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  1. #1
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  2. #2
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    dang - i will have to repaint the bike ...

  3. #3
    Schipperkes are cool.
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    Paul Turner is on the payroll with Xfusion
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee
    Better suited to non-aggressive 125# gals named Russell.

  4. #4
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    20mm thru axle only ... stiffness ???
    Maverick ML7.2 / SC32
    Maverick ML7.5
    Maverick Durance / Duc32
    Maverick ML8 / BOS Devile

    French Maverick Breeder

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alpamayo View Post
    20mm thru axle only ... stiffness ???
    [edit] ...

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alpamayo View Post
    20mm thru axle only ... stiffness ???
    ''The secret to the whole USD system comes down to our patented Gold-E-Lock system,'' X-Fusion's John Hauer explains. ''Trilateral keyways located along each side of the stanchion and upper tubes restricts any twisting and gives you the most stout and consistent stroke over every impact.''
    ''the Revel, with its 34mm stanchion tubes, is far more stout than any 35mm or 36mm chassis on the market.''

    I guess this is to make them stiffer and more rigid torsionally.

    I have always found for my type of ridding/trails the duc and sc have always felt stiffer and better steering then any of the 130-150 mm 32 stanchions forks that I tried.

  7. #7
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    “All high end motorcycles use USD forks,, only the low end models use traditional style suspension forks”- Paul Turner (Rockshox Founder and REVEL Designer)

    MSRP: $1,776 USD

    X-Fusion's Radical Revel HLR - Interbike 2013 - Pinkbike

  8. #8
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    Why like the SC32 instead of DUC though? I guess patent still on the H brace it is a real shame though.

  9. #9
    Elitest thrill junkie
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    Quote Originally Posted by voob View Post
    “All high end motorcycles use USD forks,, only the low end models use traditional style suspension forks”- Paul Turner (Rockshox Founder and REVEL Designer)

    MSRP: $1,776 USD

    X-Fusion's Radical Revel HLR - Interbike 2013 - Pinkbike
    It's idiot comments like that which keep him from being taken seriously.

    The reason high end motorcycles are USD is completely different.

    First of all, on off-road bikes, they have no other way to get enough bushing overlap for it to work. With 13" of travel and more, the lowers get extended a ridiculous amount, increasing weight needlessly, given all the "empty" space between the crowns.

    Secondly, motorcycle forks rely on huge reinforced crowns, unlike mountain bikes. This is so dramatic that there is actually no "steerer" on most of them. Where the steerer would be there's simply a small diameter tube/bolt type device to preload the bearings that sit on the crowns. The second I see mountain bikes designed without steerers, I'll believe this one, in fact, Avalanche did that with their biggest DH fork, the MTN-8, but it was also something crazy like 12lbs. Mountain bikes on the other hand rely on their steerers, in fact more now than ever since we have 160mm 29er forks (way long axle to crown, so it needs a big 1.5 steerer to resist flex).

    Thirdly, off-road forks are designed like that because they see the biggest forces from big jumps/doubles. Casing a double on a motorcycle is a huge deal, so having that ultimate strength from two crowns and bigger uppers is a good idea, but mountain bikes don't spend their time doing the same thing, even on a smaller scale, unless we are talking about only downhill.

    Fourth, even right-side-up motorcycle forks don't have brake arches, meaning they aren't losing much, if any, stiffness by going to an inverted design, the fork legs would be able to move independently in both cases, but they generally do not due to the crowns mentioned above.

    Lastly, in addition the massive crowns, ratio of the headtube length to the lowers and travel, the high end road motorcycles usually have very little travel comparatively, so it would be like having a 40mm stanchioned inverted fork with 2" of travel on a mountain bike, so again, not really the same thing.

    The only advantage with an inverted fork for mountain biking, as long as DH forks don't go past 8" of travel, is the seal lubrication, but modern forks have overcome this and it's not much of an issue, although fox has been trying for years to seal their forks, resorting to gimmick coatings, while other manufacturers figured out how to seal forks years ago. The other "advantages" are not quantifiable. Stiffer for-aft? Well yes, but if you make the stanchions bigger on a normal fork, like 35 or 40mm, it's not going to matter. Less unsprung weight? Not really, stachions, dropouts, axles, bottom oil, the damper rod and piston, brake adaptor, brake caliper, brake rotor, brake line, hub, spokes, nipples, rim, rip tape, tire and sealant are not weightless, in fact cast magnesium or aluminum lowers are extremely lightweight, so it doesn't really save any weight, may even be heavier.

    This X-fusion is not very interesting to me. I can't understand paying that much for something that weighs half a pound more than a pike with the much more travel (29er version) and bigger stanchions. Would it be as stiff? Maybe, but it's already starting off 13% heavier. What if that extra weight was used to beef up a pike even more? Now, if this fork weighed a POUND less than the pike, with the same performance and stiffness, then you might have something and a reason to spend all that money.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem View Post
    It's idiot comments like that which keep him from being taken seriously.

    The reason high end motorcycles are USD is completely different.

    First of all, on off-road bikes, they have no other way to get enough bushing overlap for it to work. With 13" of travel and more, the lowers get extended a ridiculous amount, increasing weight needlessly, given all the "empty" space between the crowns.

    Secondly, motorcycle forks rely on huge reinforced crowns, unlike mountain bikes. This is so dramatic that there is actually no "steerer" on most of them. Where the steerer would be there's simply a small diameter tube/bolt type device to preload the bearings that sit on the crowns. The second I see mountain bikes designed without steerers, I'll believe this one, in fact, Avalanche did that with their biggest DH fork, the MTN-8, but it was also something crazy like 12lbs. Mountain bikes on the other hand rely on their steerers, in fact more now than ever since we have 160mm 29er forks (way long axle to crown, so it needs a big 1.5 steerer to resist flex).

    Thirdly, off-road forks are designed like that because they see the biggest forces from big jumps/doubles. Casing a double on a motorcycle is a huge deal, so having that ultimate strength from two crowns and bigger uppers is a good idea, but mountain bikes don't spend their time doing the same thing, even on a smaller scale, unless we are talking about only downhill.

    Fourth, even right-side-up motorcycle forks don't have brake arches, meaning they aren't losing much, if any, stiffness by going to an inverted design, the fork legs would be able to move independently in both cases, but they generally do not due to the crowns mentioned above.

    Lastly, in addition the massive crowns, ratio of the headtube length to the lowers and travel, the high end road motorcycles usually have very little travel comparatively, so it would be like having a 40mm stanchioned inverted fork with 2" of travel on a mountain bike, so again, not really the same thing.

    The only advantage with an inverted fork for mountain biking, as long as DH forks don't go past 8" of travel, is the seal lubrication, but modern forks have overcome this and it's not much of an issue, although fox has been trying for years to seal their forks, resorting to gimmick coatings, while other manufacturers figured out how to seal forks years ago. The other "advantages" are not quantifiable. Stiffer for-aft? Well yes, but if you make the stanchions bigger on a normal fork, like 35 or 40mm, it's not going to matter. Less unsprung weight? Not really, stachions, dropouts, axles, bottom oil, the damper rod and piston, brake adaptor, brake caliper, brake rotor, brake line, hub, spokes, nipples, rim, rip tape, tire and sealant are not weightless, in fact cast magnesium or aluminum lowers are extremely lightweight, so it doesn't really save any weight, may even be heavier.

    This X-fusion is not very interesting to me. I can't understand paying that much for something that weighs half a pound more than a pike with the much more travel (29er version) and bigger stanchions. Would it be as stiff? Maybe, but it's already starting off 13% heavier. What if that extra weight was used to beef up a pike even more? Now, if this fork weighed a POUND less than the pike, with the same performance and stiffness, then you might have something and a reason to spend all that money.

    none of that matter though, it's all GOLD.

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