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  1. #1
    Pauly
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    How much better could the new hardtails be?

    I have a 10 year old Lightspeed Obed that weighs 23 lbs and I love it. The forks aren't 10 years old though (Blue SIDs), and it has a 9 speed cassette just like the latest and most popular bikes.

    So, am I missing anything by not having a more modern hardtail? Everybody talks about their bikes like they are cutting edge technology. I have never felt the need for disc brakes and I consider myself a pretty good descender, How can people get so excited about a non-titanium hardtail frame. Am I missing something?

  2. #2
    banned
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    No Mr. Wood

    Quote Originally Posted by Pauly Sportinwood
    I have a 10 year old Lightspeed Obed that weighs 23 lbs and I love it. The forks aren't 10 years old though (Blue SIDs), and it has a 9 speed cassette just like the latest and most popular bikes.

    So, am I missing anything by not having a more modern hardtail? Everybody talks about their bikes like they are cutting edge technology. I have never felt the need for disc brakes and I consider myself a pretty good descender, How can people get so excited about a non-titanium hardtail frame. Am I missing something?
    you are missing nothing. The bicycle really hasn't been re-invented. A basic classic hardtail in capable hands is as good as anything.

  3. #3
    i don't give a shift
    Reputation: collideous's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pauly Sportinwood
    How can people get so excited about a non-titanium hardtail frame. Am I missing something?
    Maybe they weren't around 10 years ago. I have a 12 year old Merlin that continuously evolved during all those years and it's still an awesome bike. It might have a tough time now to battle for pole position under my butt because its competitor sports 29 inch wheels.

    As long as you love riding the Litespeed there's no reason to ride the <marketing hype>"latest and greatest"</marketing hype>.
    blogging at 29in.ch

  4. #4
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    Everyone is right. There's no reason to switch to a newer Litespeed if your happy with what you have. It's not like Ti goes bad over time.

    However, Litespeed does make an effort to improve their geometry and their tube shapes to make a better performing bike. They don't just stick to a simple plan year after year. Herbert would be the expert here, but I wouldn't doubt if the new Obed has a different set of tubes and a lower weight compared to a bike from 10 years ago. Would I beable to tell the difference ? Probably not.

    I have a 2002 Siena that I would never get rid of.... and a Niota AL that will someday become Niota Ti. But I do feel that the 2007 Siena is an upgrade over the 2002 Siena. Yet, I would never hang the 2002 frame up and still plan to race on it this year. And a better performing 2007 Siena frame wouldn't make me into a faster racer, anyway. A half pound lighter frame won't help me with the 10 pounds I'll gain over x-mas.

  5. #5
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    i won't say you're missing nothing, but most advancement/development would be in the full sus department, so for a hardtail there aint too much to play around with. yet there have been changes that may or may not mean alot depending on the rider.

    Lsiena0206 (god,it's a biatch to spell your nick lol) made a good point regarding the continual improvement of new models. every manufacturer has to tweak/refine their stuff to keep ppl interested/or to keep up with the competitors and i think the main development for hardtails these years has to be weight and material,namely carbon. say take the scott scale for example, it's a full carbon frame weighing less than a kilo! a typical straight-gauge 3/2.5 ti frame will usually be around 1.6kg. also litespeed came up with G.E.T, a series of specially shaped tubes to make their frames, as well as using 6/4 ti. much lighter/stronger/stiffer , remember the recent tanasi? other things like hydroforming, mono-stays, carbon seat stays, carbon rear(eg ellsworth enlightenment), full monocoque carbon (eg giant, scott etc), reynolds 953, scandium, magnesium, alu butted,double-butted,triple butted....the list goes on. so somehow within the constrains of the classic hardtail with quite a typical geometry, makers are still tweaking it however they can. so to a racer, a frame with the right material/stiffness/weight can mean a podium finish .

    combined with the continual improvement in bike components, i can say that the a bike built today definitely rides differently.as for your Obed,since you said the components are new, i guess your comparison is mainly between a 10yr frame and one today. but nonetheless, a 10 yr old obed at 23lbs sounds sweet enough! though i think disc-brakes will be a good choice, 90% of mtbikers can't be wrong!

    still the best way to find out is to take the latest, flashiest exotic carbon hardtail for a test-ride and decide if you've missed anything. fwiw i also ride a ti hardtail with V-brakes...

  6. #6
    German dude
    Reputation: Herbert's Avatar
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    I think there are many good responses here and it sounds like your bike is set up well for what you currently want and need.
    Big difference between your Obed and the current Obed is actually mostly about the geometry and allowing you to use a 120mm fork and disc brakes. The tube shapes are more advanced aswell, mostly in the chainstay/seatstay area. The Ocoee on the otherhand is a cross country race hardtail like your Obed and is optimized at 80mm of travel and is set up for disc. The tube shape differences there are massive (similar to what we have done to the new Siena) and thus the Ocoee will be a much stiffer bike.

    Both the Obed and Ocoee have modular dropouts and allow the user to eventually swap them out for optional after market singlespeed dropouts.

    Hope this makes sense.

    Herbert
    Litespeed
    www.litespeed.com

  7. #7
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    I have an 8 years old Litespeed 21.7 lbs. Obed with blue SID SL and XTR Vbrakes, I still ride it weekly on flat trails but I ride my full suspension bike on steep/rocky trails, I won't buy another Ti hardtail but love to get a Litespeed Ti road bike.

    I think Litespeed made nice Ti hardtails but somehow they missed the FS Ti mtb market.



    My 2cents.

  8. #8
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    THe Technology and mentioned that would be a big one for me is replacable drop outs. The bikes can how have horizontal or vertical drops so you can now have a SS or a geared bike. The only other big change for me would be the disk brake mounting but this means its time for new wheels, brakes and several other parts. The tube shaping is just pure art. If you haven't seen it stop by your LBS that has an one in stock.

    You know i used to think the same thing about FS Ti with Litespeed until I rode a Sewanee. It is a very plush well responding bike and with the Merlin works 4.0 for more travel I think they have it covered. They could use to have a longer travel bike still but I think what they have between the 4.0 and the Sewanee is some real quality.

  9. #9
    You wanna go ridin?
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    Part of the reason that I buy Ti is so I will never have to buy again-just replace/upgrade components as needed. My Dean Colonel is 7 years old and I still get a semi when I look at her. This is also the reason when I bought a rode bike instead of buying new I bought a used Solano frame without thinking twice.

    Asahi has a point with the replaceable derailluer hangers and disc brake mounts etc.

  10. #10
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    If you love your bike--- keep it !!!

    I own an eleven year old Merlin XLM and I up grade worn out parts but I still love the response of a light weight bike and the geometry and feel of titianium on single-track. The merlin decals are mostly gone and it's matt finish looks closer to chrome now because of sand and dirt polishing the frame for the past 11 years.
    I have ridden my wife's Yeti ASR and it's fun on rocky desents but my bike is much more maintenance free.

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