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  1. #1
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    maverick duc 23 home service

    hi ive had a pair of duc 32's for a while now, ive had them serviced in the past at a shop but i read there easy to do yourself? is it really thats easy? could some one give me some ideas please on what i need to do? thanks chris

  2. #2
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    Hi Chris, tell use what you know about them and what tools you have.

    It is easier to do something once you have done it. That is why most of us say it is easy to work on these forks. It is easy to change the bath oil which is the main periodic service you would need to do. Working on the other features is easier than most other forks. Changing the shim stack and weight of oil is not difficult.

    It is always best to know how stuff works before you work on it. That is a neat web site, HowStuffWorks "Learn how Everything Works!" .

    If you haven't done it yet get all the manuals on the DUC at MAVERICK - Manual PDFs .

    Search this forum for data on the Maverick DUC . You can click on a poster's name and get more posts by that person. Pictures help and there are quite a few pictures here.

    Check out Ethan Franklin. He has posts on this site and you can get Maverick parts from him and advice. He is very helpful.

    Jerry

  3. #3
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    Thankyou for your help, I've got quite a few tools, I real could do with changing the oil it hasn't been changed for quite a while! What's the best viscosity to use?

  4. #4
    Schipperkes are cool.
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    Oil weight in the damper varys due to riding style.
    Oil for the uppers/Stanchions is 10ccs 5w.
    Oil in the air side is 10cc Fox Float Fluid/Redrum in bottom of chamber & 2-3ccs top of piston.
    Slick honey up the dust seals
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee
    Better suited to non-aggressive 125# gals named Russell.

  5. #5
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    To change the bath oil only you would need just a phillips screwdriver and a 10 mm socket wrench.

    How I do it.

    1. I put the bike in a bike stand and remove the front wheel.

    2. I stand in front of the bike and hold the two tabs of the lockout knob in my left hand while unscrewing the small phillips screw. I keep the screw driver on the screw while I lift the knob off to keep from losing this small screw. I do the reverse when putting it back on. Make sure not to pinch the thin o-ring when putting this knob back on. Also make sure the rebound knob engages with the rebound rod properly before tightening the screw. Turn the rebound knob counterclockwise to get proper engagement.

    2. Remove the damper rod bolt using a 10 mm socket.

    2. Let the air out of the air coil. Remove the schrader valve with a 10 mm socket. Make sure the air spring rod stays in the top cap. Otherwise the rod will move sideways a little and when you screw the schrader valve out you can damage the small o-ring on the schrader valve. Been there done that. Just try to make sure this schrader valve stays centered when you unscrew it.

    3. Rotate the bike so the fork legs are horizontal. Then the oil will not drain out when you remove the stanchions. You may have to remove the front brake to get the air coil side out. Now you can remove the stanchions by pulling them out. I have a paper towel in one hand to wipe the oil off assuming you have some bath oil remaining. Notice if the bottom out bumpers come out with the stanchions. Otherwise look in the fork housing for them and remove them. I put a zip lock bag on each leg and rotate the bike back to drain the oil and get the bottom bumpers out.

    4. Check the bottom out bumpers for being split. I always have some spares since I find these split pretty easy if you bottom out hard.

    5. If you have fine grit in the old oil then you might want to clean the fork housing out.

    6. Put 10 cc of bath oil in each side.

    7. Put the bottom out bumper on each rod. Rub a little bath oil on the seals or stanchion where it first contacts the seals. If you have Slick Honey you can put that on the inside of the seals as Banks suggested. Then put the stanchions back in.

    8. Get the rods all the way into the top caps. This keeps the rod centered when you screw the schrader valve with the o-ring into the rod. Don't over torque these. They can break.

    9. Put the knobs back on with the precautions I stated in step 2.

    I have done this by laying the bike on the floor. By twisting the seat side ways and positioning the pedals you can get the fork legs horizontal so the oil doesn't drip out.

    I have used 5-30 Mobil 1 oil for the bath oil when I didn't have anything better around. Some oil is better than no oil. I normally use a mixture of Fox Float oil and 5 weight suspension oil.

  6. #6
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    Thankyou for your help I shall be trying this very soon! Does the oil in the damper cartridge ever need changing?

  7. #7
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    Never got the rebound dial
    to realy work on that fork
    www,chernibikes.com

    HAND CRAFTED RIDING MACHINES @ Face Book
    Chernichovsky Bicycle Labs

  8. #8
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    The one on mine doesn't seem to do any thing either, the forks just feel like a pogo stick! Up and down with no real damping

  9. #9
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    Think of the rebound dial as a fine trim control. The two turns do open and close a small port in the oil damper. The quarter turn of the lock out knob opens and closes a larger port in the oil damper. Changing the oil viscosity will affect the rebound. You can turn the lock out knob a little to the right and you will notice less rebound. To verify that the rebound dial is actually turning the rebound rod turn the lock out knob all the way to the right, compress the fork, now adjust the rebound dial and you should notice some effect of the rebound.

    Chris, I don't think the oil in the damper has to be changed. I wouldn't think it would break down or the viscosity change. I would recommend getting an internal floating piston (IFP) from Ethan to keep the oil separate from the air in the oil damper. Otherwise the air mixes with the oil and the effective viscosity changes.

    Jerry

  10. #10
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    I ride an SC32 which uses the same damper system, and had no rebound control either. I opened up the damper to clean it and change the oil and found an o-ring inside the rod itself had been damaged and was blocking the port. To get to that piece you do have to pretty much dismantle the rod and piston assembly, very easy to do with the Maverick manuals (I made 10mm vice blocks out of wood, by the way). Once I replaced that and added new oil (5wt) it all worked fine. The rebound range is narrow, unlike a Fox or other fork.

    I recently sent my fork to Ethan to install an IFP and do a custom tune and I have to say the difference is night and day. The IFP has almost entirely eliminated the fork's brake dive, and the performance is now very consistent over all terrain. Ethan also totally dialed in the fork based on my riding style and how I wanted the fork to behave. Contact him at mavericksuspension@gmail.com, you won't regret it a second.

  11. #11
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    I don't think you need much damping of the rebound on the front because of the negative spring. The force of this spring increases lineraly at the end of the fork extension (top out). I took the negative spring out one time and then I had top out knocking if I didn't dial in more rebound damping with the lock out knob. I did put in a much lighter negative spring. Now I use all the travel of the fork when I ride. When I have the air coil pressure at the level I like to ride with I like the negeative spring fully compressed (fork fully extended) with no weight on the bike. I don't seemed to be topping out and the rebound is dampened enough so I don't feel like it is kicking back after a quick compression but is fast enough to be ready for the next hit.

    If you have a 6 inch travel fork shouldn't it travel the full stroke on most rides? I feel if I don't bottom out or top out every once in a while I don't have it set up correctly.

  12. #12
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    Hi all I've just been on a ride and whilst putting my bike back in the car noticed the right hand fork leg wiper seal half way down the leg! Does any one know if I will have lost any oil or is it ok to just slide it back in to place?

  13. #13
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    If the wiper seal is completely out of the upper tube then you have lost your oil bath for sure. Lucky it wasn't the left side which would cover your brake caliper and ruin your pads and rotor! If your seals are black, you will want to replace them with the improved blue seals, I've seen them on eBay and of course Ethan should be able to set you up. The seal popping out can be caused by air pressure build up in the upper leg, there are some posts in this forum dealing with this issue. It is correctable, and there are even after-market seal heads available from Suspension Experts which will lock your wiper seals in place.

    I recommend you send your fork to Ethan for a once over, tune, and IFP installation. I have had three people ride my bike after he did my tune and all three were blown away by the fork's performance.

  14. #14
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    Sounds like you may not have had any bath oil left. There should have been some oil that came out when the seal came loose and slid down. You could turn the bike upside down and put some light oil in the fork housing where the seal came off. Flush it around and then drain it back out to see how dirty it is. Do this a couple of times until it looks like you have fairly clean oil. Then put 10 cc of bath oil in the fork. Clean the seal and fork housing where the seal goes and then push the seal back in place. It may hold or not.

    You may not have any bath oil in the other leg either. This bath oil lubricates between the stanchion and the bushing. It also lubricates the wiper seal. The action between the seal and the stanchion may have been sticky and this along with the pressure in the fork housing when it compresses may have caused the seal to come off.

    Did you notice any oil on the stanchion. You should get a dust ring on the stanchion where the seal wipes a little oil. If the bath oil is gone then you wouldn't get this and the stanchions and bushing would not be lubricated very good.

    Take the stanchions out and check things out. It is really not that difficult. Like g_henrys said, sending it off to Ethan for a completes service woiuld let you know how the fork should function.

  15. #15
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    I live in the england, I only know of two places that service maverick! I'm going to have a strip down and inspection at weekend, many thanks for all your advice and tips

  16. #16
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    chrislewis, whereabouts are you?

    If you're anywhere near me (Worcester) you're welcome to pop round and I'll take a look at your fork.

    Sounds to me though if its popped its seal it's overdue a proper service...

  17. #17
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    Thanks markyboy I'm in Lancashire could be quite a trek ha! I'm surprised no one has put a video on YouTube on how to strip snd service these forks??

  18. #18
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    SC32 Concern

    I just got a 2006 ML7 w/ the SC32 suspension.
    My question is regards to the fork suspension.

    I want to know if it is normal that one arm of the fork (the one with the rebound adjustment on top of it) has very little resistance when compressed individually? Is there something wrong with it?


    thanks

  19. #19
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    There should be some resistance depending of the air pressure in the damper. Try turning the rebound knob all the way clockwise and see if there is a difference. Try it with the lockout on as well. You might have to pull out the lower leg and pressurize the damper.

  20. #20
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    As I turn the rebound knob resistance increases. I also got an advice from Ethan and I am relieved by what he said. Thanks Ethan!

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