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  1. #1
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    DUC Service gurus?

    My LBS just doesn't have the skills to work on the DUC reliably and I was debating sending the fork to either Ethan or these guys. Anyone have an opinion on who may be the right guy? My goal would be to minimize the brake dive I get running fairly low pressures (80-85) in order to keep the midstroke supple. I also would like to have the seals stay in place. Suspension Experts has a few cool products as upgrades and I was wondering if they were worth it.


    http://www.mtbsuspensionexperts.com/...d=50&Itemid=74

  2. #2
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    Dirt Labs

    If you don't go with Ethan at Maverick you may want to look into dirtlabs.com
    Luby worked at Maverick for a few years along side Ethan so he is very familiar with tuning and repair on these.
    Randy

  3. #3
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    i had my duc serviced at suspension experts. (sent from new zealand) they replaced everything, dampeners etc and did the seal upgrade. all is good now

    no idea about the other company, just my personal experience was good with suspension experts

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Half Wheeler
    My LBS just doesn't have the skills to work on the DUC reliably and I was debating sending the fork to either Ethan or these guys. Anyone have an opinion on who may be the right guy? My goal would be to minimize the brake dive I get running fairly low pressures (80-85) in order to keep the midstroke supple. I also would like to have the seals stay in place. Suspension Experts has a few cool products as upgrades and I was wondering if they were worth it.


    http://www.mtbsuspensionexperts.com/...d=50&Itemid=74
    Learn how to do it yourself. It's not that hard, you don't need any specialized tools, you'll get to know your fork (so that you can later tune it yourself) and you'll save some money for some nice riding toys! If you know how to work on your bike (install a crankset, bleed brakes, adjust a derailleur) that should be within your skills. Much much easier than some of the other forks I have worked on...

    Just get the DUC32 rebuilt kit from Ethan and download the excellent how-to pdf from the Maverick web site. The first time it might take you 1/2 day, the next time you'll do it in less than one hour.

  5. #5
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    The ultimate goal would be to be able to work on it myself. I'm not close to any of the tuners so it would make life a ton easier. Somewhere I had seen a referrence to a DUC tool kit. Anyone know what I'm talking about?

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Half Wheeler
    The ultimate goal would be to be able to work on it myself. I'm not close to any of the tuners so it would make life a ton easier. Somewhere I had seen a referrence to a DUC tool kit. Anyone know what I'm talking about?
    There are a few "special tools" (32mm and 10mm shaft clamps and bushing tool) but I have serviced my DUC32's for years now and never required any of them. For the clamp tools, the 32mm isn't really necessary (the service manual gives an alternate way to take the fork apart that does not require it). For the 10mm, I have a set of very soft rubber jaws on my vise that work as well. For the bushing tool, in 5000 miles on one of my DUC32 I haven't had the need to replace the bushing, so unless yours has worn out prematurely or has a lot of miles, you shouldn't it.

    The first thing I recommend you do is check the service manual on Maverick Web Site. This will give you an idea of what's involved in the service.

    If this looks doable to you, then you can order the DUC32 service kit, get some fork oil from a local motorcycle shop (cheaper than the bicycle shops in my experience) and set aside 1/2 day to do it.

    Happy trails.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Half Wheeler
    My LBS just doesn't have the skills to work on the DUC reliably and I was debating sending the fork to either Ethan or these guys. Anyone have an opinion on who may be the right guy? My goal would be to minimize the brake dive I get running fairly low pressures (80-85) in order to keep the midstroke supple. I also would like to have the seals stay in place. Suspension Experts has a few cool products as upgrades and I was wondering if they were worth it.


    http://www.mtbsuspensionexperts.com/...d=50&Itemid=74
    I would hands down send it to Kevin at S-Experts. That IFP makes a world of difference to an already great fork.

    IFPs are nothing new to the world of suspension. They are commonly used in rear shocks to provide separation between oil and pressurized nitrogen or air. The oil moves through the damper in a predictable way because it is air-free and as a result, damping remains consistent from the top of the mountain to the bottom. Our use of the IFP in Maverick forks gives us lots of tuning options. We can alter the depth of the piston to provide more or less bottom-out resistance. We change pressures behind the piston according to body weight and riding style.

    One of my pet peeves with long-travel forks is the tendency to "dive" or collapse under weight shifts. A rider's weight shifts forward during braking and when descending steeps, this robs the rider of suspension travel when they need it most. The small pocket of pressure behind the IFP provides resistance to fork dive without sacrificing small-bump sensitivity.

    With our IFP, you'll experience more consistent damping, increased tuning options and less fork-dive. All this for a bargain at $15.

  8. #8
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    Agree with Denis, the fork is "dumb simple" to work on. Another person is Banks @ Absolute Bikes in Salida, Colorado.
    Good luck!
    Training on Hills Builds Character, That's How I Got To Be One!

  9. #9
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    I also agree with Denis. After you do it once, you'll always want to do it yourself! If you do decide to DIY, be sure to disassemble everything in a very clean area to avoid dust or debris from getting onto the internal components.

    I'm curious about the IFP from suspension experts. For $15, it defenitly seems worth it for the performance upgrade.

  10. #10
    Schipperkes are cool.
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    Quote Originally Posted by IRONMAN1518
    Agree with Denis, the fork is "dumb simple" to work on. Another person is Banks @ Absolute Bikes in Salida, Colorado.
    Good luck!


    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee
    Better suited to non-aggressive 125# gals named Russell.

  11. #11
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    DIY gets PDQ

    Another for DIY -- saves money, downtime, and mechanical arts! If you have a Maverick frame and a Speedball, you'll benefit from the economies, too. And consider the lost time in removing the fork, packaging...unpackaging, and reassembling -- could've done it yourself by then in one evening.

  12. #12
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    DIY train boarded. I do want to try the IFP though.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Half Wheeler
    DIY train boarded. I do want to try the IFP though.
    If you get it, let me know how it turns out as I am curious, especially curious as it looks like a trivial enough modification that I wonder why Maverick hasn't implemented it on the DUC and SC32 as a factory option. Maybe a intellectual property issue...

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Denis
    If you get it, let me know how it turns out as I am curious, especially curious as it looks like a trivial enough modification that I wonder why Maverick hasn't implemented it on the DUC and SC32 as a factory option. Maybe a intellectual property issue...
    There is an IFP on the 69er version of the Duc, because du to the lower travel there is enough of place in the chamber. Whenever you are full travel the IFP should touch the bottom of the cartridge and the head of the valve .... Ask Ethan regarding this issue.
    Maverick ML7.2 / SC32
    Maverick ML7.5
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    French Maverick Breeder

  15. #15
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    W/O an IFP the fork lowers more in climbing mode. That means that you can climb stuff w/o tipping over backward easier. So there is a tradeoff. It might be heavier too.

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