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  1. #1
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    Aluminum vs. Magnesium Monolink

    For reference, I am riding a 2006 Seven Duo--the 4" version similar to the recently discontinued Duo-Lux

    Is there that much of a difference in the ride between the magnesium monolink (which I have) vs. the aluminum? Visually, it looks like the bottom bracket is farther forward on the aluminum--implying less of a lock out while in a standing position (which is my complaint with the bike). Is it worth the $250 if my magnesium monolink is still functioning as designed? Seating and climbing, best bike in class--standing and descending, not all that plush, in my opinion.

    Thanks
    Rick

  2. #2
    Gentleman Loser
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    The Al link runs a little better with Maverick's more recent purely air-sprung shocks.

  3. #3
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    Thanks--any thoughts on the bottom bracket location differences and the effect on the suspension compliance while standing? Conceptually it seems like it should improve compliance as it may allow more "rotational" movement around the bottom bracket. Thoughts? Also, my rear shock is the air version (7.2 version maybe?)

  4. #4
    Schipperkes are cool.
    Reputation: banks's Avatar
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    The BB is more fowards, the cable guide has more radius for smoother shifting.

    !! There can be clearance problems with the MBits Air/Coil rear shock, with the Side mounted Rebound knob, between the bottom of the shock body & the black MonoLink.
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee
    Better suited to non-aggressive 125# gals named Russell.
    I ride so slow, your Garmin will shut off.

  5. #5
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    As you suggested, the Al link lowers the leverage applied by a standing rider's weight, so standing performance is different, possibly better.

    For me, the increase in durability was worth the switch.

  6. #6
    Fortes Fortuna Iuvat
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    Quote Originally Posted by rickhoss
    Seating and climbing, best bike in class--standing and descending, not all that plush, in my opinion.
    It can definitely be on the stiff side when descending. I find that if I add in another click or two of rebound it makes a noticeable difference. On the other side, if I know I'll be doing alot of climbing I will take away some rebound to help keep the rear planted. But then, I am running ALOT of air pressure (~220psi) which negatively affects small bump compliance.

    That's what I love about the Mavericks-They feel like a hardtail but don't beat the crap out of ya like one.
    Maverick Durance Ano-DUC32/C KING/XTR
    Mav ML8 Ano-DUC32/X0
    Mav ML8-DUC32/I9/XTR
    09 Spec. Demo-Totem-Ti DHX
    Norco Team DH

  7. #7
    Schipperkes are cool.
    Reputation: banks's Avatar
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    I think that the OP has the grey Maverick link, not the Trek/Klein Palomino "link" that uses top hat bushings & is bawlzs crappy.
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee
    Better suited to non-aggressive 125# gals named Russell.
    I ride so slow, your Garmin will shut off.

  8. #8
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    MonoLink

    The newer alloy cast MonoLink will gain you about 50ish grams., much more long term durability.
    It will position the BB a 1/2" up and a 1/2" forward, torward the front pivot.
    By moving the BB closer to the main forward pivot you effectively reduce the sprung weight on the BB, thus making it more compliant when standing (most sprung weight on the BB). This will also make the system more over all compliant. We don't get much complaint of "bob" so that's a personal judgement and set-up, so you'll have to make the call on that. As Datalogger suggested, reduce your rebound, which most people have set to high. The more active the system, the more compliant, but will not overall effect body induced movement.
    For a 06 bike the alloy MonoLink should be a direct bolt in. You may need to lower the height of one of the adjusting screws on a E-Type derailleur, but that's it. Shifting will be improved not only by the cable location but the rearward bias of the der, compared to the older location. Enjoy~
    Last edited by Ethan F; 01-16-2009 at 08:55 PM.

  9. #9
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    Awesome, thanks for the explanation guys--sounds like an upgrade worth doing.
    See you out there,
    Rick

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