anyway, ragetty

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Ethan F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    351
    Looks like your at the 95mm position on the stem? The 25.4 90mm stem will get it up about 10-12mm more. And save about 80 grams too!

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation: ragetty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    582
    this is now off topic, sorry everyone ...

    ragetty

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    86

    Monolink FD help

    I have heard of some people using an avid rollamajig to help the front shifting on their Maverick but have not seen any pics. Can anyone speak to that?

    Anyone out there try this? I happen to have an extra Al Monolink as I put a Mg on in my SS ML7. Just a disclaimer of sorts. I was having front shifting issues on my ML7.5. The thing just would not move when I pulled the cable! Now, I know that Maverick says that it will be more difficult when combining the FD 773 (10sp braze on flat bar) with the Dual Control levers ( I am using the M960's). That said, it seemed that I could not make it easier. New cable, housing, lube the pivots on the FD, etc. So I got an idea when working on my old steel hardtail. They used a pulley wheel on the seat tube just above the bottom bracket to make a bottom pull out of a top pull.

    Looking at the Monolink I decided that was the only place I could reduce the drag in the system. So I did some cutting, grinding, and drilling to install a problem solvers' travel agent onto a monolink. I was having trouble loading pics but you can email me for them. This is still in process but it seems to have helped.

    Any others out there?

  25. #25
    Gentleman Loser
    Reputation: Count Zero's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    427
    The older Maverick D-mount had a downward-oriented cable stop into which you could rig a Rollamajig, bypassing the Monolink's cable guide. I have a Durance setup this way, and it shifts quite well.

    On the other hand, the new D-mount omits the cable stop, forcing one to use the Monolink cable guide and stop. I don't think there's room in this setup to run a Rollamajig. Anyway, my ML8 is setup with the new D-mount, and sadly it does not shift with as much authority as the Durance. It definitely gets more sticky in muddy conditions.

  26. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    2,137
    I have an '05 ML7/5 with R773, and mine shifts as good as any of my other bikes. I have (or had) a secret stash of Gore Ride-On cables. Don't know what I'll do when it's time to replace the cable, though.
    Probably suffer like you guys.

  27. #27
    Gentleman Loser
    Reputation: Count Zero's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    427

    Gore is back

    I think you've confirmed my hope that a sealed Gore Ride-On cable would operate very well in a Monolink cable guide.

    So, the good news is that Gore is back in the bike business!

    Check out their new site:
    http://www.rideoncables.com/

    I just checked Speedgoat.com, and it appears that they are available now at about $65 per set.

  28. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    2,137
    Holy crap. I had no idea. And my friend is the webmaster at Speedgoat. My last set I found somewhere on the web about 3 years ago. The packaging is printed in German. Maybe I should start hoarding them again, just in case.

    But yeah, they do work great. Just make sure the inner cable liner goes through the noodle on the monolink, of course. I should mention that I'm running X.0 twist shifters, so I can't vouch for how much they'd help on those other systems.

    Cheers

  29. #29
    Gentleman Loser
    Reputation: Count Zero's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    427

    08 derailleur mounts

    Having just built up my 08 durance (sorry no photos yet, my danged camera's broken for good), and I want to note here that the D-mount has changed in that a relieved section has been added to accomodate Shimano derailleur cages at the inboard extreme.

    I have not yet ridden my new bike, but I can only imagine that this really helps with shifting to and from the granny ring.

    Ethan, perhaps you can comment on availability of these new D-mounts for owners of past-generation bikes?

    - Tommy O

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Ethan F's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    351

    Shifting

    Are you using a piece of liner on the noodle and a Shimano rubber boot over that to keep dirt out?

  31. #31
    Fortes Fortuna Iuvat
    Reputation: Datalogger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,214
    Wow, there is some great reading in this thread!
    Maverick Durance Ano-DUC32/C KING/XTR
    Mav ML8 Ano-DUC32/X0
    Mav ML8-DUC32/I9/XTR
    09 Spec. Demo-Totem-Ti DHX
    Norco Team DH

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

mtbr.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.