Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 52
  1. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation: androgen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    874
    Quote Originally Posted by -archie- View Post
    i remember the days when riding with 4*aa-powered halogen light was considered "normal", but now? Why one want to have super-low mode on bike light?
    for when you snap your frame in half and have to walk back 20 miles

  2. #27
    Brant-C.
    Reputation: bcaronongan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    1,007
    i typically ride with buddies. wife and i just think it's safer since i have a two hour drive to any trail head.
    I just like riding my mountain bike.

  3. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    2,265
    Quote Originally Posted by -Archie- View Post
    I remember the days when riding with 4*AA-powered halogen light was considered "normal", but now? Why one want to have super-low mode on bike light?
    I use a "hidden" low low mode on my helmet light for checking the map or most any other non-riding time.

  4. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation: androgen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    874
    Quote Originally Posted by Vancbiker View Post
    I use a "hidden" low low mode on my helmet light for checking the map or most any other non-riding time.
    on the seca there is a diffuse downward spill which works very well for things like that provided that the light is helmet mounted. unfortunately the light is still chewing through the battery at a fast pace when you do that.

  5. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mtbRevolution's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    343
    Fully agree having a compass at all times. If you know where north is and the trailhead general direction then chances of you making it back without a map is quite good. I have a compass on my watch but I still carry one of these small Munkees compass. I stuck a separate thermometer on my bike using double sided tape. Their products are great and I am sure you'll find something you need for ride or trek. Product 1084 in this page is really handy. They are not expensive and I advise against getting the really cheap compasses off eBay. It's a survival tool.

    The danger with losing your sense of direction is, you may be less than a mile from a main road when you FELT got lost and you ride deeper in the opposite direction. Now, you're truly lost. Also, if you feel you're lost, conserve battery power. Use hi only to indentify landmarks.
    Leonard - All things Xeccon + Beyond
    mtbRevolution.com

  6. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation: androgen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    874
    Quote Originally Posted by mtbRevolution View Post
    Fully agree having a compass at all times. If you know where north is and the trailhead general direction then chances of you making it back without a map is quite good. I have a compass on my watch but I still carry one of these small Munkees compass. I stuck a separate thermometer on my bike using double sided tape. Their products are great and I am sure you'll find something you need for ride or trek. Product 1084 in this page is really handy. They are not expensive and I advise against getting the really cheap compasses off eBay. It's a survival tool.

    The danger with losing your sense of direction is, you may be less than a mile from a main road when you FELT got lost and you ride deeper in the opposite direction. Now, you're truly lost. Also, if you feel you're lost, conserve battery power. Use hi only to indentify landmarks.
    iphone has a built in compass, aside from GPS. so do many other good smartphones.

    maybe i'm missing something here ...

  7. #32
    turtles make me hot
    Reputation: NYrr496's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    4,452
    I ride the exact same trails at night I ride during the day. Most of it is a greenbelt and you can see houses through the trees especially in winter when there's no leaves.
    We don't have bears or anything on Long Island, so really no worries in the wildlife department.
    I like turtles

  8. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    477
    compass = halogen. GPS = LED
    "By Your Command"

  9. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    2,265
    Quote Originally Posted by androgen View Post
    iphone has a built in compass, aside from GPS. so do many other good smartphones.

    maybe i'm missing something here ...
    No miss. The point, I think, was that a compass, whether old school or new fangled, or a GPS can be a useful piece of piece of gear in the event of getting disoriented in the woods.

  10. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mtbRevolution's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Posts
    343
    Quote Originally Posted by Vancbiker View Post
    No miss. The point, I think, was that a compass, whether old school or new fangled, or a GPS can be a useful piece of piece of gear in the event of getting disoriented in the woods.
    That's right. IMO this is not about old school or new. My HTC is in the cradle on the stem every time I night ride. GPS is turned on for Real Time GPS tracker. Using GPS and having the display screen on even periodically drains phone batteries really fast. Set the screen brightness higher or have apps running will see it go down even faster. It can take hours to walk out of a forest. Will the power-hungry smartphone endure? Keep precious power when you really need it. Also bear in mind a smartphone can hold charge better on some days compared to another depending in use and what's running in the background - they are almost unpredictable. If we are walking out in the dark then all we need is enough light and direction check every so often. The humble compass at your service.

    Going old school with survival equipment isn't a bad thing. Battery power is finite. Old school equipment don't have these limitations. Wind-up torches are items we laugh at when we see them. Wind, wind wind to get these pathetic outputs? When bike light batteries are long depleted and the smartphone dead in the water, that silly wind up torch will end up being your new best friend. I know this is not what the OP wants to hear but so far, we've only assume we're stuck because of bike problems. Consider unfortunates like sprained ankles, broken bones or internal injuries. Having a small low powered torch will also see you though the night if you are staying put till sunrise.

    So best to avoid these very unlikely but possible unfortunates. Listen to the unanimous advice to night ride only on familiar trails. Ride within reasonable distances from roads and civilization. Don't play control the uncontrollable. Don't ride dangerous technical sections or explore new areas alone. Let loved ones know where you are. Come home safe to do it another day, I mean night.
    Leonard - All things Xeccon + Beyond
    mtbRevolution.com

  11. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation: androgen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    874
    Quote Originally Posted by mtbRevolution View Post
    That's right. IMO this is not about old school or new. My HTC is in the cradle on the stem every time I night ride. GPS is turned on for Real Time GPS tracker. Using GPS and having the display screen on even periodically drains phone batteries really fast. Set the screen brightness higher or have apps running will see it go down even faster. It can take hours to walk out of a forest. Will the power-hungry smartphone endure? Keep precious power when you really need it. Also bear in mind a smartphone can hold charge better on some days compared to another depending in use and what's running in the background - they are almost unpredictable. If we are walking out in the dark then all we need is enough light and direction check every so often. The humble compass at your service.

    Going old school with survival equipment isn't a bad thing. Battery power is finite. Old school equipment don't have these limitations. Wind-up torches are items we laugh at when we see them. Wind, wind wind to get these pathetic outputs? When bike light batteries are long depleted and the smartphone dead in the water, that silly wind up torch will end up being your new best friend. I know this is not what the OP wants to hear but so far, we've only assume we're stuck because of bike problems. Consider unfortunates like sprained ankles, broken bones or internal injuries. Having a small low powered torch will also see you though the night if you are staying put till sunrise.

    So best to avoid these very unlikely but possible unfortunates. Listen to the unanimous advice to night ride only on familiar trails. Ride within reasonable distances from roads and civilization. Don't play control the uncontrollable. Don't ride dangerous technical sections or explore new areas alone. Let loved ones know where you are. Come home safe to do it another day, I mean night.
    one thing that drains phone batteries is low network signal level. when there is no cell tower nearby the phone will boost its own antenna output to try to communicate and this really takes a hit on the battery life. when i go to swimming pool i leave my phone in a metal locker which blocks most of the signal - if i don't turn my phone off when i put it there 2 hours later it has used up as much battery as it would have in a whole day in an area with good signal. so it's not just the screen and the apps that eat the battery, but also the antenna output.

    that said i have an anker portable charger:

    Amazon.com: Anker 2nd Gen Astro2 9000mAh External Battery Charger Rapid-Recharge (3A Output) Dual-Port Shake-to-Wake Portable Highest-Energy-Efficiency Backup Power Pack for Google Glass, iPhone 5S, 5C, 5, 4S, 4, iPads, Samsung Galaxy Tablets, other

    the link is to the new one, i have an older one, but it will recharge a phone from flat several times. an older android phone has 1700-1800 mah batteries. a new android phone will have 2100 - 2600 mah batteries. this power bank is 9000 mah. i bought it after Hurricane Sandy left us without power for days ( others were without power for weeks ). but Anker has different size ones and most are pocketable.

    additionally my Samsung phone has removable battery, and i actually crushed my battery in an accident and using an Anker battery in it right now ( Samsung Brand Battery was like $50, Anker was like $15 and it holds charge very well ). anyway both Samsung and Anker sell external chargers and spare batteries for Samsung phones, so you have have a spare battery or two with you OR you can have an external battery, or both.

    so even in a low signal area with the screen on you can still prepare your phone battery to survive for as long as necessary - and as long as you don't use genuine Samsung parts to do it it won't even be that expensive.

    Samsung currently has the best battery solutions on their phones. Not only are Samsung batteries removable in a flash ( unlike iPhone, HTC One, or Motorola X ) but Samsung also has the highest capacity batteries in their phones right now - 2600 mah in Galaxy S4 and 3200 mah in Galaxy Note 3 ( goes on sale October 1st ).

    Anker replacement batteries are same capacity as Samsung original ones. Samsung simply designs their phones nowadays with physically LARGE batteries, so replacement ones from 3rd party will be high capacity as well. The battery is Galaxy Note 3 phone is almost the same size as an entire iPhone !

  12. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,619
    Dealing with normal survival things is pretty straightforward and there has been a lot written on it. Even if you have to stash your bike and walk out, while uncomfortable and inconvenient, it's doable and you'll be ok.

    The real risk is this is if you incapacitated or hurt where you can't walk. Then your survival could be a serious issue. If alone, there is no one to help you etc... Hopefully, you've been prudent and told someone where you are going and when you will be back.

    The big risk is a head injury or an injury or condition that leaves you either loopy in making poor decisions or unconscious. If you are unconscious, you can't call anyone either (assuming you're in cellular coverage). If you are loopy or disoriented, you may not ever be found since you likely won't proceed in a rational direction and searchers will be looking for you in the rational locations first. So this is a really bad deal and we've all heard what happens where someone gets lost in the backcountry and searchers finally find the body in a completely unexpected place. This is where having a tracker on you is valuable.

    If you are in cellular coverage, and have a smart phone, there are a number of apps that will allow others to track where you were or to, at least, find out your last location in the event the battery dies or the phone is rendered inoperable. This is especially useful if you have told someone where you are going and when you intend to be back. It's easy for them to monitor your progress and check up on you. I use an iPhone and the apps that I use are either/or Find My Friends or Glympse. Both work really well and a rescuer can walk right to your location with a GPS or smartphone.

    Other than that, while it's not a great idea to go alone, you can do it but not recommended. Same caveats apply to swimming alone, being in the backcountry alone etc... (lots written on how to do this - search is your friend).

    J.

  13. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,619
    BTW, here's what I use to get lots of battery power. I use my iPhone as my bike computer using Cyclemeter from abvio.com (great app). For about each hour of use though if you have the display on, it will drop about 20-30% so depending on the level when I go out, that can be a problem.

    When I travel for work, I need an extra battery so I bought the iBattz Mojo Refuel battery case for the iphone. You can use (ironically) Samsung i9300 batteries to swap them in and out as much as you want. With a full iBattz battery and my iphone battery, it would be good for 10 hours or more. For an additional $20, they make a otterbox style case that the battery sled fits into so the whole thing is well ruggedized. I mount that using a Quadlock (iPhone Bike Mount | Quad Lock - iPhone/Galaxy Bike Mount) stem mount. Works super well - and has plenty of juice for my needs plus sending my position back so my wife can find me if I'm hurt or stuck.



    J.

  14. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Cat-man-do's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    3,713
    Quote Originally Posted by mtbRevolution View Post
    Going old school with survival equipment isn't a bad thing. Battery power is finite. Old school equipment don't have these limitations. Wind-up torches are items we laugh at when we see them. Wind, wind wind to get these pathetic outputs? When bike light batteries are long depleted and the smartphone dead in the water, that silly wind up torch will end up being your new best friend. I know this is not what the OP wants to hear but so far, we've only assume we're stuck because of bike problems. Consider unfortunates like sprained ankles, broken bones or internal injuries. Having a small low powered torch will also see you though the night if you are staying put till sunrise.
    Generally I carry a small AA powered torch for emergency repairs and that should carry me through most circumstances on which I find myself without a working lamp. On low it should run close to three hours ( about 60 lumen on low ). If needed I could helmet mount it if I could still ride.

    I don't do back country excursions too often but when I do I will always carry lights, even for planned day rides. For those planned day excursions I will usually carry some lighter weight torches rather than my usual night set-up. In a pinch the two torches can supply enough run time to run for three hours. That's with one on the helmet and one on the bars...( ea. with one 18650 cell ) with each lamp set for medium.

    Along with that set-up I will bring a hiker/camping torch that has a super low output. I own one of the old style Princeton Tec AAA LED torches that has maybe a 10-20 lumen output. It's suppose to run for 40hrs on 4 AAA's.

    Now that we're on the subject of emergencies and such I've decided to do something I've wanted to do for some time now but have always put off. I'm going to WRITE DOWN the sequence of things I'm going to do if I ever hurt myself and can't walk out of the woods. Then I'm going to put a copy on my computer and in each of my bike bags. Basically it's just going to be a formal list of Apps and phone numbers I'll be using on my phone to help others find me. Believe me, if you ride alone you need to do this because no way do you want to try to figure this out when your leg or arm is broken and you are in great pain.

  15. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,619
    A number of years ago, my wife and I went for a ride on the trails near Bayfield, WI (on Lake Superior). It was a cloudy overcast afternoon (4pm or so) when we left. Plan was to ride for about an hour and then go back to the car. Even though we were very familiar with the area, we got turned around in the woods and on the fire trails. Got dark (was October) and with the overcast there was no light, no landmarks, no moon etc... It was incredibly dark - in places it was hard to see 10' away.

    We finally got out by following trails and roads downhill until we saw some lights through the trees and got back onto the local ski area's trail system. The only way we knew that was I had one of those coin cell early LED lights on my keychain (<4 lumens). It was enough so that we could see a sign and figure out where we were. That's how we figured out we had just gone in a big circle.

    But there's the lesson. We came very close to spending the night out in the woods with no warm clothing (there was snow on the ground in places from the week before), no way to make a fire, no water except what was left in our water bottles, no compass, no map, etc... Totally stupid and totally our fault. We're just lucky we didn't get hurt on top of it all.

    Things look really different in the dark. Now I never go out at night for something like that without being totally prepared. It's pretty easy to get in serious trouble in a place that you even think is familiar.

    J.
    Last edited by JohnJ80; 09-20-2013 at 09:15 AM.

  16. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Cat-man-do's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    3,713
    ....^^^, yep...you only go through that once to learn the lesson.
    On one of my few back country excursions ( This was many years ago ) I was navigating unknown territory by map and suddenly realized that the sun was setting faster than I expected. I did have the forethought to bring a bike light but it was for my ( then ) Niterider halogen helmet light and the battery was half depleted from a previous ride. I figured I had maybe 40 minutes of batttery juice left at best and I had at least an hour or so of travel left providing I didn't get lost. With the old style NiMH batteries you never knew how long you had before the battery pooped. Luckily I had just enough to get me off the mountain and back to my campsite. I had the Princeton tec with me but I certainly didn't want to wander through unknown territory with just one of those.

    With current LED/Li-ion technology available things are just so much better. LED lamps and GPS/smart phones you just have to love. Now if the same thing were to happen again I would just yawn and think to myself, "No problem, I have 6 hours of available run time with just two torches and two Li-ion cells". "GPS shows I have three miles to my next trail juncture, no problem".

  17. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    82
    I have been thinking exactly the same thing, i.e. is it irresponsible riding alone at night? Made it a bit more of a question to take seriously, now I have a kid. I live in the UK and am therefore fortunate that animals do not present any kind of issue on the trails. I usually ride in areas where I do not expect any trouble.

    I recently opted out of a solo night ride in Wales, (at a manmade trail centre - Y Wall at Afan), mainly because the height, exposure and technical element of the ride made me think twice. It is not a trail I know like the back of my hand, but I have ridden it previously. Funnily enough I have ridden the same trail in the rain late in an afternoon - again if anything happened it would likely be a while before anyone found me.

    Strangely I don't mind riding on some trails at night, solo, some 30 minutes from my house (Surrey Hills, UK). Arguably you are a bit closer to help, but you could still be out alone for a long time if lost/injured.

    I have just bought a second bike light, but things still go wrong and as the above posts say, good idea to have an idea of which direction you need to be headed in.

    My experiences of being lost/stranded are thankfully relatively limited, but they do include being lost in Pisghah, NC, with my wife (mid-afternoon) and stuck on trail I frequently ride in the UK after my CO2 and inner-tubes both failed when I needed to repair a puncture. Both not pleasant, but Pisgah was a lot more serious due to the size of the area and our lack of preparation.

    For longer rides I now pack compass, 1st aid, space blanket, whistle and if possible a decent map. Cell Phone also gets packed, but it is not always the best idea to rely on them.

  18. #43
    Light freak
    Reputation: scar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Posts
    2,420
    As I mentioned earlier in this thread, I ride in the dark alone occasionally. Always a chill ride but things can happen at anytime. Was on a group morning (5am) ride about 4 weeks ago and I woke up trying to pull myself back on trail but I could not stand up. Another rider behind me found me laying in the middle of the trail and brought me around enough to continue on to catch up with the pack. Tried to continue on but ended up passing out and waking up to find a bunch of people standing over top of me. Had to be helped out by the fire department. Ended up breaking two ribs, puncturing a lung, and a concussion. Really glad I was not by myself.

    Here is a story of a local rider that went out on training ride during the day by herself, fell and hit her head and could not find her way out. Quick little ride turned into spending a cold night in the mountains till search and rescue found her. Her husband helped by being able to recognize her tire tracks.

    Stuff happens - 'I don't remember falling:' Cyclist recounts 30-hour ordeal, rescue in mountains west of Colorado Springs


    ***

  19. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,619
    Exactly. Hitting your head (our family has considerable experience with traumatic brain injuries) means that all bets are off. It really doesn't take much to disorient you with that type of injury. Worse, if you do have a TBI and are disoriented and conscious, your decision making can be a mess and you'll make bad choices - choices that are likely illogical and lead you to get more lost rather than less. Just like happened here.

    Standard rules are in play - tell someone where you are going, when you will back and what your route is. Have communications that is trackable if there is any question that you would be hard to find. You can do this with smartphone apps and there are very reasonable personal EPIRB type devices around.

    The other side of this is that you also need to think about your rescuers. Searching at night for you can be dangerous to them as well. Searching at night isn't easy either and it's really easy to miss finding someone.

    J.

  20. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Cat-man-do's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    3,713
    Quote Originally Posted by scar View Post
    As I mentioned earlier in this thread, I ride in the dark alone occasionally. Always a chill ride but things can happen at anytime. Was on a group morning (5am) ride about 4 weeks ago and I woke up trying to pull myself back on trail but I could not stand up. Another rider behind me found me laying in the middle of the trail and brought me around enough to continue on to catch up with the pack. Tried to continue on but ended up passing out and waking up to find a bunch of people standing over top of me. Had to be helped out by the fire department. Ended up breaking two ribs, puncturing a lung, and a concussion. Really glad I was not by myself....
    If I had ever had something like that happen I would have been in big time trouble. This is also why when I do ride alone at night that I just don't take big time chances. It sort of takes some of the fun out of it but if you ride at night alone on a regular basis you accept the limitations in order to protect your skin.

    A couple weekends ago I did a ride where I came to a short steep section that I was well familiar with. Having not ridden the trail in over a year I stopped to look it over. The trail was extremely dry and sandy. I was about to pick a line and then thought better of it. Dry sandy terrain simply does not have the consistency/traction to provide for a safe controlled descent. With a line of trees looming at the bottom of the hill I decided to play it safe and walk. If I rode down, started to slide and lost control I could of been pealing my a8s off of one of the trees.

    Mountain biking is a dangerous sport. The more you know about the potential dangers of the terrain, the limitations of your equipment and your own limitations the better off you are. Been a while since I really rode anything scary at night. If I do decide to ride scary trails at night it might be a good idea to look into some good light-weight body armor. At my age a bad fall is not something I want to entertain.

  21. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,619
    It's worthy to note that your helmet will do a great job protecting against penetrating injuries but it does little to protect against concussion (shearing AKA DAI or Diffuse Axonal Injury) that comes from "shaken baby syndrome." While it didn't say in the article about the woman who got lost in Colorado Springs, she almost certainly was wearing a helmet and she still suffered a traumatic brain injury (TBI) with the resulting disorientation.

    There are helmets coming out now (this year and next) that do a better job (MIPS technology) but still when you are doing the survival thing you need to be completely on the ball.

    You have to be more careful at night, but it is fun and it is doable but even if the trail or road is in your backyard, you still need to be diligent about making sure you do it safely and that someone will come looking for you (and knows where to look) if you don't come back on time.

    J.

  22. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    477
    Most of my night rides are with myself. I do bring with me my blackberry and I have a program set that when the GPS notice that I have not move for more than 45mins, it'll send a text/bbm to my contacts as to the location I"m currently at and to send for help.

    You may want to see if your smart phone has this kind of program / app. It may be worth installing just in case you get in to trouble while on the trail day or night, if you ride a lone a lot. Hopefully you're in cell range when you're out on the trail. Most of the trails I ride are.
    "By Your Command"

  23. #48
    www.hahntronix.com
    Reputation: mhahn@hvc.rr.com's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    256
    My quick list of rules for night riding:

    1- More lights are better
    I usually ride with one on helmet, one on bars, a couple flashlights. If you have some kind of mounting device you can loan flashlight to folks whose lights die. Flashlights should be something you can actually use to ride with.

    2-The harder, less well known, or longer the ride, the more people you should bring
    I don't ride alone on hard trails. I might do a trail I've never been on at night but only with somebody who's ridden it before and doesn't ride like d*ckhead.

    4- Nobody gets left behind
    Group I ride with waits for everybody at every intersection. Anybody gets bored they can ride back and look for the slow riders.

    5-Tell someone where you will be riding and when you'll be back
    Saves the search and rescue guys a lot of time. I break this sometimes if riding really easy trails near home.

    6- Always bring a cell phone (two if in a group)
    Even if coverage sucks. In a group you can send somebody to find a signal and call the cavalry.

    7- Always bring too much crap
    Extra food, water, batteries, clothing, space blanket, tools, matches, etc. It gets mighty cold if you get stuck in the woods overnight (most of my night riding happens late fall, winter, and early spring).

    Edit:

    3- there is no rule 3 :-)
    Last edited by mhahn@hvc.rr.com; 10-06-2013 at 11:29 AM.
    Nimium est melior!

  24. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    72
    Yes I ride alone at night now and during the day alone as well. I find myself for the first time ever with a full time job meaning on week days I either dont ride or I ride at night. However, I take small precautions in that I ride the same regular spot that I always ride so I know exactly where I am and exactly how to tell people where I am. I also always ride with my phone set to endomondo so anybody on my friends list can see where I was when I last had signal. I also ride alone with my dog so I guess she gives me an ever so small sense of security in anybody approaching me.... they dont know shes a massive wuss and at 40kg she tends to put people off!

    However, i can definitely testify how its not nice riding alone whether it be during the day or at night. April this year while riding along I had an accident and I hit the deck going roughly 30mph (I know this because I remember seeing the tree and thinking oh crap and then I remember the sensation of somehow being 500 metres further on already on the phone to emergency services) and broke my jaw in 3 places and had to somehow explain to 999 exactly where I was and the feeling and thoughts that they perhaps may not find me.

    If you're riding somewhere you are not completely familiar with please take some precautions! The only reason I was able to tell 999 where I was is because I go there practically 3 times a week for the last 3 years... I know the sensation of concussion and looking round knowing exactly where I am and trying to connect my brain with my mouth to tell them and that was somewhere I knew. The idea of having to be in that situation where I was unfamiliar is fairly terrifying!

  25. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    1,619
    or being unconscious. or telling them the wrong place. Or not remembering that you actually even crashed (traumatic amnesia).

    I'm a ski patroller and I deal with a fair amount of concussions. Basically, if it's more than a mild one, you pretty much can't depend on anything they say and they usually can't remember anything either - like their name, where they are or what time it is or what happened (usually some combination of those). In point of fact, that's how you diagnose concussion in the field - orientation in person, place and time. Incidentally, all of those are pretty important fact for your potential rescuers. Some of the responses can be downright hilarious.

    When you get a concussion, you get your brains scrambled. What memory/knowledge you lose depends on where the actual injury to your brain is and how deeply you learned that knowledge. For example, few people could recognize someone they walked past on the street 10 minutes later but they would remember what their mother looked like even if they were pretty heavily injured. There are a lot more neurons committed to the memory of your mother than an incidental passerby. So there is no way to predict how you will react or how capable you will be even with a mild concussion.

    So for any planning, if you ride alone, you really should be trackable and someone should know what your planned route was and when you will be back. Otherwise, if you get whacked on the head, you could be in serious trouble and may be very difficult to rescue because you will have inadvertently increased the search radius. If you do the math, the area that needs to be searched increases with the square of the distance from you last known point. If you walk double the distance away, it's 4X the area.

    J.

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Night riding - Do you do it?
    By Mr. Lynch in forum Washington
    Replies: 121
    Last Post: 01-28-2014, 01:06 PM
  2. Nox Night riding
    By justriding in forum Pennsylvania
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 11-01-2012, 04:34 PM
  3. Night riding with a dog?
    By homey in forum Arizona
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 09-09-2012, 05:58 PM
  4. Night Riding?
    By vinnyl26 in forum California - Norcal
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 09-29-2011, 02:38 PM
  5. why did nobody tell me about night riding?!?
    By sdmtnguy in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 05-25-2011, 02:00 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •