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  1. #1
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    I got really really lost in Lexington Landlocked Forest today.

    Well I made my way to Landlocked Forest for the second time today and decided to ride north this time. There was seriously a junction every few hundred meters and I kept stopping and getting more and more confused. The place looks pretty big and it seems to have some nice trails, but I can't find a nice long clearly marked loop for the life of me

    I hit some shorter loops to the south (between I95 and the powerlines) but they are a bit too twisty and have a lot of medium sized rocks with edges oriented to the trail in a way that makes them hard to hit head on. It's frustrating because both prohibit me from going as fast as I would like to.

  2. #2
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    I agree that a lot of those trails look alike and I get a bit confused. To remedy this I just turn the brain off and when I get to an intersection I just ride what looks good, whether it's something new, something I just rode, or a trail I rode earlier the opposite way.

  3. #3
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    Here's a map: http://www.landlockedforest.com/trailmap_7-11.pdf

    The yellow loop is blazed and pretty easy to follow. If you have a smartphone, find an app that pulls data from OpenStreetMap. Pretty much all of the trails in LLF are mapped out on OSM. Also, the major loops have recently shown up on Google Maps as well.

    If you're coming in from the power lines, I'd suggest you take a left at the bottom of the first hill. Follow that trail down, then take your first left and go over the bridge. At the end of the bridge, take a right and down the hill. Follow that up and explore. When you've had enough, head east until you hit RT3 and then follow that trail south until you hit the power lines.

    I'd offer to show you around, but I pretty much exclusively ride there before work (6am). If you're up for that, name the day and I'll be happy to give a tour.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by car_nut View Post

    The yellow loop is blazed and pretty easy to follow. If you have a smartphone, find an app that pulls data from OpenStreetMap. Pretty much all of the trails in LLF are mapped out on OSM. Also, the major loops have recently shown up on Google Maps as well.

    If you're coming in from the power lines, I'd suggest you take a left at the bottom of the first hill. Follow that trail down, then take your first left and go over the bridge. At the end of the bridge, take a right and down the hill. Follow that up and explore. When you've had enough, head east until you hit RT3 and then follow that trail south until you hit the power lines.

    I'd offer to show you around, but I pretty much exclusively ride there before work (6am). If you're up for that, name the day and I'll be happy to give a tour.
    Thanks,

    I found the trail map online too. I didn't realize there was a whole website dedicated to this place. I did see a yellow markers here and there, so I guess I should just follow them next time heh.

  5. #5
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    Sburck, something I had to learn on my own when I started riding is that the concept of "lost" changes a lot with the factors of stamina, experience on the bike, and sense of direction. I used to think "OMG IM LOST AND IM GUNNA DIE LOLZ" when I wasn't sure where I was for like 15 minutes. Now that's just par for the course.

    Scope out the trails online before you go - there's nary a trail in MA that doesn't have some sort of online presence. If you're new to a trail, hit up the MTBR and NEMBA sites and find a ride buddy to show you around. If you're on your own, find the blazed loops and follow them, normally off a sign at the trailhead.

    Lastly, at a place like LLF, you're never really THAT lost since there are houses, roads, and highways bordering almost everything, so make sure you've got water and a snack bar in your Camelbak and go explore! That's part of the joy of riding.

    But keep that charged cell phone with you just in case, too.

  6. #6
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    Make sure you ride milk crate. It has a milk crate on tree at the start. The friends of the LLF has trail map too.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fitch View Post
    Sburck, something I had to learn on my own when I started riding is that the concept of "lost" changes a lot with the factors of stamina, experience on the bike, and sense of direction. I used to think "OMG IM LOST AND IM GUNNA DIE LOLZ" when I wasn't sure where I was for like 15 minutes. Now that's just par for the course.

    Scope out the trails online before you go - there's nary a trail in MA that doesn't have some sort of online presence. If you're new to a trail, hit up the MTBR and NEMBA sites and find a ride buddy to show you around. If you're on your own, find the blazed loops and follow them, normally off a sign at the trailhead.

    Lastly, at a place like LLF, you're never really THAT lost since there are houses, roads, and highways bordering almost everything, so make sure you've got water and a snack bar in your Camelbak and go explore! That's part of the joy of riding.

    But keep that charged cell phone with you just in case, too.
    Yeah, I hear you but I guess I don't enjoy exploring as much as some people. I like to find a trail I like where I know what is ahead so I can hit it hard. I'm not a daredevil by any means, but I enjoy mountain biking for the thrill. When I don't know where I am / whats around me I end up riding a bit too slowly and carefully to have fun.

  8. #8
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    Drop me a PM sometime when you're looking to get in some miles on the weekend and I'll take you on fun burner of the area if you'd like -- let me know what kind of pace and how long of a ride you're looking for. I live in Metrowest, but I'd be happy to head out there for some riding again sometime.

  9. #9
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    i'd be up for checking it out. i can ride mon, wed, and fri around 1:30-2pm if that works for anyone

  10. #10
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    You pedal in New England and complain about rocks? Yowser. Pedal faster, you'll go right over them.

  11. #11
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    Caution;  Merge;  Workers Ahead!

    Quote Originally Posted by leeboh View Post
    You pedal in New England and complain about rocks? Yowser. Pedal faster, you'll go right over them.
    Yeah, I was kind of thinking the same. sburck, I don't know what your biking experience is or if you're new to New England, but LLF is definitely on the smoother side of what's available around here for single track.

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