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  1. #1
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    The Official Marin Wolf Ridge with Naild R3ACT suspension thread.

    OMG, this is cool! Those who have ridden it, say it's as good as the hype. I just love when something different and ground breaking comes along. I just hope they have a 27.5 version.


  2. #2
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    Wow, interesting.

    Sent from my SM-G925T using Tapatalk

  3. #3
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    @ 4:15 or so, he's compressing the suspension. The derailleur cage is flexing forward. This indicates that the BB to axle distance is getting longer, and there is a rearward axle path. This in turn, usually means that pedal forces will oppose suspension compression.

    It still might be very good suspension, but this refutes the claim that 'pedal forces and suspension are 100% isolated from each other".

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    Wonder how it compares to Kona's Magic Link

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Procter View Post

    It still might be very good suspension, but this refutes the claim that 'pedal forces and suspension are 100% isolated from each other".

    I agree. Look at the piece on vitalmtb, Voss says enough blatantly untrue things that a reasonable person would be pretty skeptical of everything else he says. (my personal favorite: that the bike is maybe 10% of the mass of the rider - in the context of a 30# bike).
    There's also the obvious question: if this design needs that little damping, why did they spec one of the most expensive, sophisticated dampers you can buy? They said they got it de-tuned from Fox, but again, if it's not relying on damping, why not get an inexpensive mono-tube shock (according to that Vorsprung video, the main advantage of twin-tube dampers is you can get really high damper forces without risking cavitation)?


    I'm sure it's different than what's out there now. It might be great, but it's almost guaranteed to under-deliver on their promises just because they've made such outrageous claims.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joules View Post
    I agree. Look at the piece on vitalmtb, Voss says enough blatantly untrue things that a reasonable person would be pretty skeptical of everything else he says. (my personal favorite: that the bike is maybe 10% of the mass of the rider - in the context of a 30# bike).
    There's also the obvious question: if this design needs that little damping, why did they spec one of the most expensive, sophisticated dampers you can buy? They said they got it de-tuned from Fox, but again, if it's not relying on damping, why not get an inexpensive mono-tube shock (according to that Vorsprung video, the main advantage of twin-tube dampers is you can get really high damper forces without risking cavitation)?


    I'm sure it's different than what's out there now. It might be great, but it's almost guaranteed to under-deliver on their promises just because they've made such outrageous claims.
    I took the "pedal forces are 100% isolated from suspension" to mean that the anti-squat was near 100%, so while the chain growth does interact with the suspension, it is to a degree that balances natural weight transfer induced squatting. That is in contrast to a totally chain neutral bike with 0% anti-squat, which would feel quite mushy. Having said that, the anti-squat charts I saw on Pinkbike were in the 120-150% range, which would suggest, as Procter mentioned, that it actually overshot the target and might try to actually rise a bit under high pedal loads due to excess chain growth.

    Regarding the Vital article, I went when I saw that "bike is 10% of total weight comment too!

    This whole "we did a bunch of calculations and figured out something everyone is missing" really sounds like BS when they only back up their claim with vagaries.

    Regarding the damping, aside from the question of if the only reason we usually use more damping is for firm pedaling, I have seen the question raised as to if there is a lot of stiction in the telescope assembly and so the lack of damping is simply compensating for this "friction damping".

    I've been hoping to see some IC migration charts, and asked on AndreXTR's facebook page if he or some of the other guys could post the calculations they said they already did.

  7. #7
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    I am more interested in how the bike rides than whatever is claimed.

    I would also like to know how much rear tire clearance there is and what size tire will fit in the back.

    I may consider one of these models for a future purchase along with the 2017 Specialized Enduro 29/6 Fattie.

    It is kind of odd that they don't recommend it for bike parks (or was not designed for)...seems like a fairly strong frame.

    I didn't find a mailing list on their site, hopefully they will have some demo bikes to ride in Southern California.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joules View Post
    if this design needs that little damping, why did they spec one of the most expensive, sophisticated dampers you can buy?
    Because shocks do more than damp.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jbsocal View Post
    I would also like to know how much rear tire clearance there is and what size tire will fit in the back.

    It is kind of odd that they don't recommend it for bike parks (or was not designed for)...seems like a fairly strong frame.
    They claim clearance for a 2.6" tire in the back, which seems very reasonable to me given the intended usage. With that swingarm design, I wouldn't be surprised if you could even downsize to 27.5 and run a 3.0" tire if you wanted.

    Regarding the strength, it has a definite visual mass to it, but it also has some thin link arms, a relatively unsupported bottom bracket, and that whole telescope assembly all placed in one of the most highly stressed areas on the bike. I'm not saying it couldn't take bike park riding, just that the visual strength may not be representative of the mechanical strength of it.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mountain Cycle Shawn View Post
    Because shocks do more than damp.
    Such as?

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheKaiser View Post
    Such as?
    Dissipate heat generated from repeating compression cycles, control rebound to allow better tracking through different terrain, provide progressive or linear feels that are more fine tuneable than that around which the frame was designed... etc etc etc.

    I feel like the people here are the same people that could be found in the 650b plus forum bashing plus tires before they ever even rode one. How about we wait until they are out and being ridden before jumping to conclusions about suspension performance when you haven't even ridden the bike yourself.

    If this bike even remotely performs as well as ALL (yes, ALL) of the first ride reviews have indicated, it's going to be an amazing bike! For me, it's the perfect bike... long travel 29er brawler that can climb like a 120mm bike. From the videos I've seen of Kyle Warner riding this bike, it does ride as well as they say.

    Yes, mine is on order... and yes, I splurged for the pro model... and yes, it's going to be f(*king awesome!

    Don't be haters on something you haven't even ridden.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigmike9699 View Post
    Dissipate heat generated from repeating compression cycles, control rebound to allow better tracking through different terrain, provide progressive or linear feels that are more fine tuneable than that around which the frame was designed... etc etc etc.

    I feel like the people here are the same people that could be found in the 650b plus forum bashing plus tires before they ever even rode one. How about we wait until they are out and being ridden before jumping to conclusions about suspension performance when you haven't even ridden the bike yourself.

    If this bike even remotely performs as well as ALL (yes, ALL) of the first ride reviews have indicated, it's going to be an amazing bike! For me, it's the perfect bike... long travel 29er brawler that can climb like a 120mm bike. From the videos I've seen of Kyle Warner riding this bike, it does ride as well as they say.

    Yes, mine is on order... and yes, I splurged for the pro model... and yes, it's going to be f(*king awesome!

    Don't be haters on something you haven't even ridden.
    Very well said! Yeah, this bike is going to piss off a lot of people who recently spent a lot of money on a bike, only to have it seriously outdated.
    Last edited by Mountain Cycle Shawn; 04-25-2017 at 07:52 PM. Reason: I ****ed up!

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigmike9699 View Post

    I feel like the people here are the same people that could be found in the 650b plus forum bashing plus tires before they ever even rode one. How about we wait until they are out and being ridden before jumping to conclusions about suspension performance when you haven't even ridden the bike yourself.

    Don't be haters on something you haven't even ridden.
    +

    I don't have the experience on these type of bikes (full sus) nor the technical acuity to understand many aspects of design compromises and successes but I do believe a design can trump the ability to have it adequately explained in a short simple Q & A setting.

    Some things engineering, physics and kinesthetic don't lend themselves to easy or simple explanations nor do engineers always align themselves as the best layperson decoder.

    I do understand if the critics feel they've caught an exaggeration or misrepresentation in something that sounds like B.S. but I'm sure given more time and opportunity, poorly stated or worded explanations can be better thought out or better translated.

    It seems to me the excitement of this concept has slipped out a bit ahead of the information curve. I hope it's as good as they say or even more impressive by delivering better than expected performance.

    In the Middle Ages, the biggest mistake was not putting on your armor because you were 'just going down to the corner.'

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigmike9699 View Post
    Dissipate heat generated from repeating compression cycles, control rebound to allow better tracking through different terrain, provide progressive or linear feels that are more fine tuneable than that around which the frame was designed... etc etc etc.
    I agree with you on all those points, however those demands for heat dissipation, rebound control, etc...should all be significantly lower with this bike, because there will be a commensurate reduction in the heat generation that goes along with 40-60% less damping force that this design allows. In other words, this bike isn't one that is likely to be overdriving any generally high quality shock.

    Air volume tunability is certainly important, but I am not aware of the X2 being uniquely tunable in this way.

    Having said that, it is possible that the X2 has some other quality that makes it better on this bike, like greater independence of hi/low speed damping or something like that, so that you can run very light low speed while maintaining the ability to adjust high speed, or something like that.

    Congratulations on the new bike order, I hope that it is awesome, and it very well may be the best thing ever. I am really hoping that these thing are as good as they say, and I will gladly place an order myself if they prove to be. I don't think people are being unreasonable in their skepticism, though. It is the old extraordinary claims require extraordinary evidence thing, and the only evidence we have so far so far are some magazine "first ride" puff pieces, which are almost always favorable for any new model, and some tech explanations from the designer that seem to deliberately skirt the generally agreed upon measures of rear suspension engineering. That nowhere close to meeting my minimum threshold to buy in to the claims, however I am eager to learn more, as the info becomes available, and would certainly love to take a spin on one.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mountain Cycle Shawn View Post
    Very well said! Yeah, this bike is going to piss off a lot of people who resenlty spent a lot of money on a bike, only to have it seriously outdated.
    I love disruptive tech as much or more than anyone, but you have to understand that truly revolutionary designs are a real rarity, while claims about a design being revolutionary are fairly common. Keep in mind that all these same claims were made about VPP when it came out, and while it is a good system, it isn't dramatically better than DW-link, FSR, or even a really well designed single pivot. They all turned out to have compromises, where the initial presentation of this bike seems to be that it is no-compromise. Similarly, platform valve shocks like the Manitou SPV and 5th Element were billed as being best of both worlds. Firm under pedaling loads but supple over the smallest bump. As it turned out, they weren't, and they still forced you to choose between firm pedaling and supple suspension. Now, that revolutionary tech has been abandoned. And that was tech that was already proven in off-road truck and mini bike racing. This R3ACT design doesn't even have that background to support it.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheKaiser View Post
    I love disruptive tech as much or more than anyone, but you have to understand that truly revolutionary designs are a real rarity, while claims about a design being revolutionary are fairly common. Keep in mind that all these same claims were made about VPP when it came out, and while it is a good system, it isn't dramatically better than DW-link, FSR, or even a really well designed single pivot. They all turned out to have compromises, where the initial presentation of this bike seems to be that it is no-compromise. Similarly, platform valve shocks like the Manitou SPV and 5th Element were billed as being best of both worlds. Firm under pedaling loads but supple over the smallest bump. As it turned out, they weren't, and they still forced you to choose between firm pedaling and supple suspension. Now, that revolutionary tech has been abandoned. And that was tech that was already proven in off-road truck and mini bike racing. This R3ACT design doesn't even have that background to support it.
    Nor did Yeti's switch system have any background other than an engineer's design philosophy, yet, that system has become one of the better suspension designs on the market (albeit needing some durability refinement, which they've done over the years).

    I can appreciate people's skepticism, especially in the MTB industry that has seen new standard after new standard introduced... some to prove a good benefit, others not so much.

    Unlikely we'll see the R3ACT design on other bikes, just has with the Switch system, but that doesn't mean it's a bad design...

    I am so excited to ride this bike.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigmike9699 View Post

    Yes, mine is on order... and yes, I splurged for the pro model... and yes, it's going to be f(*king awesome!

    Don't be haters on something you haven't even ridden.
    LOL - ooooohhhhkaaaaay. But kicking down $8K on something you haven't even ridden is toooootalllllly fine.



    But seriously I hope you like it and let us know how it rides.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Procter View Post
    LOL - ooooohhhhkaaaaay. But kicking down $8K on something you haven't even ridden is toooootalllllly fine.
    As do 95% of the mountain biking community who purchase bikes in that price point. You have to rely on A) what the company says about it, B) what reviews say about it, and C) what the shop(s) say about it. There are, unfortunately, very few opportunities to demo bikes...

    Having owned two high end Marins now (a 2016 Attack Trail Pro, and a 2017 Rift Zone Pro) that I've absolutely loved riding, I have faith in Marin's ability to deliver an amazing bike with the Wolf Ridge! "

    Disclaimer, I do ride under Marin's Ambassador program, so while I might be a bit biased, I have ridden TONNES of bikes over the years (yes, I have commitment issues, don't judge me), the Marin's are, honestly, among the most fun bikes I've ridden, and I don't doubt for a second that the Wolf Ridge will be any different.

  19. #19
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    Relatively high chaingrowth and kicback and relatively forward axle path. Leverage ratio is OK for a 160mm bike. Overall you can get similar or better values with more "traditional" designs.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by andrextr View Post
    [
    Relatively high chaingrowth and kicback and relatively forward axle path. Leverage ratio is OK for a 160mm bike. Overall you can get similar or better values with more "traditional" designs.
    So you're basing suspension/bike performance based off that? Again, lets wait until you ride the bike before jumping to conclusions.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by andrextr View Post


    Relatively high chaingrowth and kicback and relatively forward axle path. Leverage ratio is OK for a 160mm bike. Overall you can get similar or better values with more "traditional" designs.
    Except you forgot something. That video is without a rider. With a riders weight on the pedals the slider acts differently. That's the whole purpose of this suspension system. The designers really don't want people figuring out exactly how it works. So, I won't say anymore.

  22. #22
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mountain Cycle Shawn View Post
    Except you forgot something. That video is without a rider. With a riders weight on the pedals the slider acts differently. That's the whole purpose of this suspension system. The designers really don't want people figuring out exactly how it works. So, I won't say anymore.
    Ooooo I wanna know! Is this like Nixon's plan to end the war?!

  24. #24
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    I believe this is the patent is here:

    https://www.google.com/patents/US20140265208

    Figures 8a/b/c seem to describe the Marin/Polygon design. The relevant claims are:


    The present invention solves the above need in the art with a linked suspension system that maintains the instant center of rotation rearward of the front frame of the vehicle. The system is usable on most any type of ground-engaging vehicle to improve the suspension action. Thus, the shocks and springs of the suspension do not have to be as specially designed and tuned to deal with pedal-induced forces, braking forces, rider bob and other inputs. The suspension linkage design itself cancels or counters much of the undesirable, energy and control-robbing movements.

    ...

    The suspension has a slide link coupled to the frame and to the rear arm. The slide link is rotationally fixed to the arm to rotationally move therewith. The slide link is pivotally secured to the frame to rotate relative to the frame.
    ...


    [0080]
    The anti-squat 160 and pro-squat 162 zones for the control arm link are also shown in FIG. 8A. The control arm zones are shown independent of the slider zones. The interplay between the combination of zones can be used to create desired suspension characteristics. The control arm anti-squat zone 160 is created by moving the forward link pivot 100 above the chain tension vector 146 (assuming the rearward link pivot 102 is lower relative to the vector 146. The control arm pro-squat zone 162 is created by moving the forward link pivot down in its mounting location.
    [0081]
    FIG. 8B depicts the resolution of forces with regard to the slider 88 and the chain tension vector. As discussed above, the angles change depending on the front/rear gearing combination and on the amount of suspension compression of the rear triangle relative to the front triangle. The resultant inline force is the amount the slider is pushed into or pulled out of the cylinder to stiffen or soften the suspension. Of course, this is independent of other links and forces. The angle of the slider in the uncompressed and compressed states is shown at 168, 168′. The angles are shown at 124, 126. The chain force is shown at 146 with the perpendicular force of 164 and inline force of 166.


    ========================
    So, best I can tell, what's going on is:

    The slider is a telescopic member which acts to move the instant center of rotation throughout the travel, such that the force of the chain is always exactly perpendicular to the forces being acted on the swingarm by the ground. See figure 8b. The slider might be a spring or a damper, or both - the patent is general on this. I think that Mt Cycle Shawn is hinting, is that rider weight affects the slider travel, so the spring, or dampiness of it, would need to be tuned to the riders weight to maintain the perpendicular relationship.

    But, there might actually be some secret sauce here.

  25. #25
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    When is this magic bike being released?
    Hello, my name is human and I came down from the stars.

  26. #26
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    My pro is apparently here first or second week of August.

    I rode it this weekend. what an amazing bike. Pedals so well. It ramps up quickly int he supension compared to the attack trail, which takes a bit of getting used to, but it was still great. Such a great bike.

  27. #27
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    Cant wait to hear end user opinions on this bike. I rode one at a local demo and it did everything they claim it would. It climbed better than any bike ive ridden in recent memory or was at least on par with my Spider 275c. It handled chunk smooth and controlled. It simoly felt great, except for some odd loss of rear traction around hardpacked corners. It felt like the tire was skipping. Going from traction to no traction then back to traction. Others claimed the rear felt vauge or flexy even. Im hoping it was just a tire pressure or setup issue because i really want to like this bike. FWIW, the tires were WTB Breakouts which I've run recently on my Evil Calling so I'm familiar with their feel.

  28. #28
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    Ok, this bike absolutely rips! Yes, it does everything they say it does. It is such an interesting feel... you pedal and it feels like a quick XC pedaling bike, but is still incredibly active. You can pedal up technical, chunky climbs, and you can feel every pedal stroke moving you forward with efficiency, yet, the bike is so active through the rough climbing! It is truly an amazing feel.

    Descending, the bike descends like a true 160mm bike! The one thing I did notice (especially compared to my Attack Trail) was that it ramped up quite noticeably on bigger hits. Not a negative feeling of performance, just different than what I was expecting in 160mm. That said, it was a very well mannered and controlled bike through all descending terrain that I took it on. It definitely doesn't quite "pop" like my Attack Trail or Rift Zone does, so that will take a bit of getting used to once I get my WR Pro, but this bike rips! I also imagine that with the Float X2 on my Pro, I'll be able to tune the progression more and have more rebound adjustability than the Monarch had on the 8 I rode. Excited to play around with it.

    My Pro will be here mid-August apparently, which I am incredibly stoked about. My WR rides were on the 8, which I found to be an amazingly valued bike! So much so that I contemplated changing my order to the 8 or 9 instead of the Pro... but I am a sucker for vanity (and mild performance improvements).

    Overall, I am super impressed with this bike. Marin not only knows how to spec bikes really well, but they also jump behind technology that actually works (as their quadlink and isotrac bikes have all proven too).

  29. #29
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    I saw this new bike on display at the Sea Otter this year and looking at that rear suspension lower member slide... I couldn't help myself from giggling and calling it the Sex Machine!

  30. #30
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    Any Maverick riders (ha!) who bought one? Curious how R3act is compared to Monolink.

  31. #31
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    So i've had my Pro now for 4 days, and have put 50km on it. Man, this bike is amazing. It does everything they say it does. It pedals as good as my Rift Zone, leaps better than my Attack Trail pedaled, and is a very composed bike on the trails, and through rough chunder.

    It jumps, it corners, and it hauls ass into lines faster than many other bikes I've ridden.

    I'll be taking it to my first enduro this weekend at Sun Peaks Resort.

    The pro is an amazing bike spec wise, but the real value lies in the Wolf Ridge 8! I wouldn't hesitate to purchase a Wolf Ridge 8! You don't need the high end rear suspension because the bike controls itself really well. Plus, the GX Eagle rides really really well with the XX1 providing only slightly crisper shifts.

    Anyways, I'd HIGHLY recommend getting in and ordering a Wolf Ridge 8....

  32. #32
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    Rode the Wolf Ridge Pro at Outerbike in Moab last week. Route was the shuttled ride provided by Outerbike to Mag 7 and back to the event site. Bull Run>Arth's>Little Canyon>Gemini Bridges Rd back to Outerbike HQ across 191. Gold bar rim/Portal weren't really an option b/c no way to get back to the venue other than an epic ride ;-)

    I've ridden bikes with 150mm or more rear suspension since the early 2000's. The Wolf Ridge charges! Amazing efficiency climbing, and the same but with suppleness (?!?!?) on more techy climbs. Easy to loft or float the front of the bike to drop off stuff and plush when you do touch down. Admittedly not the hardest set of trails (or if there were harder options, I was not aware of them.) I came away gushing. Told the reps that they should have a line of people wrapped around the booth waiting to get their hands on that bike. I asked about durability. As others have noted, the links on the side and shock strut are not at all beefy. They said that the main beam is huge and takes the loads. I kept asking, and they said they didn't know about long term durability yet. The bike is simply too new. Seemed like an honest answer to me.

    I did notice upon returning the bike that I seemed to have used all the travel on the rear end based upon the o ring position. Never felt the bike bottom out, but never dropped anything that large either. Possible the ring just shim-shimmied itself down there over the course of the ride.

    Did have some funkiness with the rear thru axle. Seemed tight but was getting some side to side play on the rear wheel. The rear end of the bike did not seem to be the culprit. There was no visible movement on the rear beams when trying to manipulate the the wheel. It was moving independently of the bike's rear end. I tightened the rear axle a touch, and it got a little better but not exactly sure what was going on there.

    E13 Carbon wheels felt incredible. On a side note, and this may be a plus or minus, the rear hub is L-O-U-D!

    This was a stellar, surprising bike to ride. How do I wrap this up? Felt like a 160mm travel rig when I wanted it to, felt like a trail bike or something with a lot less travel when conditions warranted. Craziness! I'd love to get some more saddle time on burlier trails and see how it does, but its an impressive rig.

    Cheers!

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigmike9699 View Post
    So i've had my Pro now for 4 days, and have put 50km on it. Man, this bike is amazing. It does everything they say it does. It pedals as good as my Rift Zone, leaps better than my Attack Trail pedaled, and is a very composed bike on the trails, and through rough chunder.

    It jumps, it corners, and it hauls ass into lines faster than many other bikes I've ridden.

    I'll be taking it to my first enduro this weekend at Sun Peaks Resort.

    The pro is an amazing bike spec wise, but the real value lies in the Wolf Ridge 8! I wouldn't hesitate to purchase a Wolf Ridge 8! You don't need the high end rear suspension because the bike controls itself really well. Plus, the GX Eagle rides really really well with the XX1 providing only slightly crisper shifts.

    Anyways, I'd HIGHLY recommend getting in and ordering a Wolf Ridge 8....
    I didnít see the ďnot for bike parksĒ message that I saw on their web site pages for the Wolf Ridge months ago for...Would you hesitate riding it at any bike park?

    Will a 2.5 tire fit in the rear?

    Just curious, what height/weight and what frame size you are riding?

    Now that you have ridden it more, would you add anything to your review?
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  34. #34
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    Well, somehow I won a large brand new Wolf Ridge Pro for $4500 + shipping on eBay...so I guess Iím going to find out for myself.

    Iíd rather get a medium, but I didnít think I would get a new $8600 bike for $4500 and that I was the only one to bid on it.

    Maybe everyone was watching The Walking Dead when it ended...
    Ď18 Marin Wolf Ridge Pro
    '17 Specialized E29 S-Works
    '15 Canfield Riot
    '13 Banshee Prime (29+)
    '12 LenzSport PBJ

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by jbsocal View Post
    I didnít see the ďnot for bike parksĒ message that I saw on their web site pages for the Wolf Ridge months ago for...Would you hesitate riding it at any bike park?

    Will a 2.5 tire fit in the rear?

    Just curious, what height/weight and what frame size you are riding?

    Now that you have ridden it more, would you add anything to your review?
    I have used it in an Enduro that was at Sun Peaks resort here in BC. It handled it amazing! We were on various black and double black trails through out the mountain. At the end of each day, I had to use the air bleed (and yes, I did hear a brief 'hiss', so the system works), but never noticed any performance degradation at all. I have no hesitation taking this bike into big terrain, bike park or not.

    Now that I've had it for over 2 months, this bike continues to blow me away. I can hammer any XC route (albeit slower than an XC bike of course), but then point it down into gnarly janky terrain. It's a super well composed bike. At this point, I just do NOT want to ride anything else... it's too much fun.

    I did swap out the KS post for a Fox Transfer, but that is a personal preference more than anything else.

    I think a 2.5 would fit, depending on the tire. I now have a 2.35 E13 TRS tire in there that fits with more than enough room, and looks to be wider than my Minion DHF 2.5 up front. I'm tempted to try a 29+ in the front after reading the good review of the tire size on NSMB who had it on the Wolf Ridge Pro. Not sure it'd squeeze into the back, though I'd be tempted to try heh heh.

    I'm 5'9, 170lbs, and am riding a medium with 25% sag. For enduros or big mountain days, I bump it up to 30%. I've got about 5 clicks of low speed compression, and maybe 3 or 4 clicks of low speed rebound. Beyond that, the bike handles the high speed stuff very well, and I haven't felt the need to adjust the high speed settings at all.

    what's your set-up?

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by bigmike9699 View Post
    I have used it in an Enduro that was at Sun Peaks resort here in BC. It handled it amazing! We were on various black and double black trails through out the mountain. At the end of each day, I had to use the air bleed (and yes, I did hear a brief 'hiss', so the system works), but never noticed any performance degradation at all. I have no hesitation taking this bike into big terrain, bike park or not.

    Now that I've had it for over 2 months, this bike continues to blow me away. I can hammer any XC route (albeit slower than an XC bike of course), but then point it down into gnarly janky terrain. It's a super well composed bike. At this point, I just do NOT want to ride anything else... it's too much fun.

    I did swap out the KS post for a Fox Transfer, but that is a personal preference more than anything else.

    I think a 2.5 would fit, depending on the tire. I now have a 2.35 E13 TRS tire in there that fits with more than enough room, and looks to be wider than my Minion DHF 2.5 up front. I'm tempted to try a 29+ in the front after reading the good review of the tire size on NSMB who had it on the Wolf Ridge Pro. Not sure it'd squeeze into the back, though I'd be tempted to try heh heh.

    I'm 5'9, 170lbs, and am riding a medium with 25% sag. For enduros or big mountain days, I bump it up to 30%. I've got about 5 clicks of low speed compression, and maybe 3 or 4 clicks of low speed rebound. Beyond that, the bike handles the high speed stuff very well, and I haven't felt the need to adjust the high speed settings at all.

    what's your set-up?
    I only have less than two hours on mine...still adjusting the cockpit.

    Call me crazy, but Iím a tad shorter than you on a large...lost about 20 lbs but still around 220 suited up.

    I want the bars higher...might try 165 GXP cranks.

    Youíre the second medium Wolf Ridge Pro owner that has told me that they swapped to a Transfer...the other person told me she preferred it without the offset...less rub...sounds like I should try it.

    On my medium Enduro 29, I swapped the Transfer with a Fall Line with the offset...on that bike, I really prefer the offset.

    Did you measure that rear tire width compared to the front? Could you? I think that fork makes the DHF 2.5 look small.

    I ended up putting a 2.4 DHR II WT on the rear and a DHF 2.5 WT on the front, but now I wish I would have put the DHF 2.5 WT on the rear and a DHF 3.0 on the front.

    I have DHF 3.0ís (with Procore) on my Prime, they barely fit...especially in the MRP Stage (it was the only fork I had that it would fit in).

    What are you air bleeding?

    Iím missing one of the small rubber ďcapsĒ on the right side of the rear swing arm, have you had any come off?

    Thanks.
    Ď18 Marin Wolf Ridge Pro
    '17 Specialized E29 S-Works
    '15 Canfield Riot
    '13 Banshee Prime (29+)
    '12 LenzSport PBJ

  37. #37
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    I didnít realize that the red button on the right rear swing arm is the pressure release valve you were pressing to bleed...so Iím not missing any cap.

    I donít recall that being mentioned in the reviews...bike manual seems generic.
    Last edited by jbsocal; 1 Week Ago at 08:35 PM.

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by 127.0.0.1 View Post
    Great, thorough review! Bike Radar consistently puts together great reviews! I'm just gonna add some thoughts based on my three months aboard a Wolf Ridge Pro here in the interior of British Columbia.

    First, I think it's a bit unfortunate that they started the review with what amounted to a broken bike. I felt from the video that it really jaded their review, even after receiving the updated/unbroken bike. I have not personally experienced the flex in the rear end that they complained about. Granted, I'm not riding a broken bike.

    I have done a tonne of very steep, technical climbing on mine, and have not experienced the challenges they found in pedalling over obstacles. Granted, I am on the Float X2, and have added a bit of low speed rebound compression, so maybe that's the key... slowing the rebound a little bit.

    I also have not experienced the 'tourquing' they referred to in the suspension. Yes, under hard braking over rough terrain, the suspension packs in, but that's largely a side effect of an inherently single pivot designs (as this is). I found the same thing aboard the Yeti switch system. The trade off is a bike that remains plush and progressive through it's travel, but very positive when pedalling. If anything, it reminds me I need to brake less... or be more disciplined in how and where I'm braking.

    Geometry wise, it also works. I have owned an Attack Trail Pro, a Rift Zone Pro, and now the Wolf Ridge Pro. What all three shared was predictable, neutral geometry. They aren't the slackest, they aren't the steepest, but it's predictable, and consistent. No, it's not nearly as slack, or as long as some of the other long travel 29ers out there, but you're also not going to find any of those others (except for maybe the SB5.5) to be as well rounded.

    I love the bike for the fact that I can be descending technical terrain (comfortably) and then punch up a technical climb immediately afterwards (as a plethora of which exists here in BC) without having to reach for a lockout, or worrying about all the efficiency lost by not having the lockout engaged because I didn't have time to safely switch it on.

    This bike does exactly what Marin says it does, and all I can say is please don't let this review cloud your interest in the bike, because it truly is an amazing, well balanced, FUN (!!!!) bike!

  40. #40
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    Iím far from being an expert rider...but so far I also have not noticed any of the issues mentioned in that review on my Pro.

    Iím wondering how the ride changes if pressure builds up in the slider and you donít press the button to release it.

    I have not taken it to higher elevations yet (such as Lake Arrowhead or Big Bear) and there has been no pressure build up on mine yet.
    Ď18 Marin Wolf Ridge Pro
    '17 Specialized E29 S-Works
    '15 Canfield Riot
    '13 Banshee Prime (29+)
    '12 LenzSport PBJ

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