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  1. #1
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    DUC tuning and servicing

    I've got an enduro coming up and need to service my DUC fork. I've downloaded the guide from Maverick which is a huge help and I've googled a few bits as well. Any help with these few bits would be appreciated. Just for info I'm 70kg/140lb trail rider, no massive air or anything.

    Will 10wt oil make much difference over five weight? I know heavier oil will slow the rebound but will it have any other effect?

    In the damper you can adjust the air pressure, what effect will this have on the fork? Am I right in thinking this will adjust how the fork behave on smaller bumps?

    The damper tube is refilled to between 60-65mm of of oil measuered from the top, what effect will this have?

    The air spring can have oil between 5 and 15wt oil added into it what effect will different oil have?

    Final one! Is there an alternative to using maverick supplied vise clamps? Some sort of clever improvisation?

    Apologies for all the questions but this is all pretty new to me and I want to be able to fettle the fork and get it set up without borking it.


    Cheers

  2. #2
    Schipperkes are cool.
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    Yes it will. Heavier oil means slower damping-compression and rebound. I will recommend that 10w is too heavy for you @ 140lbs. Stay with the same brand of suspension oil, as changing brands will cause you to become confused as Brand A and Brand K 5w oil has different specific gravity.

    Yes. Lower air pressure will make the fork more small bump compliant and have a greater tendency to brake dive. Higher pressure will cause harsher compression.

    Keep the oil height @ 63mm; keeps the climbing mode to set correctly and will not hydro lock-if you put too much oil in.

    Putting more oil into the air chamber will cause the air spring to become more progressive, as the chamber is smaller. Less oil keeps the fork feeling more linear.

    I only need the smallest clamp to fully overhaul the damper rods for the fork.
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee
    Better suited to non-aggressive 125# gals named Russell.

  3. #3
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    The manual I have shows an alternative way of accessing the damper assembly where you don't need the large 32mm clamps. You simply remove the entire right side stanchion (remove rebound and travel adjustor knobs, remove 10mm damper rod bolt) and then clamp it back on to your wheel. You can now separate the damper from the stanchion. Check out page 8 of http://www.maverickbike.com/cms_images/file_15.pdf for more detailed instructions.

    I made my own set of 10mm vice clamps for the adjustor rod from a scrap piece of wood (soft material, won't damage the rod) and a Dremel tool. I only disassemble the rod when I am changing out the shim stack (search this forum for several great recommendations on different shim configurations, especially since you are a lighter rider you may want to go with thinner shims), or if the rebound/travel adjustor is not working correctly (I once had a small piece of an o-ring get stuck inside the rod and had to disassemble it to clean it out). If you are only changing the oil in the damper you don't need to change the rod at all so you really don't need the 10mm vice clamps either.

    Have fun tuning and after your event spend some time experimenting with different shim configurations. It is amazing how different the fork feels with even the slightest mod, and then you realize how awesome it is to be able to customize your set-up and spend very little time doing it (I can do a complete oil change and alter my shim stack in about 20 minutes).

    One last bit of advice: do NOT ( ) overtighten the 10mm damper rod bolt (50 in/lbs). If you do it will shear off and be stuck inside damper shaft (yup, there is a thread on that in this forum).

  4. #4
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    Thank you gents. I'll be taking the 10wt stuff back to the shop then. Expect more questions in the future....

  5. #5
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    That trick with clamping the stanch back onto the wheel works great. Still, I do use some rubber vise pads like these for the smaller stuff:



    As for air in the damper cartridge -- though I hesitate to question Banks! -- air in it opposes rebound and without it, as I know firsthand, the fork tops out quickly and harshly. I weigh about 175 lbs loaded and use about 80 psi to counter my other rebound settings.

  6. #6
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    I stripped the fork tonight, more specifically the damper. It looks to have gone well enough. The damper assembly didn't seem to hiss any air but oil did spurt out. It says to use mineral oil, I have no idea what that is, will Isopropyl alcohol do the trick?

  7. #7
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    If ever you can get a large shim (21mm), change it by a 0.1mm thickness instead of the 0.15mm, flat side up !!
    Maverick ML7.2 / SC32
    Maverick ML7.5
    Maverick Durance / Duc32
    Maverick ML8 / BOS Devile

    French Maverick Breeder

  8. #8
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    I'm not going to play with the shim stack this time. I want to be confident in stripping the fork first. I didn't make myself clear in my previous post.... It says to use mineral oil to clean everything, I have no idea what that is, will Isopropyl alcohol do the trick?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by ade634
    I'm not going to play with the shim stack this time. I want to be confident in stripping the fork first. I didn't make myself clear in my previous post.... It says to use mineral oil to clean everything, I have no idea what that is, will Isopropyl alcohol do the trick?
    Yes isopropyl is perfect, or simply hot water and soap + drying.
    This shim recommendation directly comes from Ethan at Maverick. You don't play with, only change one by a less thicker .. and the result
    Maverick ML7.2 / SC32
    Maverick ML7.5
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  10. #10
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    spirits, not oil!!

    Just to be clear, the manual says to clean everything using mineral spirits (a type of paint thinner you can get at any hardware store), not mineral oil. I prefer to using isopropyl alcohol as Alpamayo mentioned. And I totally agree with his advice to go with the .1mm thick 21mm shim. Check your local motocross shop or on-line for suspension shims.

    You mentioned that oil came out of the shrader valve when you released the pressure, I believe that is an indication that the damper was over-filled which would degrade your fork's performance. When you put the whole thing back together make sure you fill to 63mm below the top of the tube using a high quality suspension oil (Torco, Red Line, etc...) and stick with something around 5wt, but not more than 7wt. Add air, I sometimes run about 65 - 70 psi, and you should see notable improvement
    Last edited by g_henrys; 05-02-2011 at 11:53 AM.

  11. #11
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    Hi there, me again. I've reassembled the the damper and put the leg back together (twice actually as I forgot the top out bumper!) It went back together fine but.... It seems that I may have a problem as the rebound/lockdown adjuster on the top the leg was turning when the lower leg was turned at the dropout. I don't think this happened before I stripped the fork. Is it likely that the bolt at the top of the fork isn't done up enough?

    Thanks for all your input- it's great to be able to strip and service this fork and the forum here is invaluable.

  12. #12
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    It may be that the "teeth" on the top of the damper rod have not grabbed the top cap which would make tightening that top bolt difficult, and if that bolt is not tightened the whole unit could rotate. I would try this: after you have inserted the stanchion with the damper into the fork leg, compress it as hard as you can while threading in the top bolt. This should help the top of the damper rod seat into the top cap giving the bolt enough resistance to tighten down. And per my previous post, make sure you do not overtighten that bolt or it will shear off inside the damper tube. Use a torque wrench if available....

  13. #13
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    Thanks for your help everyone, I've been out on a couple of rides on my newly serviced for and it's magic. All your help and support has been great. I'll be doing all my serving by myself from now on.

    Thanks!

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