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  1. #26
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    This light,(Halo) I believe will be for a limited select group. One, it looks like it was designed to be your only light,, and as we know despite quality any light system can fail. Two,, this puts anyone interested in the Halo in an expensive dilemma,, needing a bar light with enough power to compete. Something like the NR Pro3600,, or Lupine Betty-R or even the Full Beam Night Nemesis are three of a select few. And of coarse this will bring costs in the 2K range.
    I think the Halo could work well with any of the bar lights mentioned but only if there is enough adjustability on lamp head angles. Have your bar light angled down a bit so to light up the first 25/30 yards and have the Halo angled upwards enough to light up anything further down the road. This should still provide enough shadowing from your bar light to react to obstacles at fast speeds. That been said, it is going against what I believe as the better set up for me,,, higher power on the bars with a flood beam, and spottier beam on the lid.

    Two features I would liked to see in a set up of this price is a wireless remote since it is a designated helmet light, and a (Glare Mode)on the UI, shutting down the four outer emitters on either side giving the user 1200 usable lumens using just the two inner most leds. I think this would be the only resolution when experiencing glare from fog, or riding through a due point and bugs of coarse.

    It would be nice to get a little more information on the UI and where the switch is located.
    Last edited by indebt; 11-23-2013 at 02:11 PM.

  2. #27
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    Switch is mounted top center of the light making it very easy to reach from either hand. Wireless is in the planning stage as we believe that will be the future. UI can be programmed to a lower level brightness for increased runtimes or different conditions if desired.

    Thanks

  3. #28
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    I want an option to wear it under my face for an epic light-beard

  4. #29
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    I think they are missing the boat here a little - a light-bar that mounts below your bar, with maybe the two end-lights aimed off 15-20 degrees to the side, with 4 or so aiming straight ahead would be awesome! For me, a helmet light is usually only really "used" for lower-speed tight turns, switchbacks, or fixing something on someone's bike! 500-800 or so lumens is plenty.
    R.I.P. Corky 10/97-4/09
    Disclaimer: I sell and repair bikes for a living
    http://www.endlesscyclesonline.com

  5. #30
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    I for one love the innovation. I give them credit for pushing the lumens higher. Sorry but I still feel more lumens is better. To say 500-800 lumens is enough is just silly. I ride rocky terrain in complete darkness at full speed and solo a lot of times with my two Lupine Betty's. I say bring on more lumens.

  6. #31
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    Bar V Helmet

    I wanted to give our philosophy behind a super bright helmet light vs. a super bright bar light. Riding trails at speed at night is all about shadow definition and feature recognition. The higher the angle of attack the more defined the shadow is, making it easier for our eyes and brains to calculate height and distance. If you take a moment to think about this it makes sense as stadium lights for sporting events and the sun itself work in this way. Putting a very bright light on the bars makes shadows long and flat much like the angle of the sun at twilight or sunrise. Which leads to the problem of flat light and flattened trail features. By moving the brightest source of light to a higher angle the shadows more closely resemble optimum daylight lighting conditions.

    Yes Trail LED lights can and do function as stand alone lights due to MPSD, but we also understand that even though we practice and promote KISS engineering things do fail and usually at the worst time, so a second light mounted on the bar for fill or emergency use is never a bad idea. Does it need to be able to compete with the Halo? In short no. While we would love to have everybody buy a Halo and DS combo we too are realistic (sometimes) so get a bar light that will allow you to get out, or limp home in case the worst happens.

    In our experience as riders up until now though, it has been impractical due to size, weight, or form factor to effectively mount a super bright light on your helmet so the tradition of a brighter bar light persists.
    While this can and is a boxers vs. briefs debate as some riders will always prefer one over another for comfort. I wanted everyone to understand our design philosophy and reasoning for creating the brightest helmet mounted light on the market.

    Thanks
    and overshare warning,

    I prefer boxers when it isn't a chami

  7. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bronsondude View Post
    I for one love the innovation. I give them credit for pushing the lumens higher. Sorry but I still feel more lumens is better. To say 500-800 lumens is enough is just silly. I ride rocky terrain in complete darkness at full speed and solo a lot of times with my two Lupine Betty's. I say bring on more lumens.
    I agree. As they say in the auto/engine industry - "there is no replacement for displacement".

  8. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bronsondude View Post
    I for one love the innovation. I give them credit for pushing the lumens higher. Sorry but I still feel more lumens is better. To say 500-800 lumens is enough is just silly. I ride rocky terrain in complete darkness at full speed and solo a lot of times with my two Lupine Betty's. I say bring on more lumens.
    I think I was mis-understood - I only meant that 500-800 on top of my helmet was plenty... I still want lights on my bar that will ignite the brush as I pass by!!!
    R.I.P. Corky 10/97-4/09
    Disclaimer: I sell and repair bikes for a living
    http://www.endlesscyclesonline.com

  9. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by zen bicycle View Post
    The higher the angle of attack the more defined the shadow is, making it easier for our eyes and brains to calculate height and distance. If you take a moment to think about this it makes sense as stadium lights for sporting events and the sun itself work in this way. Putting a very bright light on the bars makes shadows long and flat much like the angle of the sun at twilight or sunrise. Which leads to the problem of flat light and flattened trail features. By moving the brightest source of light to a higher angle the shadows more closely resemble optimum daylight lighting conditions.
    This rationale does not make sense. Used alone, a helmet-mounted light "flattens" the visual field, essentially converting it into a two dimensional perception. This occurs because the light source and our eyes are nearly coincident, thus "hiding" any shadows directly behind the illuminated objects (e.g., rocks, ruts). In order to see these shadows--and consequently the "texture" of the trail--the light source needs to be FARTHER away from our eyes. I've experimented with mounting various brands of lights both on my helmet and on the bar and it has been obvious that bar-mounted lights do a MUCH better job of revealing the three dimensional nature of the trail surface.

  10. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by zen bicycle View Post
    I wanted to give our philosophy behind a super bright helmet light vs. a super bright bar light. Riding trails at speed at night is all about shadow definition and feature recognition. The higher the angle of attack the more defined the shadow is, making it easier for our eyes and brains to calculate height and distance. If you take a moment to think about this it makes sense as stadium lights for sporting events and the sun itself work in this way. Putting a very bright light on the bars makes shadows long and flat much like the angle of the sun at twilight or sunrise. Which leads to the problem of flat light and flattened trail features. By moving the brightest source of light to a higher angle the shadows more closely resemble optimum daylight lighting conditions.

    Yes Trail LED lights can and do function as stand alone lights due to MPSD, but we also understand that even though we practice and promote KISS engineering things do fail and usually at the worst time, so a second light mounted on the bar for fill or emergency use is never a bad idea. Does it need to be able to compete with the Halo? In short no. While we would love to have everybody buy a Halo and DS combo we too are realistic (sometimes) so get a bar light that will allow you to get out, or limp home in case the worst happens.

    In our experience as riders up until now though, it has been impractical due to size, weight, or form factor to effectively mount a super bright light on your helmet so the tradition of a brighter bar light persists.
    While this can and is a boxers vs. briefs debate as some riders will always prefer one over another for comfort. I wanted everyone to understand our design philosophy and reasoning for creating the brightest helmet mounted light on the market.

    Thanks
    and overshare warning,

    I prefer boxers when it isn't a chami
    Like the previous poster I'm not sure I can agree with your point of view. The example of "Stadium lights" is not a good one because stadium lights completely surround the venue with 360 of light. As such there is little lack of depth perception because in a stadium everything is illuminated from roughly a 360 angle.

    In contrast, with ( the Halo ) being so close to your eyes and the fact that it is also a HIGH POWERED multi-projection light source, to me I figure this should translate over to almost *a complete wash-out of trail features once you start looking at features that are closer in to the bike. ( *assuming a 6000 lumen output )

    Now just to be fair this effect can happen with other helmet lamps as well if they are very bright, aimed closer to the bike and using a very confined beam pattern. While this can be a problem when using helmet lamps if the lamp beam pattern is in fact very confined and used mostly to illuminate terrain beyond 100ft there shouldn't be too much of a problem. In "real world" use though the helmet lamp is going to point anywhere the rider points his head. At times that means the majority of the light will be much closer to the bike as the rider tries to negotiate around technical terrain.

    The trick to successfully using a helmet lamp is to be using the appropriate brightness level / beam pattern to suit the given line of sight distance and terrain that you are riding at any given moment.
    This of course is more easily said than done. In my opinion having a good flood bar light makes this a bit easier as most times you won't have to point the helmet lamp so close to the bike ( as you attempt to negotiate a sharp turn ).

    Now with everything I just said I also think that a lamp like the Halo can be useful as long as the user doesn't point the full intensity of the lamp too close to the bike. Whither this is going to be possible in real world application is any one's guess. For a lamp like the Halo a wireless remote would be the perfect add-on feature to allow the user to make "instant up-down mode changes". Add a programmable feature to that and you might sell more of these.

    I've love to demo the 3-up version but would definitely pass at the full output of the Halo. For the type of riding I do it really wouldn't suit me.

  11. #36
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    Last night I rode with bar lighs for the first time in many years (the Cateye Volt 1200 and the L&M Tazz 1200). I found them to be pretty useless on the road or any extra wide trail or in any area where there is additional lighting (street lamps, homes, shops, etc.). On the single-track they were better, but did not light up the trails nearly as much as my Gloworm X2 v2 at MED (about 900 lumens I think) on my helmet. I'm so underwhelmed by the bar lights that I think I will return them both. I've been riding only with the X2 (and a backup Niterider Minewt 600 on the bar in case of my main light fails) the past year and most of the time at MED and find I have sufficient illumination 90% of the time (I run at LOW when climbing). Anything above 18 mph I feel the light to be a bit insufficient but that only happens on fast road sections or decents.

    So for me a bar mounted light does not seem to add much. If I do decide to add one again, I would look or 2000+ lumens but in all reality prefer the light on the lid. I find 900 lumens on the lid to be more effective than 1200 lumens on the bar.

  12. #37
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    I think the bar vs. helmet debate is a bit misleading - I think that you need BOTH. A bar light to throw shadows and a helmet light to look around corners/ spot bears hiding in the woods. I've ridden with a helmet light only from ~2000 to 2010 or so and just about managed on the smooth single track I used to ride, but riding "loose" so that I wouldn't get knocked around by stuff I couldn't see. Then I came to central PA and crashed pretty much every night ride in rock gardens. In fact, most of the trails here are just long rock gardens.

    Then I built a bar light and everything changed. I could see lines through rock gardens which I couldn't see before and it actually became easier at night because of those shadows. It's also not the amount of light either - I get the same benefit using my commuter lights (~500lm each) or my dedicated night riding lights (~1200lm helmet, 2000lm bar, both theoretical values). I've ridden with one or the other alone, from lending one out to people I ride with when theirs run out or get left at home, and I really don't care for it.

    However, that's very much a trail type centric view. On smooth buff trails, especially twisty ones, a helmet light might be all that you need. I certainly managed with just that for years. On the stuff around here, just a helmet light would be a nightmare.

    As for the light in question, I think it's cool that people are pushing the limits of what's possible and the machine work looks awesome. I'm not much impressed with the mounting though as getting the angle right looks like it'll be a hassle and very much a helmet specific one at that.

  13. #38
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    I see this Halo light being used in the film industry. all sorts of applications.

    for actual riding a bike, not so much. for lighting up a scene, hundreds of uses

  14. #39
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    Hmmm the pack might be something about 16Ah or more @ 7.4V comparing it with my lightmalls 7 led thing that eats about 32-36W. Lipo or 26650/32600 Li-ion. Just guessing from the weight posted.

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