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  1. #1
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    Just won a bid for 2010 Mount Vision 5.7 L

    It's a demo unit. I have not ridden one. I simply read reviews and know that it accepts 650b conversion. I almost went 29'er, hence the 650b requirement.

    Funny, I spent the same amount on a used Titus RacerX almost 10 years ago. Under $1500! The RX has those old Magura hydros and a WB SC90 fork. Ouch! Still, it has been a great 1st MB.

    I'd like to know about users favorite tweaks and mods, i.e. Push re-valve fork and shock, stem length.
    I'm just shy of 5-11, arms and legs on the shorter side, weigh aboot 205.

    I'm leaving the RX stiff XC feel behind, not so much for AM hucking. It's about carpal issues and the RX is not my friend on fire roads and descents. I guess being 48 is a factor too.
    So my usual trails in SoCal have no big drops or serious DH'ing. This should allow me to use a set-up for 6 inch plushness? Will settings get me there?

    TIA for any tips and tricks.

  2. #2
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    Not sure how you'll get 6" of suspension out of a 2010 MV given that it is ~4.7" of travel stock, but I am curious to know how you do it if you do. What fork would you run?

    I highly recommend the Maxle 12mm axle and dropout kit. It requires a new hub which is a PITA. I found a used Wolf Ridge wheel with a Sun Ringle Jumping Flea hub, and you can actually buy those new on the web (Mavic EN321 and Sun Ringle hub, laced and ready to roll) for pretty cheap, and actually less than what I paid for my used one, but oh well. Anyway, this makes the already competent back end even more rigid in the turns and climbs.

    The other thing I did is upgrade the front rotor (and caliper hanger) to 7". I may do the same on the rear at some point. The 6" brakes work just fine, but the 7" is a very welcome addition once you have it espeically if you're hitting any steep stuff, or if you are a larger individual. I'm aroud 195 lbs most days.

    I upgraded to a XT front derailleur only because a LBS had one on a bargain table for cheap. Silly reason, but it does actually work better than the Deore it replaced.

    I am about to convert to 24/36 and a bash guard for the front gears. I will likely never spin the 44T ring. I already have a 11/32 cassette from the wheel swap, but plan to put the 11/34 back on. I think this will help a lot.

    I also converted to tubeless using the stock rims, 20" BMX tubes and Stan's. There is a lot of traction with this setup.

    Congrats on the new ride. I have been very happy with my 2009 MV 5.7. I will watch with interest should you post up your updates, and conversion to 650b if or when you do that.
    "This is my favorite section...watch your step..."

  3. #3
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    Yeah crawler, I'm simply hoping I can dial in the initial plushness of a 6" via settings.
    Maxle would be wise with a move to 650b. I've been pondering the big ring usefulness meself.
    Last edited by socalscott; 11-22-2010 at 05:33 PM.

  4. #4
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    120mm travel you are NOT going to get 160mm of travel.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flboy
    120mm travel you are NOT going to get 160mm of travel.
    Plushness, you are NOT going to get the point of settings for INITIAL plushness.

  6. #6
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    ridden a MV for a year now...

    I'm curious about the 650b thing about now, so I can quell my 29'er lust at a fraction of the price.

    I'll say this about the MV: Plush it is NOT. Any 1-3 foot drops, which is perfectly acceptable on a 120mm bike, feels like you land on a hard tail. The control over bumps, rocks stuff is good, but it's a rough ride on the nasty rocks stuff, because it's only 20mm more than a cross country bike.

    It's a great bike, it bobs, it climbs really well, and is fun as hell going down hill. You will feel the trail underneath you, and you will like the bike.

  7. #7
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    I have completely the opposite view pulpwoody! I think the MV is a very smooth riding bike for 120mm of travel, in fact I fitted mine with a 140mm fork and the "feel" of the suspension is very balanced now (handling skewed towards dh though!) Set the sag, select a stem length that suits your riding style and you should be comfy in the cockpit. I'm only a little taller than you and I'm using a 60mm stem, I could run a 90mm and be comfy so I wouldn't recommend a stem outside these lengths and plan on about 10-20mm shorter than you think you need as the nice short headtube lets you climb without the front lifting and a short stem makes it feel better on the DH.
    Coming off a true xc platform you will probably notice the soft feel at the pedals, and bob in 22t even with propedal on. I think if I had the legs for it I would run a single 32 on the front, I currently use 24/36 and will stretch to 26/39 when funds permit. It really does pedal much better with a slightly larger granny, and with time you learn to build momentum a little slower and slow down for nothing!

  8. #8
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    You know, the bigger fork up front isn't a bad idea, and I've never thought of that. I do think that I run through the 120mm up front pretty darn fast.

    Social, keep us posted on the 650b's with the MV okay?

  9. #9
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    l did the same kind of thing with a Wolf Ridge...

    the stock fork was 140mm.. l put a 150mm fork on it... the change made the bike feel more balanced even though the actual travel difference was only 10mm. all in all, the 150mm fork also had a slightly taller axle to crown.

    --- l have been selling and riding Marin Quakes since 2006 when they first came out -- fantastic bike... l feel that frame is well suited for the 180mm fork even though many of the older models were spec'd with 160mm forks. Sometimes the folks dealing with the companies they spec their bikes with don't make perfect choices. dare to be different, take the road less traveled (pun intended).
    Last edited by Pedal Shop; 01-03-2011 at 04:55 AM.
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  10. #10
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    I agree with weedkilla1, my 2009 MV is very plush, especially compared to my previous XC setup. What sag are you guys running? I lean more towards the AM side of riding and at 30% sag the MV definitely feels like it could use a bigger fork up front.

  11. #11
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    Here's something interesting I've noticed about this bike. I've known for a while that this bike is best when you are seated, either sitting, or descending, but recently, I've started riding flat pedals. Riding the flats has shifted my weight back a little bit so I can maintain better pressure with the pedals while I'm descending, and I think this has "softened" up the bike for me. I've noticed the suspension feeling softer since I started riding flats.

    Anyway, the 140 up front sounds great, but that's just one MORE thing to get! I'm still curious to hear a 650 ride report.

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