Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    LynnWoodsTrekker
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    9

    Good Intermediate area in Lynn Woods?

    Hello everyone, Newb to the site here. New to mountain biking too, but a former BMX'er. Luckily enough, I live 5 mins away from Lynn Woods and have started making trips there. It is indeed some rough terrain, though I don't run with anyone to know how to assess my own ability against there's. I figure I'm not a novice since I rode single speed BMX's through the woods for many many years. My problem is, I'm married with two kids and can't afford more than the completely ridgid Trek that I picked up at a yard sale and I don't want to break it. Anyone know any specific tracks that I can gain skills on that aren't super risky for my bike? Also, was hoping I could talk my wife into letting me out for a ride today, think Lynn Woods is rideable after last nights rain?

  2. #2
    I like to ride my bike.
    Reputation: RideFaster's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    1,575
    Quote Originally Posted by learninglynnwoods
    Hello everyone, Newb to the site here. New to mountain biking too, but a former BMX'er. Luckily enough, I live 5 mins away from Lynn Woods and have started making trips there. It is indeed some rough terrain, though I don't run with anyone to know how to assess my own ability against there's. I figure I'm not a novice since I rode single speed BMX's through the woods for many many years. My problem is, I'm married with two kids and can't afford more than the completely ridgid Trek that I picked up at a yard sale and I don't want to break it. Anyone know any specific tracks that I can gain skills on that aren't super risky for my bike? Also, was hoping I could talk my wife into letting me out for a ride today, think Lynn Woods is rideable after last nights rain?
    #1: Welcome to mtbr.com
    #2: Did I sell you a set of wheels with IRC tires and shimano hubs?
    #3: Lynn Woods is technical...both the right and left side are tough. The left may not have drops and rollers, but, I used to ride on that side, and it's not easy. The right side of the resivor is the famous side that has dare-devil stuff. I'm still learning the trails too, so I can't help you out with trail suggestions.
    #4: Visit dieselbikes.com , they ride at Lynn Woods about 2 days a week, they do trail work and are a great group to ride with. There are Tuesday night rides and weekend rides. (Always on the right side) Dieselbikes.com has maps of lynn woods and rates the trails hard, easy,.....
    #5: Back in the day, people rode lynn ridgid. My neighbor used to ride Lynn every morning on his ridgid Trek.....on the right side. It can be done, but, it might stress you and the bike.
    #6: Lynn Woods drys out fast and rarley is muddy or slippery..........................................GO RIDE!!!!


    Have fun and hope to see you on the trails!
    I like bicycles. Bicycles make me happy. Riding them makes me even happier.
    Scott Bicycles
    Maxxis Tires
    Team Blog

  3. #3
    Huh?
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    819
    If you come in from the ballfield, stay on the left side. There is plenty of easier challenges over there. Once you're comfortable over there I would start exploring the right side. You can ride everywhere in Lynn on a hardtail its just a matter of how much abuse your body and bike can take if you're not a smooth rider. Just remember if in doubt walk it and live to ride another day (this goes for the right side) Always where the helmet there and knee and shin pads will be a good investment for the future if you find you're riding more on the right side. Have fun.

    M.

  4. #4
    LynnWoodsTrekker
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    9
    Thanks for the replies. Got out for a couple of hours but burnt out quick. Went to steel tower. Tried a couple of smaller trails that I wasnt ready for. Wish I could see what other people do for tracks there so I could know what to work towards. I have some more questions for anyone willing to answer... remember, I am a newb, so it does sound stupid. First off, what is free riding (freestyle?). Second, it's been a long time since I've been on a bicycle or had to work on one, so my question is; are there forks with suspension (Rox Shox) that WON'T fit on a 1990's Trek, or are they pretty interchangable? Third, are there any other parts I could replace that would help me with Lynn Woods, so as to allow me to rebuild a bicycle one part at a time instead of all at once and getting divorced over it? I figure I can keep buying parts, then I'll buy the frame with rear suspension last. What PARTS matter the most on these trails I guess is what I'm asking? If you had a huge mortgage to pay and not much money left after, what would you start with?

    Anyhow, I can't believe I let bikes fall out of my life so long. I feel like I'm 13 again (except going up those goddamn hills). Guess I just got a drivers license and it was easier, so I forgot how much fun biking is. Anyone that wants to ride Lynn with me and show me the ropes let me know. I'm looking forward to getting to a competitive level at some point in time, but thats probably a long time away. I'll enjoy the whole trip meanwhile. Happy riding people!

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    62
    I don't want to get too much into the stratification of the mountain bike into so many different genres, which I think is somewhat fatuous and is mostly a by-product of clever marketing, but here's a good thread from the VT/NH/ME which goes into some of the rise and decline of freeriding:
    Is freeriding dead?

    As for upgrades, I would consider some good tires of at least 2.2" width to be the first priority. For years I ran tires (on my X-country hardtail) with widths around 2", somewhat because of weight concerns, and somewhat because wider tires weren't so widely available back in the day as they are now. The extra traction, cushioning, and protection from pinch flats provided from going to 2" to around 2.25" tires which I run now is very significant. There are so many brands and styles of tire out there that you could write a master thesis on the comparison of them all, but to keep it simple I would recommend IRC trail bears on a budget, which I purchased as a pair on clearance last year for less than $15 each and overall have been excellent and hard wearing, though I'm not sure they are still in prodcution. I wouldn't worry about the whole tubeless thing for now, their advantages against pinch flats are pretty marginal if you run a wide tire with a reasonable pressure (above 35psi).

    Second would probably be some quality brakes and pads. I still run V-brakes but clearly disk brakes are the way to go, but for you with the older frame you won't be able to run disks anyways, and I get excellent performance from XTR V-brakes with koolstop pads (a necessity, shimano v-brake pads are terrible). You can probably get some used XTRs or avids for a reasonable price on ebay.

    Next would be a good suspension fork, and the standard now is 1 1/8" threadless headsets, check to see what your frame has. If you have a 1" headset your selection will be extremely limited and your best bet would be to get some cheap decent vintage 1" fork off ebay to tide you over. Otherwise, I can highly recommend Fox float forks, I run an F80RL which I purchased at a reasonable price of $300 slightly used on ebay last year, it is super plush but maybe outside your budget range, and the longer travel F100 series is probably preferable for most people. I haven't tried the latest offerings by Marzocchi but it seems they have the best selection of plush, stiff, reliable, and reasonably priced forks right now, they are just a little on the heavy side.

    After that the sky is the limit. I know i'm going to sound like a luddite, but full suspension is not totally necessary and for me adds more weight, complexity, and another thing that can break. Of course there are many great designs today but the price is a little steep. I run a titanium hardtail (Dean) that is light and delivers a very forgiving ride, and can be had used for a very reasonably price (I got a dean colonel with full XTR last summer on ebay for $520). I don't typically ride extremely difficult terrain so I can get by with v-brakes and a hardtail, but clearly if you want to ride the most challenging stuff you will probably eventually want full suspension and disk brakes, just be ready to pay some $$$$ for a decent setup.

  6. #6
    Huh?
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    819
    I wouldn't upgrade anything on that old hardtail. You may not be able to transfer it to your next bike. Just ride the snot out of it and keep your eyes peeled for a good deal new or used. As you can see from the link below you can get a lot for a little nowadays when buying a bike. There are a lot of great companies making complete full suspension bikes affordable. Kona, Iron Horse, Trek, Giant, Haro to name a few.

    http://www.performancebike.com/shop/...tegory_ID=3050

  7. #7
    LynnWoodsTrekker
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    9
    in my days giant and trek ruled the roads behind the hard to obtain cannondales, how do they fair nowadays? I've been seeing those kunos or whatever theyre called, can a giant compete with that? My favorite mountain bike used to be a giant, but i didnt really take it off road then as I was young and didn't understand the general purpose of bikes then apparently. I'm still almost of the opinion that I could still BMX those lynn woods trails, but its so hard to remember now. I'm probably mistaken. Not sure what a great drop is... but on those bmx's, I KNOW i was landing jumps of like 12 feet in the air. then again, I could bunny hop a foot and a half and seem to get about 3 inches now... its a different world to me.

  8. #8
    LynnWoodsTrekker
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    9
    just clocked another hour, this time street hours as its pouring. this stuff is addictive. what my wife doesnt understand is how much this is helping me as an owner operator roofer. ive already got more energy than ive had in ten years. the other day i went to work and did twice as much as ive done in ten years. she wont get it. I'm soaked to the bone, cold, tired, aching... and happy. with all my future winnings at work from the renewed energy im buying a real bike whether she likes it or not!

  9. #9
    Huh?
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    819
    All of the manufacturers I listed have thier pros and cons. Which one is better is only a matter of opinion really. When on a tight budget beggers can't be choosers and therefore you need to get the most bang for your buck. There is a wealth of information on this site visit the manufacturers forums to seek your answers to specific brands.

  10. #10
    person
    Reputation: G-VegasMTBiker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    684
    With the older frame you have you'll most likely need a 1'' steer tube. Marzocchi still makes there MX Comp w/ a 1'' steer tube option. Real great fork for the money
    My epiglottis is full of bees!

    Slapheadmofo
    EPhatch

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    62
    On second thought it is probably better to just save up a bit and buy a whole new or used rig rather than upgrading your old bike piecemeal. It's a cheaper to buy a whole bike than buy components one at a time, especially ones that might not be compatible with a newer ride. And you could probably sell the trek on craigslist for $100 or so and use that. A new bike bought at a discount may be the way to go, but if you look around on ebay you notice quickly that mountain bikes depreciate very quickly, especially compared to road bikes. This is probably because the technology keeps changing so fast and because of the perception and fact that mtn bikes sustain a lot more abuse. But this means if you are careful you can get a nice 5 year old mtn bike with top of the line components at a fraction of the price it was new. Whether that is a better buy than spending the equivalent $ on a new bike with middle of the road components but newer technology is debateable. IMO if you do all the work on your own bike then going for a good used rig is a better deal, but if you don't have the time, skill, or tools to work on your bike then you're better off buying a new bike.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    184
    if you are to buy a new/used bike make sure it has a nice solid rear triangle. If you are going to be riding lynn woods alot it will put a beating on your bike and you (pad up). Dont upgrade what you have, its not worth it. you can find a nice all mountian hardtail for under a grand. And remember the cheap components are cheap for a reason! Solid wheel set, brakes, cranks and bb will be your best friend in Lynn. 5 inch travel fork is nice to have too. 80-100mm just doesnt cut it for trail riding imo (unless you are racing xc)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •