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  1. #1
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    Chain suck in muddy conditions

    Hi felow Maverick owners,

    it doesn't get wet much around here, but May and the first half of June were really wet, so the rides have been really muddy. One thing that I have discovered is that my Durance tends to suffer from chain suck when things get muddy. It seems to be pretty consistent and so far I have only had it happen in granny gear, when going uphill. Is anybody else experiencing this?

    Thanks a lot.
    A climb is really just a flat piece of road that points up. A headwind is a climb that you can't see. So it's all flat road, really.

  2. #2
    Schipperkes are cool.
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    Chain suck is not the bike, it's the lack of the correct chain lube.

    For wet muddy conditions, wax stuff has no lubrication properties as wax cannot stick to metal chemically or physically. Dry non wax lubes, like Dumonde Tech, will be slightly better, though will be scraped off. Use a wet lube, TriFlow, Pedros Syn Lube, etc of the best defense against chain suck.
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee
    Better suited to non-aggressive 125# gals named Russell.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbblackdiamond
    Hi felow Maverick owners,

    it doesn't get wet much around here, but May and the first half of June were really wet, so the rides have been really muddy. One thing that I have discovered is that my Durance tends to suffer from chain suck when things get muddy. It seems to be pretty consistent and so far I have only had it happen in granny gear, when going uphill. Is anybody else experiencing this?

    Thanks a lot.
    I don't think it's Durance specific. Most of the times it happened to me it was solved by a new front ring, new chain and maybe new cassette.

    What I experience in these cases is that the front ring is worn to a point where the teeth have been deformed by the pressure of the chain links, the metal has been pushed out by the pressure and is protruding on the edge of the teeth. This makes the teeth edge wider, and when adding the grit of the mud, the chain get stuck on the ring. When a jammed links goes around the ring, then there isn't enough tension from the rear derailleur to pull it out of the teeth on return side of the front ring. The chains then "climbs" back on the back of the rings and jams up.

    You usually don't see it happen when you just spin the crank because there isn't enough tension on the chain and pressure on the chain / ring interface to cause the chain to jam on the ring.

    When that happens during a ride, just finish you ride in the middle ring (good exercise), When back home, the fix is to get a new front ring. And since every time you change a ring you should change the chain... a new chain is recommended. And if it's become that bad, you should probably toss in a new cassette too (and middle ring!).

    If you don't have a small ring handy and have to wait for the mail-order to come in or your LBS is closed for the week-end, and still want to ride, you can take the small ring out and file the teeth edges back to flat. That should fix it until you get new parts.

    Lube might help as Banks suggests. Altho in my experience it doesn't do much for wear and chain suck. I actually thinks that it could make things worse as it allows grit to stick to the chain. But lube is great against noisy drivetrains!

    Hope this helps.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Denis
    I don't think it's Durance specific. Most of the times it happened to me it was solved by a new front ring, new chain and maybe new cassette.

    What I experience in these cases is that the front ring is worn to a point where the teeth have been deformed by the pressure of the chain links, the metal has been pushed out by the pressure and is protruding on the edge of the teeth. This makes the teeth edge wider, and when adding the grit of the mud, the chain get stuck on the ring. When a jammed links goes around the ring, then there isn't enough tension from the rear derailleur to pull it out of the teeth on return side of the front ring. The chains then "climbs" back on the back of the rings and jams up.

    You usually don't see it happen when you just spin the crank because there isn't enough tension on the chain and pressure on the chain / ring interface to cause the chain to jam on the ring.

    When that happens during a ride, just finish you ride in the middle ring (good exercise), When back home, the fix is to get a new front ring. And since every time you change a ring you should change the chain... a new chain is recommended. And if it's become that bad, you should probably toss in a new cassette too (and middle ring!).

    If you don't have a small ring handy and have to wait for the mail-order to come in or your LBS is closed for the week-end, and still want to ride, you can take the small ring out and file the teeth edges back to flat. That should fix it until you get new parts.

    Lube might help as Banks suggests. Altho in my experience it doesn't do much for wear and chain suck. I actually thinks that it could make things worse as it allows grit to stick to the chain. But lube is great against noisy drivetrains!

    Hope this helps.
    As much as what you and Banks are saying make sense, I come from a bike where I never _ever_ had chain suck, and I rode it in the ugliest conditions one can experience, so the bike _does_ have something to do with it. Both my small chainring and chain were new at the beginning of the season and I also experienced it with 2 different crankset, hence my question about whether the Durance was more prone to chain suck than other bikes.

    The Rocky Mountain of a friend of mine used to be plagued with chain suck, where the smallest amount of sticky mud would make it happen.

    As Denis said, I guess I just need to get stronger and stop using my smallest chainring so much....
    A climb is really just a flat piece of road that points up. A headwind is a climb that you can't see. So it's all flat road, really.

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