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  1. #1
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    Review: Xeccon Spiker 1206

    I have recieved a Xeccon Spiker 1206 light. I will be doing a review of this light, but first here is some important disclosure.

    The Spiker 1206 package was sent to me free of charge for review of this product. I have no direct affliliation with the company except for the fact that I have done a previous review for another light made by Xeccon. This will be an unbias review reflecting the performance of the product good or bad.

    Leonard from Magicshine Australia now in joint with mtbRevolution sent me the Xeccon Spiker 1206 . It is a new concept in light where it has a light sensing mode. The light has a XML U2 Led. The power source is a 4400 mah battery which they tested to run the light for 3h58m. It came with the accessories listed in their website such as the extension cable, Swivel Flex mount, and Oring, battery pouch, and charger. The unit have several choices of color to choose from: black, blue, red and grey.

    Here are some picutres of the package, There will be more to follow including lumens test, battery runtime, beamshot and many more.





    A sideview of the lighthead:


    Picture of the top view (notice that is where the power button is located):


    Bottom view:


    Front view:


    Backview where the light sensor is located:


    And just for size comparison, here is a side by side with the Spiker 1206 next to a Magicshine 808E XML


    Weight of the lighthead and battery:




    [edited correction for T6 to U2]
    [edited Aug 21 for added picture of the battery and lighthead weight.
    Last edited by colleen c; 08-21-2012 at 04:04 PM.

  2. #2
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    Thanks for the nice pics Colleen. I need to jump in quickly to say the "Patant NO"
    engraving typo has been addressed. We've sent that guy back to school.

    The Spiker 1206 is standard with XM-L U2. You should have the sample in Pure White tint.

    Leonard
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Xeccon View Post
    Thanks for the nice pics Colleen. I need to jump in quickly to say the "Patant NO"
    engraving typo has been addressed. We've sent that guy back to school.

    The Spiker 1206 is standard with XM-L U2. You should have the sample in Pure White tint.

    Leonard
    Old school typo? That's OK, my spelling is not so great as many has noticed

    Thanks for pointing out the U2. My bad when I misread the spec. Correction made.

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    I took a lumen test with my home madeDIY sphere. I checked the current correction factor and it had a 21.4 value. So whatever reading I got from my lux meter, I just divide that number by the correction factor to get lumens. This is a relative value and by no means 100% accurate, but instead it is great for comparing lights of known value with lights that are being tested or the difference of total lumination from two lights.

    Since this was an XML U2 led, I was hoping to get into the 800 lumens range. Instead what I did get was a total value of 700 lumens on high mode and 398 lumens on low mode. This was taken within 10 seconds of powering up. It remain steady at this output even after 1 minute so there was pretty much some consistency as the Led warmed up. I wanted to be sure that the 700 lumens I recorded was a value that was legit by taken an amp reading off the battery. The amp draw with a current meter inline with the power cord read 1.13 amps. I also took another current reading measuring the Vdrop across a 0.5 ohm resister inline and that drop was 53.2mv thus yeilding a 1.064 amp draw.

    This current reading was consistent with the reported runtime of almost 4hrs from their website. Personally, I feel that the driver can probably push the LED a little harder to get more lumens but OTOH, that will also mean less efficiency, higher loss from heat and less runtime. Is it worth it for possibly 50 to 100 more lumens? Dunno.

    I also test the Magicshine XML 808E at the same time to see how the 1206 compare the result was very close. The 808E XML came back with 706 lumens. The initial lumens was higher (almost 750) during the first 15 seconds but dropped off rapidly and settle after about an minute.

    Picture of the sphere test of the 1206 can be found in this link:
    http://i1127.photobucket.com/albums/...g/DSCN2580.jpg

    The range of the meter was set at X10.
    Picture of the sphere test with 808e as a comparison can be found here:
    http://i1127.photobucket.com/albums/...g/DSCN2582.jpg

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    Also worth noting the 808E with T6 has a consistent runtime of 3 hours 15 mins with a 4400mAh battery. The 1206 has an approximately additional 43 minute runtime advantage at what's pretty similar lumen output. If the market wants Xeccon to drive it harder we may. It's a case of take from Peter give to Paul. I guess at the end of the day it's about balance.

    Just a suggestion, Colleen. Be interesting to compare operating temperature test side by side.
    Leonard - All things Xeccon + Beyond
    mtbRevolution.com

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    The light sensor concept is going to start to show up more and more. I first saw this concept back at the beginning of the year with the Petzl Nao headlamp that is now currently available.

    NAO | Petzl

    Yes I know I am "comparing" a head lamp to a bike lamp. It is more of a representation to the concept of reactive lighting.

    Thx

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    so how's the light sensor supposed to work - more light the darker it gets or just an on/off? What about commuters who want a bright "to be seen" light for the road? What's the threshold for the light sensor controlling the light - full sunlight/ mid day shade/ twilight/ complete darkness?

    It's an interesting idea, but the devil's in the details as they say

    I also can't tell from the photos - is the battery a standard 4 cell (2S2P) battery? I'm surprised that the capacity isn't higher - 4400mAh packs (2200mAh cells) were commonplace a couple of years ago and battery tech has moved on considerably since then. Panasonic even have a 3400mAh cell out now (as do Sanyo and Samsung I believe) and their 2600-2900mAh cells are much more affordable now.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cue003 View Post
    The light sensor concept is going to start to show up more and more. I first saw this concept back at the beginning of the year with the Petzl Nao headlamp that is now currently available.

    NAO | Petzl

    Yes I know I am "comparing" a head lamp to a bike lamp. It is more of a representation to the concept of reactive lighting.

    Thx
    Yes indeed it is an interesting concept. I will say that for commuting purpose it may have it's usefullness since I find myself not always in need of full lumination at certain point of my route. The cutback of the output will also conserve battery. For hills, trail and wood will depend on the condition. The mode can be change because it has several mode including High and Low which bypass the light sensor.

    I have yet taken the unit out for a ride. I usually do that last after all other test including beamshot so that I will not get any prejudgement of the unit in a preview before all other test ic near completion. Honestly I can hardly wait to take it out for a spin.


    [edited for spelling...me going back to spelling school]

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    Quote Originally Posted by mattthemuppet View Post
    so how's the light sensor supposed to work - more light the darker it gets or just an on/off? What about commuters who want a bright "to be seen" light for the road? What's the threshold for the light sensor controlling the light - full sunlight/ mid day shade/ twilight/ complete darkness?

    It's an interesting idea, but the devil's in the details as they say

    I also can't tell from the photos - is the battery a standard 4 cell (2S2P) battery? I'm surprised that the capacity isn't higher - 4400mAh packs (2200mAh cells) were commonplace a couple of years ago and battery tech has moved on considerably since then. Panasonic even have a 3400mAh cell out now (as do Sanyo and Samsung I believe) and their 2600-2900mAh cells are much more affordable now.
    It is a 4 cell battery pack. The charger label as 8.4v so I can almost for sure say that it is a 2s2p config.

    The light has 4 modes to choose from. Each click of the switch goes from one mode to the next. It start in the Hi mode with no sensor control. Next mode is the Low mode with no sensor control. The third mode is sensor control and the 4th mode is blink mode. You can turn off the light from any mode by holding the switch for three second or flip through all mode and it will trun off after the blink mode.

    From what I can tell, the sensor mode (third mode) will react to ambient lights. It seem to have four step of illumination. It is not infinite stepping but rather just the four steps. The high to low and inbetween illumination has a fairly decent range. I will set up the sphere to see what each of the four step are producing in terms of approximated lumen readings.

    The sensor itself is somewhat sensitive in the sense that a flashlight across the sensor can make it react quickly (video will be posted soon). This might be a good thing as the changes of ambient lights in the night time may not be all that much to begin with. When I do take it out for a test ride, it may tell me how well it reacts to ambient light changes. I have yet device a way to tell the ambient light changes indoor to see how much ambient lux requires as to when each of the four step changes. I may try to take a dimmer light and a lux meter using ceiling bounce and note the ambient light vs the lightheat output.

    There is a fifth step in the auto sensor cutback. That happen to be fully off. When there is too much ambient light, the unit will shut off completely and automactically turns back on when the ambient light falls below a certain value.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by colleen c View Post
    The light has 4 modes to choose from. Each click of the switch goes from one mode to the next. It start in the Hi mode with no sensor control. Next mode is the Low mode with no sensor control. The third mode is sensor control and the 4th mode is blink mode. You can turn off the light from any mode by holding the switch for three second or flip through all mode and it will turn off after the blink mode.

    From what I can tell, the sensor mode (third mode) will react to ambient lights. It seem to have four step of illumination. It is not infinite stepping but rather just the four steps. The high to low and in between illumination has a fairly decent range. I will set up the sphere to see what each of the four step are producing in terms of approximated lumen readings.

    The sensor itself is somewhat sensitive in the sense that a flashlight across the sensor can make it react quickly (video will be posted soon). This might be a good thing as the changes of ambient lights in the night time may not be all that much to begin with. When I do take it out for a test ride, it may tell me how well it reacts to ambient light changes. I have yet device a way to tell the ambient light changes indoor to see how much ambient lux requires as to when each of the four step changes. I may try to take a dimmer light and a lux meter using ceiling bounce and note the ambient light vs the lightheat output.

    There is a fifth step in the auto sensor cutback. That happen to be fully off. When there is too much ambient light, the unit will shut off completely and automatically turns back on when the ambient light falls below a certain value.
    Didn't want to hijack your review so I waited for you to respond to Matt's question. The Light Sense mode reads surrounding lux and adjust the output accordingly as you worked out.

    The approximate parameters are: surrounding ambient 0 lux = 100% output, 10-20 lux = 80%, 20-30 = 60%, 30-40 lux = 40% and finally 40-50% lux = 20% output. Don't think it turns off if you are riding in the sun but worth checking out. I don't have time to night ride in the afternoon so I don't know the answer to that one. See if it works according to the approximate parameters above which is actually in the leaflet supplied but in a graph form.
    Leonard - All things Xeccon + Beyond
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    Quote Originally Posted by colleen c View Post
    I took a lumen test with my home madeDIY sphere.
    When you're finished field testing the light could you pull the LED from it and compare with a U2 direct from a cree reseller (eg Cutter.com.au). Ideally with a 3A power supply but you could use the light as the driver.
    DIY LED Bike Lights:
    A few Dynamo builds and some Small battery lights

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    Quote Originally Posted by znomit View Post
    When you're finished field testing the light could you pull the LED from it and compare with a U2 direct from a cree reseller (eg Cutter.com.au). Ideally with a 3A power supply but you could use the light as the driver.
    I'm not fully understanding the request. Do you want me to swap out the OEM LED with a U2 from Cutter and retest the lumen output from the sphere? If I dig around, I think I have a disassemble Yezl "big head" flashlight that has the 2.8 amp XML driver but need to search around for it.

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    I uploaded some picture showing the weight of the lighthead and battery pack. The lighthead weights 122 grams and the battery weights 285 grams. I edited the first post to include picture of the scale with the light and battery.

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    Quote Originally Posted by colleen c View Post
    I'm not fully understanding the request. Do you want me to swap out the OEM LED with a U2 from Cutter and retest the lumen output from the sphere? If I dig around, I think I have a disassemble Yezl "big head" flashlight that has the 2.8 amp XML driver but need to search around for it.
    Yep, a test of bare LED so you can see if its U2/T6/T5 etc.

    Ideally pull the LED, remount onto a testing block so you can compare multiple LEDs from different lights.
    DIY LED Bike Lights:
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    Quote Originally Posted by znomit View Post
    Yep, a test of bare LED so you can see if its U2/T6/T5 etc.

    Ideally pull the LED, remount onto a testing block so you can compare multiple LEDs from different lights.
    OK I understand better now. I see what I can do after the full review is over. It might be for a while before that happen since I will keep the unit fully intact until all answer and other test request is fullfill (beamshot, video, on the road picture and video etc....)

    Just from the looks of the current test (1.1a) vs the total lux from the meter when comparing the lux from the 808e XML and current draw test from that (1.5 amps), I almost can say that the LED is an U2 because of the efficiency I am getting from the total lux vs current draw.

    I will do a temperature test as suggested from Leonard. It will be a comparison between the T6 XML 808E and the U2 1206.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Xeccon View Post
    Also worth noting the 808E with T6 has a consistent runtime of 3 hours 15 mins with a 4400mAh battery. The 1206 has an approximately additional 43 minute runtime advantage at what's pretty similar lumen output. If the market wants Xeccon to drive it harder we may. It's a case of take from Peter give to Paul. I guess at the end of the day it's about balance.

    Just a suggestion, Colleen. Be interesting to compare operating temperature test side by side.
    Check this out. This Xeccon Spiker 1206 is so cool. Not just saying literally but also physically. It runs pretty darn cool from what I can tell.

    I took the suggestion above and ran it side by side with the 808E XML T6. I used a IR temp gun and check the temp right at the top of the housing where it seem to be the hot spot for both lights. I was impress by the housing temp of the 1206 during the test. I even had done the test twice with it mounted on my DIY sphere to be sure that the light was set on high and did not automactically cut back in power without my knowledge. During the entire test, it was always on high. It did finally reached 145 F degree but it took a while and it did lose about 100 lumens at that temp (which should be normal) but that's OK because when was the last time I rode in 145 degree temp? All temp recorded was in F and not Celcius.

    Here was the results:

    Minutes______________Xeccon 1206 XML U2__________MS 808E XML T6

    Ambient-------------------------------------76-----------------------------------------76
    1 min-----------------------------------------83-----------------------------------------91
    2 min-----------------------------------------90-----------------------------------------101
    3 min-----------------------------------------96-----------------------------------------114
    4 min-----------------------------------------101----------------------------------------122
    5 min-----------------------------------------107----------------------------------------129
    6 min-----------------------------------------111----------------------------------------137
    7 min-----------------------------------------115----------------------------------------145
    8 min-----------------------------------------119----------------------------------------149 (I shut off MS)
    9 min-----------------------------------------122
    10 min---------------------------------------126
    11 min---------------------------------------129
    12 min---------------------------------------132
    13 min---------------------------------------134
    14 min---------------------------------------136
    15 min---------------------------------------138
    16 min---------------------------------------140
    17 min---------------------------------------143
    18 min---------------------------------------145

    I got bored by the 18 minute mark so I shut it off. As far as I can tell, it dissipate heat fairly well. As a matter of fact it probably the best coolest operating light I have in my collection.

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    With respect to the light sensor, what happens when car headlight shines on it from nehind you, does it dim the light (i assume that's the sensor mounted into the rear of the unit?)

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    Quote Originally Posted by tb123 View Post
    With respect to the light sensor, what happens when car headlight shines on it from nehind you, does it dim the light (i assume that's the sensor mounted into the rear of the unit?)
    You are correct to assume the sensor is at the rear of the unit. The modes of the Spiker 1206 are: High > Low > Light Sense > Strobe. You can choose to bypass Light Sense if you're mountain biking with a group of riders with bright lights behind you.

    To your question. If the light unit is fitted on bars and you're on Light Sense mode with a car's headlight at your six, your body should shadow the car's beam. Doubt it will affect the Light Sense sensor much in this case.

    However if the light unit is fitted on helmet then being about a meter above the central hotspot of the headlight (hypothetically speaking if the car is following closely) it should activate it. In which case, the car headlight should shine a light path in front of you albeit some shadowing from your body.

    More homework for Colleen, if she is up to it. Be interesting to know how quickly Light Sense reacts and resumes. Suggest having the 1206 in the sphere at max, turn down/off the room lights. Have someone else use a floodlight (not too close) to momentarily shine towards the sensor simulating a car driving past and one at constant for a minute or so. Watch the lumen count drop and resume. This will give us an indication of how quickly it responds and resumes.
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    You can't compare Xeccon to Magicshine, I have found Xeccon bike lights and diving torches are much better quality.

    Looking forward to seeing the new models.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Torchy View Post
    You can't compare Xeccon to Magicshine, I have found Xeccon bike lights and diving torches are much better quality.

    Looking forward to seeing the new models.
    From the appearance of the exterior construction, I would have to agree that the Spiker 1206 is pretty good quality. The only area of concern I see is the sensor in the back. From initial view of the sensor, it looks to be fragile. It slightly stick out of the housing. However it is very small in size and mounted solid on the housing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tb123 View Post
    With respect to the light sensor, what happens when car headlight shines on it from nehind you, does it dim the light (i assume that's the sensor mounted into the rear of the unit?)
    I suspect that won't be an issue although I have yet taken it out to test it on a ride. I will test that after some beamshot. The sensor is much more sensitve in the center than it is from the side. A flashlight shine directly onto the center will make it dim much more rapidly than if I take a flashlight from the side and shine onto it. A car headlight from behind probably will be mostly block while from the side might not be enough to trigger that sensor.

    The only other area where I was thinking maybe an issue will be for those who uses high power helmet light. I can see where looking down at something like the spedometer or GPS and having the spill from the helmet light may cause the sensor to react if the 1206 was bar mounted. I"m planning to test that as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Xeccon View Post
    More homework for Colleen, if she is up to it. Be interesting to know how quickly Light Sense reacts and resumes. Suggest having the 1206 in the sphere at max, turn down/off the room lights. Have someone else use a floodlight (not too close) to momentarily shine towards the sensor simulating a car driving past and one at constant for a minute or so. Watch the lumen count drop and resume. This will give us an indication of how quickly it responds and resumes.
    I have this video I done two days ago. I was hoping to get a better video but it seem like my camera has auto exposure in video mode. So I took the video using a Contour instead and worked out well. In the video, you can see the 4 step of light reduction as the ambient light on the sensor increased.

    I have also taken some reading of the lumen with the sphere in those 4 step and got these results:

    It went from High at 700 lumens to 632....485....304....and finally 200 lumens. If enough lights did shine on the sensor, it does completely shut off which is something may be bad or good.


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    Quote Originally Posted by colleen c View Post
    ....I got bored by the 18 minute mark so I shut it off. As far as I can tell, it dissipate heat fairly well. As a matter of fact it probably the best coolest operating light I have in my collection.
    Colleen, like you I found the MS 808E does heat up very fast.
    If you get time see if you can do a similar test where both lights are on high with some cooling added from a fan on low. At the ten minute mark I would be curious to know how much the light output drops with this set-up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cat-man-do View Post
    Colleen, like you I found the MS 808E does heat up very fast.
    If you get time see if you can do a similar test where both lights are on high with some cooling added from a fan on low. At the ten minute mark I would be curious to know how much the light output drops with this set-up.
    I did the test last night. Both light started at ambient 78 degree. I did each individually on the sphere with fan cooling and identical setup. The 808E heated up to 113 degree in 10 minute even with fan cooling. It drop 149 lumens. The 1206 heated up to 103 degree and drop 63 lumens. The 808e started with more lux and ended up with less at 10min mark. Interesting to see how heat buildup can impair the performance of the light.

    I did recorded the test on video. The first 3 min or so is interesting to see the lux drop on the meter of each light. The scale on the light meter is X10 and correction factor to change to lumens is 21.4.

    The link for the 1206 is here:
    Xeccon Spiker 1206 10 minute lux test - YouTube

    The link for MS 808E is here:
    MS 808E 10 min test - YouTube

    At this point, I want to emphasize the reason I use a 808E as comparison although the beam is totally different for the 808E and 1206. The 1206 is flood while the 808E is spot. The only single XML led light I have in the same comparable size and performance is the the 808E. All my other XML lights are either multiple XML or super small single xml package size.

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    Quote Originally Posted by colleen c View Post
    ..I did the test last night. Both light started at ambient 78 degree. I did each individually on the sphere with fan cooling and identical setup. The 808E heated up to 113 degree in 10 minute even with fan cooling. It drop 149 lumens. The 1206 heated up to 103 degree and drop 63 lumens. The 808e started with more lux and ended up with less at 10min mark. Interesting to see how heat buildup can impair the performance of the light....
    Thanks Colleen. You just confirmed what my eyes were already telling me. I too will be using the 808E for comparison. Nothing wrong with the 808E, it is a fine light but it does get hot. When I do my review I will be doing pretty much the same thing...ie...measuring the output after ten minutes to see how much it drops.

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