Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: fizzywater's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    188

    Opinions about Durance vs Mojo

    I posted this question originally in the Ibis forum, but decided to post here as well in case other Maverick users want to chime in and share their opinion/experiences......

    Sorry for hijacking the thread Count Zero, but I saw on the Maverick forum that you seem to be an avid Maverick proponent and was curious how you rate the Mojo against the Durance. I demoed a Durance and ML8 very recently and while I liked both very very much, I am more leaning towards the Durance as the ML8 seems to be too much bike for me at this stage (still on a steel HT; Bay Area trails, occasional trip to Downieville or Tahoe). I demoed a bunch of other bikes (i.e. Giant Trance X, Yeti 575, Mojo), but the Durance is hands down my top contender. It just seems to be doing everything right. Very efficient riding, pedals great, no annoying bobbing or squatting (at least at a level where it did not bother me whatsoever), though I am still not entirely sure that I truly understand the difference between these terms. Absolutely awesome when climbing in the saddle or when hammering out off the saddle and felt very secure/stable going down fast. It's weird, going down fast rocky singletracks it did not necessarily feel as plush as some of the other bikes I tried, but somehow it felt like I was feeling/getting less feedback/activity from the suspension (yes, slightly stiffer ride, but kind of better isolating me from what was going on beneath me) in the end making it feel more stable going down at faster speeds . It doesn's seem to make sense, but that's how it felt or maybe it's a combination of front and rear suspension being dialed in/synchronized better than other vendors (not sure). Most importantly, geometry felt great to me.

    I demoed a Mojo a few months ago and was not too impressed by the rear suspension, but with all the hype surrounding it, I have the suspicion it was not set up too well for my weight (too soft), as it was bobbing quite heavily and felt almost too active going downhill fast (basically running through its travel too quickly), though I have to admit it never bottomed out even though I expected it with all the wallowing going on. That being said, I did like the geometry of the bike and I should probably demo it again making sure it's set up right.

    Since you have both bikes (obviously you like them both), what pros and cons do you see between the two and which one would you ultimately choose if you could keep only one of them?

  2. #2
    Gentleman Loser
    Reputation: Count Zero's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    427

    For me, the Durance is the choice

    Hi Fizzy.

    First, I will say that both the Durance and the Mojo are terrific bikes, and that a choice between the two comes down to rider preference.

    My personal choice between the two is the Durance. As you said, it just does everything right.

    I have my Mojo and my Durance setup almost the same, notably both with the DUC32, similar wheels, and a 2.4 MotoRaptor/2.1 Nevegal tire combo.

    While I give the advantage to the Mojo in pedaling over long distance, for me the Durance is better in all other areas. The Mojo is wonderful, but to me the Maverick is inspiring.

    So, if I were to sum up for the two bikes:

    Mojo Pros:
    Great pedaler, DW Link perhaps the best currently available.
    Predictable handler.
    Ever so pretty.

    Mojo Cons:
    Bendy rear triangle, IMHO.
    Stock, "high compression tune" RP23 was absolutely terrible.
    Weird frame under-sizing, also IMHO.

    Durance Pros:
    Light yet unusually stiff.
    Great handling in all circumstances.
    Confidence inspiring.

    Durance Cons:
    Perhaps requires more preventive maintenance than what consumers expect.
    Some people will automatically think you're a poser.

    I've ridden both bikes, back to back on the same day alternating with friends, and on consecutive days by myself. I definitely ride the Mojo faster on pedally sections, but my terminal speeds are faster on the Durance and I always wish for the Maverick in the heavy stuff.

    Now, I have to disclose that I have been riding Maverick bikes since 2001 and I consider several of the people at Maverick my friends. So, I have a favorable bias towards the people and their machines.

    Again, it comes to personal preference but the Maverick Durance is my pick.

    Tommy

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    350
    I will chip in as I owned a Mojo and a 7.5 for a while....I sold the Mojo!
    Great bike but the Maverick has a more inspiring ride, its more individual and I like its character. In a way the Mojo is a better bike, well designed, does all the right things but after a while I felt non plussed....something was missing. Perhaps it was the 'carbon' thing.
    i think you nailed it when you said
    "It's weird, going down fast rocky singletracks it did not necessarily feel as plush as some of the other bikes I tried, but somehow it felt like I was feeling/getting less feedback/activity from the suspension (yes, slightly stiffer ride, but kind of better isolating me from what was going on beneath me) in the end making it feel more stable going down at faster speeds . It doesn's seem to make sense, but that's how it felt"

  4. #4
    do-a-wheelie
    Guest
    Both ride very well, but in the end I think the added stiffness of the Maverick over all other trail bikes (as noted above in comparision to the Mojo, but the same can be said for the 575 and others in the light weight category), as well as the slight advantage in suspension (more rearward travel gives more pedaling power and better descending/climbing ability) gives the nod to the Durance. The Mojo's excellent DW link place it above all other bikes except for maybe the Giant Maestro and Santa Cruz VPP which are equals, but when it comes to the best of the best in terms of sus travel--the Mav wins. The carbon on the Mojo does give it a plush ride and nice looks though. Either one and I'd be smiles on the trail and feel good about my choice, however for now I say Durance has no equals.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: fizzywater's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    188

    More preventive maintenance...?

    Quote Originally Posted by Count Zero
    Durance Cons:
    Perhaps requires more preventive maintenance than what consumers expect.
    Hi Count Zero,
    First off, thanks for your detailed feedback (and all others who chimed in). Was just curious....could you elaborate a little more about the increased preventive maintenance aspect? Are we talking major shock and fork overhaul every few months or more simple, quick stuff?

  6. #6
    Gentleman Loser
    Reputation: Count Zero's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    427
    Quote Originally Posted by fizzywater
    Hi Count Zero,
    First off, thanks for your detailed feedback (and all others who chimed in). Was just curious....could you elaborate a little more about the increased preventive maintenance aspect? Are we talking major shock and fork overhaul every few months or more simple, quick stuff?
    Well, to be honest, I find it best to overhaul my forks' damper and spring cartridges about once every couple of months. That's not to say I replace any parts, but I do clean them out and replace all of the fork fluids.

    In contrast, I think that most people prefer never to overhaul their forks, and just willingly suffer steady degradations in performance until time of replacement.

    I would have preferred to overhaul my RockShox and Fox forks on about the same schedule, but they were uncategorically more difficult to work on and so I let them go longer between disassemblies.

    As for the rear shock, I'll clean and lubricate the shock bodies about once every six months, more often if the season has been particularly wet. As for the damper cartridges, I generally leave them alone unless I have a problem. I will check pressure on their floating pistons any time I have the dampers out for cleaning, though.

    One thing I will say is that the design of and quality control on Maverick's bikes have never been better than they are now. All their stuff has evolved to a point at which the unintended and unexpected weaknesses have been corrected.

    Tommy

  7. #7
    JTP
    JTP is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    67

    agree...

    Yes, he definetly nailed it when he said:

    "It's weird, going down fast rocky singletracks it did not necessarily feel as plush as some of the other bikes I tried, but somehow it felt like I was feeling/getting less feedback/activity from the suspension (yes, slightly stiffer ride, but kind of better isolating me from what was going on beneath me) in the end making it feel more stable going down at faster speeds . It doesn's seem to make sense, but that's how it felt"

    I just built up an 08 Durance. Had been riding a 05 ML8 for last 2 1/2 years. I love the ML8, but the Durance is better for me. ML8 was a medium. the durance is a size large and that may have something to do with it. i am just about 5'11". 180#, average proportions, and the large durance fits me really good. I was always messing with my position on the ML8 but i am instantly comfortable on the durance. I am running 135 psi in the rear (plush) and I do not feel squat or bob. been running the same duc32 since 2005 on various frames. The maintance thing is no big deal. to me it is a positive. you can get inside the fork yourself and set it up just the way you like. I have mine set up 90 PSI in the air side, 12 ml 10 wt oil in the bottom of the air spring. on the damper side i have 10wt oil 63 mm from the top, light shim stack, piston flat side up, 80psi. i run the rebound 2 clicks in from full fast. the fork absolutely domintates.

    A very balanced bike fun in aggressive XC trail riding situtations.
    Last edited by JTP; 04-12-2008 at 08:16 PM.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    93

    Maverick Tech Support & Durance Maintenance

    Maverick Tech Support is the best I've ever encountered. When I ran into a little trouble the first time I took my DUC32 apart* and the damper rod bolt head sheared off I overnighted it to Maverick, Ethan Franklin personally gave it a "factory tune" (for free) and overnighted it back to me. It was off my bike about 24 hrs total, and Maverick not only replaced the broken bolt, but factory tuned it in record time. For free. And with constant communication through email as to status, tips, etc.

    * Here's the pertinent part about maintenance: No other bike could be as easy to work on. After I did the first routine 6-12 month maint on the rear strut (the manual says it should take less than an hour; they should have said less than 10 minutes) and aside from the mishap with the DUC (that part should take you 45 minutes) my Durance rides better than it did when it was new. So, take 55 minutes to completely overhaul your front and rear suspension + the normal time you take to clean and lube your link... No other full suspension bike could be faster/easier to work on by the @home mechanic.

    So 2 points:
    1) Maverick has amazing technical support. The best I've ever encountered.
    2) The Durance is amazingly easy to work on and keep in tip-top condition.

    -- font9a

Members who have read this thread: 1

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

mtbr.com and the ConsumerReview Network are business units of Invenda Corporation

(C) Copyright 1996-2018. All Rights Reserved.