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  1. #1
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    Idea! Magicshine MJ-870 & MJ-872 review :).

    It is a short version of my review - for some people it will be just enough (who the heal reads playboy ?? )
    for others here is the full version (all beam-shots and measurements) => Magicshine MJ-870 and MJ-872 - magic 1000+ lumens from 3 and 4 Cree XP-G leds.

    Some marketing data.


    Close up :


    A bit closer


    Very close...


    Total show off :


    How does it light ?

    Assuming that I did not get jumbled up during the measurements and that the Chinese did not insert there the possible worst Cree XP-G leds, but only the most popular R4, in theory, on the leds, you should get 1400 and 1050 lumens so that, in both cases, the lights exceed the magic limit of 1000 lumens. However, frankly, if you add circa 10% loss across the optics, you will have 1250 and 950 only but this is still a lot of light . Well, of course, the weakest mode has 20% instead of 30, but the Chinese light users have got used to such trifles already .

    Magicshine MJ-808 - SSC P7 (high ca. 600 lumens)


    Magicshine MJ-808E Cree XM-L (high, ca. 750 lumens)


    Magicshine MJ-870 - high (100%, ca. 950 lumens)


    Magicshine MJ-872 - high (100%, ca. 1250 lumens)


    Resume.

    The new lights, the new quality, a lot of light. I tested MJ-872 in a fight, arranging and winding up the route of the night competition for orientation; the 300+ lumens on the low mode were completely enough for me to move on broken-stone roads; I switched on the maximum mode once, perhaps most probably in order to see how it would be . What does it give in practice ? On the single battery pack, you may ride for 10 hours !. The optics of the distribution angle circa 20* illuminates ideally the road before the bike. To put into words simply, after the tests, the 4-unit stays with me (after replacement of the cables, thermo paste, lubricating of all gaskets and threads with silicone grease and accurate tightening; at last, its Chinese stuff ).
    Last edited by Dominik.M; 07-03-2011 at 01:46 PM.

  2. #2
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    Nice! That looks pretty sweet. Just so it's posted here, looks like street price is around $200 for the 4 emitter version. While that is getting out of the cheapo semi-disposable price range, it's still pretty amazing for the amount and quality of light, and running weight.

    The three emitter one is going for $126 at Dealextreme (but DX sucks serious rocks through a rope for customer service).

    *edit*

    Oh, the 4 element version is $146 at DX.

    Not sure I would run out to upgrade to it form my MJ808, since I don't seem to night ride enough to justify it.

  3. #3
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    About the beam shots....What are the distances to the various markers? What camera settings were used? Only reason I'm asking is because Geoman didn't like the beam pattern of the 872 but from what I'm seeing here it looks pretty good ( depending on the marker distances of course )

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    Very nice write up.

  5. #5
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    not that i expect any of these type of lights to be waterproof, but i wonder how this would stand up to the type of testing catman did with the ray4?
    Quote Originally Posted by HamfisT
    I understand that engineering has value in and of itself. But in the end, it's still just a pile of aluminum tubes.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cat-man-do View Post
    About the beam shots....What are the distances to the various markers? What camera settings were used?
    Those are my standard settings, for the last few years...

    In the room :
    ISO 200, time 1/8s, aperture 3.5, manual white balance (daylight).
    Distance from the wall 3.0 m - the distance of the camera from the wall 3.0 m (the wall - white matt emulsion)

    The gravel path:
    ISO 200, time 2s, aperture 3.5, manual white balance (daylight).
    Markers spaced every 5 meters, lamps aimed at the 10 meter.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by nick d View Post
    not that i expect any of these type of lights to be waterproof, but i wonder how this would stand up to the type of testing catman did with the ray4?
    Yes, I was thinking the same thing. Dominik, any chance you can throw the light body under a shower head ( 15-20 min. ) at close distance ( 6" or less )? Since you already have it dismantled you don't have to include the Leds or electronics ( a big advantage ).

    Nick, Don't be surprised if these fair better than the Ray IV. The back plate and button looks much different. Dominik, does the rear of the light include an O-ring? How was it sealed?

    About the the beam photo's: Okay I did the conversion, 65.5 ft. at the last marker. For some reason I thought it was longer. Still a nice wide beam pattern that does look to carry a bit further beyond the markers. Real important to point out though that both the 808 and 808E will easily out throw the markers ( x 2 ) if aimed higher ( as they are both spot beam oriented lamps ).

    Oh, almost forgot...I was going to comment about the 10 hr run time you quoted but I now see you are posting a chart that shows 2.2hrs on high. Since this light offers 4 distinct modes, any way you can show some photos of the 70% and 50%.beam patterns...... For us folks that like lower modes that would be a big plus.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cat-man-do View Post
    Dominik, does the rear of the light include an O-ring? How was it sealed?
    There is the same seal as in the front - but the most problematic is the switch cover - it's not tight enough to be waterproof (and it can't be because it's too big and too soft) so I sealed it using silicon grease for torches. There is also no seal around cable where it enters into the case - here I use silicone sealant. So now I can put it even under water for 1/2 hour to check if it meats IPX7 requirements



    Quote Originally Posted by Cat-man-do View Post
    Since this light offers 4 distinct modes, any way you can show some photos of the 70% and 50%.beam patterns...... For us folks that like lower modes that would be a big plus.
    All other beam-shots are available at my site - but nobody reads

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dominik.M View Post
    the most problematic is the switch cover - it's not tight enough to be waterproof (and it can't be because it's too big and too soft) so I sealed it using silicon grease for torches. There is also no seal around cable where it enters into the case - here I use silicone sealant. So now I can put it even under water for 1/2 hour to check if it meats IPX7 requirements
    It just totally boggles my mind why you guys think it's acceptable to spend $150 on a light and then have to perform some DIY handiwork to make it waterproof?

    And why are you posting this review in this forum? Shouldn't it be in the DIY forum? This light, as it leaves the factory, is not suited for anybody that takes their riding seriously.

    On another note, is it me or does it look like both the Magicshine and the BikeRay are built in the same factory using pretty much the same design?
    Last edited by Azra; 07-02-2011 at 06:07 AM.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Azra View Post
    On another note, is it me or does it look like both the Magicshine and the BikeRay are built in the same factory?
    Light and Go Foride = Magicshine MJ-856 = Magicshine MJ-872 in more fancy looking case.



    Light and Go Firefly = Magicshine MJ-858

  11. #11
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    So, Dominik, are you saying, "Look at the shiny case and ignore the waterproofing?" Is that it?

  12. #12
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    No, but basically if you want IPX7-8 Bike lamp you have to pay for it much more than 140 $, and not always you will get it, because producers these days are calculating "how many users are riding for 5-6 hours in the rain" -> 2-5% ? Ok, Then how much it will cost us to make our lamp waterproof ? 30% ?? No, thank you...

    That why most producers of the outdoor equipment are currently producing water resistant IPX4 lamps / headlamps. They may even meet the requirement's of the higher protection levels but nobody will declare that

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Azra View Post
    It just totally boggles my mind why you guys think it's acceptable to spend $150 on a light and then have to perform some DIY handiwork to make it waterproof?

    And why are you posting this review in this forum? Shouldn't it be in the DIY forum? This light, as it leaves the factory, is not suited for anybody that takes their riding seriously.

    On another note, is it me or does it look like both the Magicshine and the BikeRay are built in the same factory using pretty much the same design?
    Azra, I can only speak for myself as an owner of magicshines and a ray2, but i dont expect any cheap Chinese light to be waterproof. even if they blatantly advertised it as waterproof to a certain depth like some other manufacturers id be very skeptical. And even though the ray 3/4 and these magishines are more than the original magicshines, they are still 'cheap lights' compared to a light with simillar output from a 'better' manufacturer.

    I dont understand the ip ratings, but if they are not living up to that there is no excuse for false advertising, but it would not suprise me since it seems most all the Chinese manufacturers and vendors of those lights seem to have adopted the practice of overstating the output in lumens...

    I guess you could say you have to compare Output vs Ruggedness vs Price and pick the light that has the two you need, cause at this price it seems you cant have all three.

    The reason i can accept that these lights are not waterproof is that as a recreational rider i can generally avoid serious rain storms by just staying in and riding another night, which is an option that if i remember right you dont have since you use it for commuting also?

    It defiantly sounds like you will be better off with something like the stryker from baja designs even if it means you have to sacrifice some output in exchange for durability. In fact a while back he had a trade in deal, it might be worth checking to see if they still do.

    Im glad you have been so vocal about your experience because it will no doubt help people choose the light that is best for them.
    Quote Originally Posted by HamfisT
    I understand that engineering has value in and of itself. But in the end, it's still just a pile of aluminum tubes.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by nick d View Post
    i dont expect any cheap Chinese light to be waterproof.
    I could perhaps accept that a $79 Magicshine is cheap. But when you get in the $150-200 price range, that's not cheap. Cheaper than more established brands, yes, but not cheap.

    People that find $200 cheap would probably be buying a Lupine anyway.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Azra View Post
    I could perhaps accept that a $79 Magicshine is cheap. But when you get in the $150-200 price range, that's not cheap. Cheaper than more established brands, yes, but not cheap.

    People that find $200 cheap would probably be buying a Lupine anyway.
    $150 to $200 is certainly nothing you want to throw away, and its much more painful to throw away a $200 light than an $80 light, but the Lupine equivelant is what a Wilma5 for $595? IM sure its a much better light, and its probably not a truly fair comparision, but the cheapest Lupine i saw on geomans website was the Piko for $310 and im sure it doesnt put out the same amount of light as a ray3/4 or these new magicshines.

    Anyway, im not trying to argue, just saying there's a reason some vendors sell both lines
    Quote Originally Posted by HamfisT
    I understand that engineering has value in and of itself. But in the end, it's still just a pile of aluminum tubes.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Azra View Post
    I could perhaps accept that a $79 Magicshine is cheap. But when you get in the $150-200 price range, that's not cheap. Cheaper than more established brands, yes, but not cheap.

    People that find $200 cheap would probably be buying a Lupine anyway.
    For such lights as MS, Floride, BR etc, the increase in price from say US$79 (single P7) to $150++ (quad XPG) has got little to do with manufacturing quality but simply the optics, emitters and circuit boards they are using in the light head itself. Everything else remains as is unfortunately. I do agree that having to open up light heads and perform ER as in the BikeRay IV thread is more than I'd want to do but waterproofing seals and threads with grease etc is acceptable in my books.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dominik.M View Post
    There is the same seal as in the front - but the most problematic is the switch cover - it's not tight enough to be waterproof (and it can't be because it's too big and too soft) so I sealed it using silicon grease for torches. There is also no seal around cable where it enters into the case - here I use silicone sealant. So now I can put it even under water for 1/2 hour to check if it meats IPX7 requirements
    Dominik, Thanks again for the pictures of the back plate. This looks like the inside of the back plate ( if I'm not mistaken ). At least it has an O-ring. There also looks like a secondary O-ring (?). I don't know about anyone else but after my experience with the Ray IV seeing some O-rings inspires confidence. It remains to be seen though just how well these rubber buttons can hold out water. At least with the MS 872 it is larger and might have more wiggle room. If true it might work better ( or in this case be a much easier fix ). Was it hard to get the back off? What tool was required and how was it done?

    What you said about the water-resistance of these kinds of lights is likely true. I think once you market something as "water-proof" you almost have to charge more money because the product will be held to a much higher standard and will cost more to produce. Not to mention it makes a great selling point for the vendors.

    In keeping with that thought, in the case of the Baja Stryker, since the design was so well thought out you are going to get much better water-resistance ( if not an out right water-proof quality level ). Need I say, the Stryker is much more money than other P-7 bike lights. Still with all that said I think I might be willing to pay another 20% for a typical Chinese light that was designed to be completely water-proof. Whither that will happen anytime soon is anyone's guess.

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    I don't get it. If all it takes is a smidge of grease to make those lights waterproof, why isn't that done at the factory?

    Surely $0.01 of grease would not increase the manufacturing cost by 30%.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Azra View Post
    I don't get it. If all it takes is a smidge of grease to make those lights waterproof, why isn't that done at the factory?

    Surely $0.01 of grease would not increase the manufacturing cost by 30%.
    At some point I think your getting obsessive about the MS stuff. I think the whole point of 'Azra doesnt like them' was made pretty well....

    I bet soon enough though, the aforementioned problems will be addressed overseas.
    CDT

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    Quite to the contrary, I'd like nothing better than to see Magicshine and BikeRay produce lights that are well designed, powerful, cheap, and waterproof. I'd love it. And I'd gladly buy one.

    I'm not a fool that craves status symbols to show off at the next group ride. Nor am I loaded with money. I'd much rather buy a $200 light from MS or BR than a $700 light from Light and Motion. Or even a $400 light from DiNotte.

    But if MS and BR produce lights that are crap and will die on me the first time it rains (as the BR IV has done so ignominiously), then... well, the lights are crap. I like to call things what they are. And if it offends fans of MS and BR, then so be it.

    If we were to all tell MS and BR "your lights are crap" maybe they'd get the message and actually start using some grease and silicone sealant in the final assembly. But as long as we have apologists saying "it's really no big deal", "you can seal it yourself with a little grease if you like", "who rides in the rain anyway?", etc, then MS and BR will continue to sell crap. And established manufacturers will continue to sell us grossly overpriced products. I don't like that.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dominik.M View Post
    Light and Go Foride = Magicshine MJ-856 = Magicshine MJ-872 in more fancy looking case.

    Perhaps with a tighter optic?

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cat-man-do View Post
    Was it hard to get the back off? What tool was required and how was it done?.
    It was easy to unscrew - it only take me some time to understood how do they put it all together, because I get used to typical torch design...

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chromagftw View Post
    For such lights as MS, Floride, BR etc, the increase in price from say US$79 (single P7) to $150++ (quad XPG) has got little to do with manufacturing quality but simply the optics, emitters and circuit boards they are using in the light head itself. Everything else remains as is unfortunately. I do agree that having to open up light heads and perform ER as in the BikeRay IV thread is more than I'd want to do but waterproofing seals and threads with grease etc is acceptable in my books.
    About the last part, I agree. If I had known going in what the real problem with the Ray IV was ( the rear plate threads/ lack of O-ring ) I could of simply found a suitable O-ring, slipped in over the top and slapped on some sealant without even having to completely remove the plate. Unfortunately I thought the biggest problem was the button cover. While it could still be a problem it was not the problem I originally thought it was. As such it would have been better if I had not taken the back of the light off. Anyway, don't want to venture too much off topic...

    In the case of the MS 872 the design of the rear plate is much different. As such my bet is that it will be much better at shedding water than the Ray IV. Since it has already been modded by the OP no real way to know for sure unless he has another one to fiddle with.

    As for the optics, I could wish for more throw but than again I always do.
    At 2hrs on high the run time lacks and if you power down to lower levels the throw will suffer even more. I think for this light a bigger battery is in order ( 5200mAh or more ) Two and half hours run time on high would be an improvement but 3hrs would be preferable.

    Znomit, any links to beam shots of the MS 856?

  24. #24
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    Dominik - was there any thermal paste between that ribbed outer heatsink and the main casing? Did you run the light before dismantling to see how well the light heated up? If there wasn't any thermal paste, it would be a good idea to put some in, even if the light head has some kind of thermal management.

    Oh, and were you able to measure the current the LEDs were being driven at? The power figures quoted imply they're being driven above 1A, so there may be some grounds for their output claims

  25. #25
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    anybody know if these optics would work with the 4 led version: http://www.cutter.com.au/cart.php?rp...prod%3Dcut1000

    somebody posted the link on dx, but i guess someone with the light would have to take some measurements to make sure?

    edit: actually i found some measurements above, looks like its too small?
    Quote Originally Posted by HamfisT
    I understand that engineering has value in and of itself. But in the end, it's still just a pile of aluminum tubes.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chromagftw View Post
    For such lights as MS, Floride, BR etc, the increase in price from say US$79 (single P7) to $150++ (quad XPG) has got little to do with manufacturing quality but simply the optics, emitters and circuit boards they are using in the light head itself.
    I doubt the components increase the cost that much - quad XP-G boards from reputable sellers are ~$30 at retail. The increase over a C-bin P7 at bulk is probably ~$15 at most. Optic isn't more than a couple of bucks (and excessively floody by the looks of it) and I doubt the driver is any better built than the cheap jobs they put in the other MS lights. The fancier case probably adds $5 bulk at a very rough guess.

    With bike lights, more lumens = more money (like cars), even though it really doesn't cost much more to build. Look at L&M Seca 700 and 1400 - the only difference is 3 more cells in the battery and a reprogrammed driver. Or a 1800+lm light I just built for $20 more than a ~400lm commuter light. It's just market segmentation and profit margin.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by mattthemuppet View Post
    Dominik - was there any thermal paste between that ribbed outer heatsink and the main casing? Did you run the light before dismantling to see how well the light heated up?
    There is no thermal paste, but the parts are pretty tight match => 65,9*C in mcpcb and 56,7*C on the case...

    Quote Originally Posted by mattthemuppet View Post
    Oh, and were you able to measure the current the LEDs were being driven at? The power figures quoted imply they're being driven above 1A, so there may be some grounds for their output claims
    You can find every information here : Magicshine MJ-872 review

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    Washed my bike after a wet ride with my MJ-872 on and no issues last night. All i have done it check and re screw on the front cover and replace the mount with electron one, with silicone seal.

    Im really happy with mine, with a XML on my helmet its a great combo, used it with a XML torch on Bars last night too, which was really good, gave the throw that the 872 lacks while still having a big pool of light upto 60 feet in front of bike.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dominik.M View Post
    There is no thermal paste, but the parts are pretty tight match => 65,9*C in mcpcb and 56,7*C on the case...
    It would still be better with thermal paste, believe me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dominik.M View Post
    You can find every information here : Magicshine MJ-872 review
    I wonder why they run the triple XP-G as a parallel setup with a buck driver, when they could use the same boost driver as the quad XP-G (even on low, a series triple would be 0.6-1V above the max voltage of the battery)? Seems like an odd decision, especially as the boost driver appears more efficient in this case and they would only have to produce 1 driver.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mattthemuppet View Post
    It would still be better with thermal paste, believe me.
    Believe me, I know

    Quote Originally Posted by mattthemuppet View Post
    Seems like an odd decision, especially as the boost driver appears more efficient in this case and they would only have to produce 1 driver.
    They already have the buck driver and they need it for their XM-L The buck version is probably a few cents cheaper...

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dominik.M View Post
    Believe me, I know
    Good. Glad we got that willy waving issue over and done with.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dominik.M View Post
    They already have the buck driver and they need it for their XM-L The buck version is probably a few cents cheaper...
    Guess so. Just seems a bit odd - I don't know of any other light (the L&M Seca perhaps) that runs LEDs in parallel strings.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mattthemuppet View Post
    Guess so. Just seems a bit odd - I don't know of any other light (the L&M Seca perhaps) that runs LEDs in parallel strings.
    That's because it's not a good design practice. Especially when the different LEDs are not really closely thermally coupled inside a single package like a P7 or MCE. You can't guarantee that the current will split evenly between the multiple LEDs.

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    Back with some comments about the optics on the MJ-872. Well it didn't take Magicshine long to figure out that people were not happy with the original optics. After looking at the MS website tonight it seems they are now offering the 872 with a clear optic over the emitters ( with frosting of the lens in between the emitters ). Not sure how that will change the beam pattern though. This is the same technique that Bikeray uses on the Bikeray III. I guess this means some new updated beam shots are in order if you think you might like the new set-up.

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    Anyone been able to compare the MJ-872 with the Bikeray IV?

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    I bought the 872 this weekend (actually exchanged it from 808e) and tried it out last night. Its definitely brighter than the 808 and is excellent up close for flood use. I doubt there is anything at this pricepoint that comes close to this thing. However, the spot use is still lacking and I'm sure this could be adjusted by altering the light. The flood is actually so bright though that you kind of forget about the lacking spot. I've ridden with a Niterider HID Moab for the last few years and typically ride solo with one helmet mounted light. I really liked the Niterider but its troubling that a $600 light lasted only 3 years so I don't think I'm going to deal with them any longer. Ideally, I would like to adjust this so I could get a better spot - any ideas?

  36. #36
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    I bought an 872 from Dealextreme and it has the new glass, but I can't really compare with the old glass. The light couldn't be better for what I need - I ride rocky technical trails and really need the flood beam.

    The problem is overheating. I live in Phoenix, and my summer night rides are often 100 degrees when I start at 8:30pm. On my last ride, I ran the light on next to lowest power (50% I think) and it had to shut down to the lowest power a few times to cool off. It was really quite annoying - even bombing down a hill it turned itself down.

    It looks like I can return it for DX for an exchange, but I'm wondering if it's just the design, and if it would be worthwhile for me to try to put some thermal paste on the inside of the heatsink ring. If so, how do you unscrew that lockring? Looks like it takes a special tool.

    Anyway, any advice you have would be helpful. Thanks.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by dobbs View Post
    I bought an 872 from Dealextreme and it has the new glass, but I can't really compare with the old glass. The light couldn't be better for what I need - I ride rocky technical trails and really need the flood beam.

    The problem is overheating. I live in Phoenix, and my summer night rides are often 100 degrees when I start at 8:30pm. On my last ride, I ran the light on next to lowest power (50% I think) and it had to shut down to the lowest power a few times to cool off. It was really quite annoying - even bombing down a hill it turned itself down.

    It looks like I can return it for DX for an exchange, but I'm wondering if it's just the design, and if it would be worthwhile for me to try to put some thermal paste on the inside of the heatsink ring. If so, how do you unscrew that lockring? Looks like it takes a special tool.

    Anyway, any advice you have would be helpful. Thanks.
    Wow...that's a real bummer. XP-G's do get very hot though. The only real option you might have would be to disconnect the thermal monitoring. Doing that would likely bake the led's and shorten their useful life but sadly you might not have any other better option. At least the light is not so expensive that if you burn it out it won't cost too much to replace it. Now just what you have to do to disconnect the thermal monitoring...I have no idea.

    This issue has me wondering just how well the Bikeray IV would hold up under those conditions. I'm really not sure if the BR IV has thermal monitoring but if it does the LED's it uses is the newer Rebel ES series that is designed to handle heat a little better. Anyway, food for thought.

    A while back I came up with an idea that might help someone that had heat issues. Basically my idea was to design a light that had a compartment behind the heat sink that could be used to store small pieces of dry ice. In essence this would keep the light cool ( very cool at that ) using CO*2. Dry ice can usually be easily obtained from various places. Where I work we have the "nugget" form readily available. ( which means I can get it for free... ) You would have to have the light modded for CO*2 use though. To prevent explosion it would have to have some small vents. In theory I think a couple of the small nuggets should last at least two or three hrs. Need I say, Dry ice is super cold and will actual burn you if you touch it. No telling what it would do to electronic components if directly exposed to the evaporated CO*2....Anyway, more food for thought.

    In the long run you might be better just running two cheap ( D/X cheap ) Standard MagicShines on low ( on the bars with a Y-cable ) and using the combined light to get you by. ( or option B ) Run your current light on low or mid low and use a cheap P-7 or XM-L torch ( which has no thermal monitoring ) to supplement the 872. ( which is what I would probably do ). Hope this helps. Cat.

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    I'm surprised Cat - given your previous experience I thought you might have suggested water cooling

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cat-man-do View Post
    A while back I came up with an idea that might help someone that had heat issues. Basically my idea was to design a light that had a compartment behind the heat sink that could be used to store small pieces of dry ice. In essence this would keep the light cool ( very cool at that ) using CO*2. Dry ice can usually be easily obtained from various places. Where I work we have the "nugget" form readily available. ( which means I can get it for free... ) You would have to have the light modded for CO*2 use though. To prevent explosion [ ] it would have to have some small vents. In theory I think a couple of the small nuggets should last at least two or three hrs. Need I say, Dry ice is super cold and will actual burn you if you touch it. No telling what it would do to electronic components if directly exposed to the evaporated CO*2....Anyway, more food for thought.
    Cat man, you're giving Wile E. Coyote a run for his money!

    Hold it right there, please, while I go fetch the popcorn. This is gonna be good.

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    I also live in the Phoenix area and run a BikeRay IV on the bars and a MS808e on my helmet. So far the BR IV has worked perfectly (although I wouldn't know otherwise unless it just quit) with one exception. I tried running both lights on the bar with a y connector and one Goeman 6ah battery and both battery life indicators turned red and the thermal monitoring on the 808 head kicked in. Everything went back to normal when I turned one of the lights off. Different current draw on the light heads, too much power draw, too small wire guage on the y connector, or maybe some safety feature on the battery? I don't know but I do know it wasn't overheating.
    I am interested in how the MS872 compares with my BR IV. I initially tried to order a LIGHTnGO foride with no luck. Maybe someone can do a beamshot comparison?

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    So, to follow up, I mounted a dry ice cooler on it last night and it blew up in my face, but the exploding MagicShine battery offset the ice explosion....

    Actually, I did ride with it last night and it went a lot better. It was a few degrees cooler oustide and I kept the light cool in the house until it was time to leave, instead of mounted to the bike in the hot garage like last time. Then I ran it on the 50% setting most of the time, which is more than enough light. It did reduce power twice, but that's a lot better than the last time I was out.

    I figured out how to remove the end caps with spread open needle nose pliers and I plan to replace the thermal paste on the led pcb and also add some to the inside of the heatsink ring so heat can transfer better.

    Since you guys sound interested, I will follow up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dobbs View Post
    .... Then I ran it on the 50% setting most of the time, which is more than enough light. It did reduce power twice, but that's a lot better than the last time I was out.

    I figured out how to remove the end caps with spread open needle nose pliers and I plan to replace the thermal paste on the led pcb and also add some to the inside of the heatsink ring so heat can transfer better.

    Since you guys sound interested, I will follow up.
    Let us know how well it does once you mod the heat sink.

    Find Bruce said:
    I'm surprised Cat - given your previous experience I thought you might have suggested water cooling.
    Bruce: That idea has already been talked about on forum as has fan cooling. No one has built a water cooled light but someone DID build a fan cooled light. I thought CO*2 cooling was a novel idea as it requires no power source. (** and for the truly skilled, an adaption using CO*2 air cartridges would be interesting ) Keep in mind folks this is just an idea in passing for the DIY'ers who like to try ( or hear about ) new original ideas. Personally I have no need for such a light but if I lived in a desert I would consider it if I had no other options. It wouldn't have to look good - just work. ....Yes, I know Bruce, you were just being funny. Once again, if I had to ride it that kind of heat it would likely kill me anyway.

    MrMole said:
    I also live in the Phoenix area and run a BikeRay IV on the bars and a MS808e on my helmet. So far the BR IV has worked perfectly (although I wouldn't know otherwise unless it just quit) with one exception. I tried running both lights on the bar with a y connector and one Goeman 6ah battery and both battery life indicators turned red and the thermal monitoring on the 808 head kicked in. Everything went back to normal when I turned one of the lights off...
    Glad to hear the Bikeray IV can handle the heat. Not much rain out that way so you should be good.
    Yeah, it doesn't surprise me that the 6.0 battery would have problems running both lights. Did you try using the original Bikeray battery with the Y-connector? You might have to go with a 6-cell battery.

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    Hi Dobbs,
    I've been thinking about your lights problem and I think if I were you I'd return it for a new head before you try modifying it. Maybe there's something wrong with the thermal monitor in your light. I know several people who ride T100 with dual 808e's
    on single speeds (which keeps the speeds low) and between us I'm the only one who's had the termal monitor kick down the light (the y-cable thing). My BR IV (which I always run on high) at least has the same emitters as yor 872 and runs cooler to the touch than
    than my 808e. Maybe your thermal monitor is just kicking in too soon. Anyway you shouldn't have to run your light at 50% power to get it to work right! Good luck.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MRMOLE View Post
    ....My BR IV (which I always run on high) at least has the same emitters as yor 872 and runs cooler to the touch than
    than my 808e. Maybe your thermal monitor is just kicking in too soon. Anyway you shouldn't have to run your light at 50% power to get it to work right! Good luck.
    Judging from the MS 872 review done by Dominik the 872 is built quite differently from the Bikeray IV. The heat sink on the BR IV is connected directly to the outer shell while the MS 872 uses some sort of sleeve assembly. That being the case I'm not sure how well the heat is transferring to the outer shell of the MS. Plus the MS 872 is using Cree XP-G's vs. the BR IV's use of the Philips/Luxeon Rebel ES emitters. XPG emitters get very hot. The Rebel ES emitters have different thermal characteristics that enable them to handle heat a little better. This might give the BR IV a better performance edge in a warmer environment. Of course something could be wrong with the light that Dobbs has but we can't really know for sure unless there are other 872's to compare it to in the same environment.

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    OK, so my follow up after a few more rides with the mj-872 is positive. I dismantled the light head and added some high quality thermal paste to the back of the LED pcb that contacts the metal frame. Then I slid the heat fin "ring" as far back as a I could without having the remove the wires. (The dude that completely took it part for the review above removed the wires, which allowed complete removal of the ring) Since I wasn't able to access the entire underside of the heat fin ring, I spread some paste around underneath where it would be slid into place for better heat conducting.

    So I then tightened the whole thing back down. In the process I overtightened the front retaining ring and cracked the lens/reflector. Duh. That made me feel dumb. It still worked fine with the cracks and I contacted MagicShine directly and ordered a replacement.

    I have done two night rides in similar heat to my previous rides, unfortunately. I ran the light at the 50% power the entire rides without any power downs for cooling. The light is so good at that level that I would be happy even if it didn't go any higher when it's hot out. I will try higher levels on future rides, but I feel satisfied with the light now. Would I buy it again over a BikeRay 4? Not sure. I wish the BikeRay had more levels besides high and low... That's probably the only thing that would hold me back.

    All this being said, the flood light nature of the light is outstanding. With this light I can clean stuff on my local rocky trails that I wasn't with my previous lights. I will never again ride without a flood type light for mountain biking... I hope.

  46. #46
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    Follow up #2 - I rode last night with the mj-872 and it was way hot. Hotter than the other rides I've done with it - it was 105 on my truck's thermometer when I left at 8:40. I kept the light on 50% for the climbs and 75% for the downhill and faster moving stuff and it was fine. I was also careful to turn it off whenever I stopped, even for a minute.

    I moved it up to 75% on the climb and it did overheat and drop down, but honestly, the 75% is unnecessary on a slow climb. I also set it at 100% for some fast downhills and then turned it down after the downhill. There's not a huge light output difference between 75 and 100.

    To repeat my comments about how nice it is for technical stuff, I cleaned my local 20 minute techy climb last night - something I've done in the day, but never at night before.

    I'd buy it again, though probably from Geoman this time for a few different reasons.

    Happy Trails.

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    Cross post from a different thread. Just posted here since the description of the thread is more along the lines of my review.

    This for road-based use:

    First Impressions, more to follow once I get a few rides in:

    I was going to compare along side my preferred helmet light (Dinotte 400L) but I leant it out and could not get it here in time to shoot pics with it. But my experience is that the MS900 dwarfs the 400L in the hotspot and by my eyes is about 2x the light making the 400L more like 300 lumens (assuming the MS900 is around 600)

    I used to MTB but kids and convenience trump my will to ride in the dark on the trail. So what you have here is what I would see most nights (city/suburb surface streets). Take my shots and my opinion with a grain of salt.

    IMHO, road riding demands more, not less light than off-road. Competing car lights, any kind of wet surface, and streetlights severly impeed my ability to ID obsticles and find clean tarmac. Riding on the streets in the rain is especially sketchy as wet road reflect the light and I would guess my usable visible light on the road about 25% of what my lights look like in the dry.

    Camera Settings:
    F4, 100ISO, WB-Sunlight, TV-6sec, apx 38mm focal
    All batteries freshly charged

    Control:


    Romisen
    Romisen RC-KF 3~8V Versatile Cree Flashlight (1x18650/3xAAA/2xCR123) - Free Shipping - DealExtreme
    About 120 lumens


    MS900 on High (apx 600L)


    Two MS900's on High (apx 1200L)


    MS 872 on High (apx 1000L)



    Same setup, but with a different focal length to show the backset beam patterns better
    Apx 16mm focal

    Romisen


    MS900 on High


    Two MS900's on High


    MS-872 on High


    MS872 + MS900 on High


    Overall impressions:

    Build quality on the new light is better by outward appearances. I did not tear it apart to check intermals for swarf. The front lens on the MS872 is plastic so you have to be a bit more careful with it than the MS900's since those are glass.

    The flood is nice, and on the road, I think it near ideal. Yes it throws some light above the horrizon and it may be bright for cars.... but I like the quality of the light. Its very smooth, and lack the rings and dropouts that the MS900 has. Paired with my Dinotte 400L I think I will be quite happy with the M872 alone w/o a paired up MS900. I suppose if I want to be truely annoying I could run all 4 lights and have a theoretical 2500 lumens, but being that they all are cone beams, and have no cutoff for other drivers, I find no reason to run that much light on the road unless perhaps I am in a downpour.

    The hotspot in the center on my MS900 tended to make me focus on just the stuff in that small area... effectively narrowing my vision when in fact I like to keep my perspective as wide as possible. The MS-872 allows me to scan far better which I like. I still want a spot on my head for directional light however....

    Looking at the pics, I would argue that the MS-872 VS dual MS900's (not the XML version) has nearly the same amount of light, just with a different beam pattern/distribution.

    Will report back more once I have a few more rides in.

    Note about the focal length. I think 38mm is closer to what I would see without scanning. Whereas 16mm is never really a realistic on-bike viewing perspective. It was thrown in there to just show beam pattern, as well as where a lot of light is going outside the visisble area on the 38mm shots.

    Cheers to Geoman for their great customer service and wonderful communication. I don't think I will be purchasing a light from any other dealer other than them for the forseeable future.

    -Jeff

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    Quote Originally Posted by znomit View Post
    Perhaps with a tighter optic?
    I was informed this 856 light has the exact same beam pattern (25 degree) as the new 872with clear optic...however due to it's design and slightly larger size (4.6mm larger outer diameter) it has better cooling which is obviously an issue with the 872. Currently it's really a bar mount light and comes with a neat bracket but they are working on an o-ring mount and well..people are creative. Maybe not as spiffy looking as the 872 but I'm fine with that if it cools better and doesn't overheat. Thoughts....

    Anyone have any feedback on the new MS 5.6ah battery pack with Samsung cells? Basic hard case with no back lit display...fine by me.
    2013 Banshee Spitfire V2 650b

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by skidad View Post




    I was informed this 856 light has the exact same beam pattern (25 degree) as the new 872with clear optic...however due to it's design and slightly larger size (4.6mm larger outer diameter) it has better cooling which is obviously an issue with the 872. Currently it's really a bar mount light and comes with a neat bracket but they are working on an o-ring mount and well..people are creative. Maybe not as spiffy looking as the 872 but I'm fine with that if it cools better and doesn't overheat. Thoughts....

    Anyone have any feedback on the new MS 5.6ah battery pack with Samsung cells? Basic hard case with no back lit display...fine by me.
    I actually find this version to look better than the 872 and it appears to have far better cooling from the light head.

    Ironically I don't like the look of the mount at all.

    In the eye of the beholder right.
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    Quote Originally Posted by randyharris View Post
    I actually find this version to look better than the 872 and it appears to have far better cooling from the light head.

    Ironically I don't like the look of the mount at all.

    In the eye of the beholder right.
    i think that lighthead with an oring mount would be perfect
    Quote Originally Posted by HamfisT
    I understand that engineering has value in and of itself. But in the end, it's still just a pile of aluminum tubes.

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    Thank you very much for the review, OP.

    Does anyone know what I can expect regarding water resistance for the 872 with GMG battery? Was thinking of ordering one to pair with my Lupine Piko, want to make sure it can handle rain and such.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nick d View Post
    i think that lighthead with an oring mount would be perfect
    I was told there is one in the works.

    I'm sure with a little work many mounts could be adapted to this light vs the handlebar mount they have now which is a bit tall.

    2013 Banshee Spitfire V2 650b

  53. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by skidad View Post
    I was told there is one in the works.

    I'm sure with a little work many mounts could be adapted to this light vs the handlebar mount they have now which is a bit tall.

    ]
    If you look at the picture you'll see that it is not mounted on "Actual" bike handlebars which makes it look taller because there's no stem. Still, the mount might be a little tall as you said compared to others. You could always adapt the light to other mounts which shouldn't be a problem. Niterider makes an off-set mount which should work very well although it is a bit expensive ($29 ). I have a Bikeray IV mounted on one and it rocks.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cat-man-do View Post
    If you look at the picture you'll see that it is not mounted on "Actual" bike handlebars which makes it look taller because there's no stem. Still, the mount might be a little tall as you said compared to others. You could always adapt the light to other mounts which shouldn't be a problem. Niterider makes an off-set mount which should work very well although it is a bit expensive ($29 ). I have a Bikeray IV mounted on one and it rocks.

    That style mount came with my MJ836 lights I have. They're not just a bit tall but also pretty flimsy and let the light bounce around a bit too much. I ended up buying a couple of these Planet Bike mounts:

    I had to swap the slide parts of the MS mounts onto the PB ones because they weren't an exact match. But the PB mount is much more secure.

    The Bikeray handlebar mounts that GeomanGear sells should work too.


  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by dobbs View Post
    I bought an 872 from Dealextreme and it has the new glass, but I can't really compare with the old glass. The light couldn't be better for what I need - I ride rocky technical trails and really need the flood beam.

    The problem is overheating. I live in Phoenix, and my summer night rides are often 100 degrees when I start at 8:30pm. On my last ride, I ran the light on next to lowest power (50% I think) and it had to shut down to the lowest power a few times to cool off. It was really quite annoying - even bombing down a hill it turned itself down.

    It looks like I can return it for DX for an exchange, but I'm wondering if it's just the design, and if it would be worthwhile for me to try to put some thermal paste on the inside of the heatsink ring. If so, how do you unscrew that lockring? Looks like it takes a special tool.

    Anyway, any advice you have would be helpful. Thanks.
    These sorts of things are the problem for me and why I'm perfectly content to spend more money on reliable lights of better design. I've been stuck in dark rural mosquito infested areas with a failed light. Believe me, at at time like that the marginal incremental cost of a good light seems pretty negligible. (It's also the reason to always have a backup light even with a good light.) The whole thing is just an unsavory and dangerous experience that the incremental money more than makes up for.

    J.

  56. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
    These sorts of things are the problem for me and why I'm perfectly content to spend more money on reliable lights of better design. I've been stuck in dark rural mosquito infested areas with a failed light. Believe me, at at time like that the marginal incremental cost of a good light seems pretty negligible. (It's also the reason to always have a backup light even with a good light.) The whole thing is just an unsavory and dangerous experience that the incremental money more than makes up for.

    J.
    I would alleviate dangerous and unsavory with a second light. Beyond that, define "incremental"
    Also can you speak personally to running your better light in 100+ degree heat for an hour or more on high..............
    CDT

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    Quote Originally Posted by CdaleTony View Post
    I would alleviate dangerous and unsavory with a second light. Beyond that, define "incremental"
    Also can you speak personally to running your better light in 100+ degree heat for an hour or more on high..............
    CDT
    I've run my Light & Motion lights in 100+ many many times here in Phoenix, on FULL, never an issue as described with the 872.
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  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by CdaleTony View Post
    I would alleviate dangerous and unsavory with a second light. Beyond that, define "incremental"
    Also can you speak personally to running your better light in 100+ degree heat for an hour or more on high..............
    CDT
    Don't have too - see post below. Perfect example.

    Mine was a failed battery.

    Incremental is the cost difference between what the cheap stuff costs and what the good stuff costs.

    When you're in the dark, miserable, no longer moving fast, and getting eaten alive by bugs, the incremental cost difference does not seem like a big deal anymore (at least to me). As well, riding home on an emergency light over rural highways where visibility to traffic is key, is not good with an emergency light and, maybe I'm wrong here, most of us are not going out with two complete sets of lights. Coming home over the 10 miles of unlit rural windy roads with a smaller light is not safe, IMO. The incremental cost will not even come close to the cost of an accident or injury.

    I, too, was more worried about the incremental cost until I got caught out. I ride with, and find I need, lots of light. Riding out with marginal light is still not my idea of equivalent safety or fun. So, I want max reliability. So, I buy the better stuff. YMMV - until you get caught out.

    I don't have to take the cheap route, so I don't.

    J.

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
    Don't have too - see post below. Perfect example.

    Mine was a failed battery.

    Incremental is the cost difference between what the cheap stuff costs and what the good stuff costs.

    When you're in the dark, miserable, no longer moving fast, and getting eaten alive by bugs, the incremental cost difference does not seem like a big deal anymore (at least to me). As well, riding home on an emergency light over rural highways where visibility to traffic is key, is not good with an emergency light and, maybe I'm wrong here, most of us are not going out with two complete sets of lights. Coming home over the 10 miles of unlit rural windy roads with a smaller light is not safe, IMO. The incremental cost will not even come close to the cost of an accident or injury.

    I, too, was more worried about the incremental cost until I got caught out. I ride with, and find I need, lots of light. Riding out with marginal light is still not my idea of equivalent safety or fun. So, I want max reliability. So, I buy the better stuff. YMMV - until you get caught out.

    I don't have to take the cheap route, so I don't.

    J.
    That pretty much sums it up then. Incremental to me isnt double or triple the price. 10 or 15% is 'incremental' to me. I could afford a $400 light, but probably not 2. I prefer (in my northern climate) to run two $89 lights... Or heck even 2 $150 lights...
    CDT
    YMMV

  60. #60
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    Right. We have different ideas about incremental cost and the value it provides.

    I will say this - my definition of cheap - changed after I had this incident. There is false economy and buying marginally constructed marginally reliable lights is just false economy for me. If you think about the consequences of a failed light at a critical time see what a catastrophe it could be.

    BTW, I live in a northern climate too- Minnesota. Battery quality is a big issue here too for riding through the cold season. There are all sorts of issues with electronics in this application, heat is only one of them. There is cold, vibration, humidity, battery, etc... Given the time (and the desire), I could think of many.

    Look at the teardown pictures of this light above - all the short cuts are taken: THe machining/internal construction is a mess (i.e. look at the holes drilled in the aluminum plate), lack of thermal goo for heat transfer, lack of seal on case components and switch etc.. If I had the inclination it'd be fun to put this through a temp cycle/vibration test. I'm sure that would show a short predicted lifespan. If so, that begs the question of what happens when it fails? Are you just sitting at a stop sign or are you on a fast downhill on highly technical terrain when it all goes dark? That's a gamble I'm interested in making sure the odds are way in my favor - hence I'm willing to pay for reliability and quality.


    J.

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    I would rather go with the cheap light, problems waterproofing,overheating can be overcome with a bit of DIY, as far as reliability the most reliable option is in quantity i would put more trust in 2 cheaper lights rather than a single expensive one and when you can get something like 4 or more mj-872s and batteries for a single equlivant in a high end brand well bit of a no brainer to me.

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by HellToupee View Post
    I would rather go with the cheap light, problems waterproofing,overheating can be overcome with a bit of DIY, as far as reliability the most reliable option is in quantity i would put more trust in 2 cheaper lights rather than a single expensive one and when you can get something like 4 or more mj-872s and batteries for a single equlivant in a high end brand well bit of a no brainer to me.
    It's not a choice between one high end and two low end. It's a choice between two lights either way. If you ride with a single light, you're in big trouble if that light goes out. In many cases you might be in BIG trouble very easily. My point was that you are still in a dangerous position getting home with one less bright light in many cases (visibility, traffic, road hazards etc...). But the real hazard - and this is where it really matters for reliability - is if your light fails at a dangerous time even if you have two lights on. For example, having one of my lights fail while descending at 30mph on a road would be a very big problem. On a trail, it's even worse. The quick change in brightness would be disorienting and a surprise.

    So, saying that happens - and I'm not saying it would, this is a game of statistics and probability over a statistically significant number of units - the potential for catastrophe is high even though the probability may be low. If that chance is twice as much (and it's probably a lot more than that), then that's a time when, after it occurs when I might be thinking that that incremental cost was not so much after all. That's also a risk I could have easily reduced but didn't, i.e. it was under my control to resolve.

    So, we all make our choices. Having been close to that situation and realizing how dangerous it can be, I'm not willing to take the risk. Just not worth it to me to save a few dollars.

    J.

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by HellToupee View Post
    I would rather go with the cheap light, problems waterproofing,overheating can be overcome with a bit of DIY, as far as reliability the most reliable option is in quantity i would put more trust in 2 cheaper lights rather than a single expensive one and when you can get something like 4 or more mj-872s and batteries for a single equlivant in a high end brand well bit of a no brainer to me.
    It's a choice we all make, there is no universally correct decision. As with most things the higher quality options tend to cost more, we all have to decide if the extra expense is justified for our use. I think it is wrong when people preach that the high or low cost route is the best, it depends on several factors including budget.

    It's a no-brainier to me, I use my light 3 times a week most of the year and I value the design and features of the premium lights so that's what I buy some of the guys I ride with use Magicshine, and they just shrug if they have issues - to them it was worth the price of admission. I plan on using my new Lupine Piko and DiNotte 1200L-Plus for many years to come.
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    That's right. I'm the same way - my lights are used 3 or more times per week too. Every minute I can steal to ride my bike is important to me in the fall. I also can't afford to get hurt because I have no recuperation time before ski season starts and then it's 4-5 days a week on skis. Missing any time on either due to injury is a bigger problem than a couple of hundred dollars (i.e. I see it as a very low incremental cost).

    J.

  65. #65
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    You guys are getting off topic yes you are preaching no one gives a ***** how much you ride. Ive had plenty of big name lights fail on me.via either light head or battery...
    this thread is about MJ872 which neither of you seem to have any personal experience with.
    lets get this thread back on topic,,,,
    Ive been using this lighthead for about a month now with ZERO issues. yes 2 to 3 times a week. anytime you have a lighthead this small kicking out this many lumens its going to get hot DUH!!!!!!!!!!! you have to use it accordingly at 50% this is all most will need kick it up when you need it and its sickly bright
    Last edited by Rakuman; 09-18-2011 at 08:57 PM.
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  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
    ....So, saying that happens - and I'm not saying it would, this is a game of statistics and probability over a statistically significant number of units - the potential for catastrophe is high even though the probability may be low. If that chance is twice as much (and it's probably a lot more than that), then that's a time when, after it occurs when I might be thinking that that incremental cost was not so much after all. That's also a risk I could have easily reduced but didn't, i.e. it was under my control to resolve.

    So, we all make our choices. Having been close to that situation and realizing how dangerous it can be, I'm not willing to take the risk. Just not worth it to me to save a few dollars.

    J.
    Yes, we all make choices and we all make decisions based on issues important to us. When it comes to stuff like this there is no , "One shoe fits all". That being said there are different strategies to achieve similar goals as far as safety and reliability go. One approach is to take the high $$$ road with the idea being stuff that cost more but is more time tested and therefore more reliable. You'll get no argument from me along that line of thought. If you can afford it than it makes good sense. Then there's the approach of "safety in numbers". If one light fails you have back-ups. This is the approach I usually take although I have good reliable lights as well. I'm lucky because I own multiple light sets so I can mix and match.

    My usual set-up is thus: One main ( reliable/proven ) light on the bars accompanied by a proven multi-mode torch (XML ) on the other side. Then I use something on the helmet, either a torch or bike light depending on the need. Sometimes I will use three cheaper lights. I have no problem with this because all the stuff I have works and it would be most unusual for everything I have to fail but with that said I never ride at night without multiple lights regardless of what lights I use.

    Regardless of what lights you use all lights use batteries. If you forgot your battery or forgot to charge the battery..well...Crap happens. Like most people on forum here I have experienced what is like to suddenly be without lights. Worse case scenarios vary but I've had lights suddenly go out while on steep downhills..... ( Ah, those old Halogen days ... ) I also know the peril of being caught in the woods and suddenly realize that you have no lights and the sun is dropping fast. For me it's gotten to the point where if I think I'm going to do a late day run ( not unusual for me ) I'll at least carry a couple torches along and 2 extra cells. Both are XM-L mult-mode torches, have decent beam patterns and are very light weight. About 1300 lumen total for both - give or take 150lm.

    I took a solemn vowel years ago to never be caught without needing a light source while on my bike. So far I've kept that vowel ( with no help from Vanna.. ) and been fortunate enough to have never been without a needed light source ( or enough juice to run them ).......knock on wood.

    Just remember, regardless of what you own....Stuff happens.

  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
    It's not a choice between one high end and two low end. It's a choice between two lights either way. If you ride with a single light, you're in big trouble if that light goes out. For example, having one of my lights fail while descending at 30mph on a road would be a very big problem. On a trail, it's even worse. The quick change in brightness would be disorienting and a surprise.
    im picturing you careening down a mountain one handed trying to mount up a back-up light at full speed.

    this is where we use those funny looking levers on the handlebars that create friction on those shiny disc's bolted to the wheels. doing this properly you can actually slow your bicycle to a stop and allow you to assess your situation.

    after assessing the situation and realizing you no longer have the same amount of light, you can adjust your speed accordingly for the remainder of the trail with whatever backup light you have or do not have. once you get home you can trouble shoot your light and find out what you need to do to fix/replace whatever it is that failed. if you need to carry 14 lights on you at all times because you'll be damned if a light malfunction is going to ruin a single ride maybe its time to live life with a little moderation. go home, have a beer, look at what you need to fix or upgrade and not worry about not getting a "complete" ride in.
    Gary Fisher HiFi Deluxe 29er

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    You can't be serious. You mean that you are able, in pitch black at high speed with complete safety to bring your bike to rapid stop with no issues? If so, you are a better man than I.

    J.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Waltah View Post
    i
    this is where we use those funny looking levers on the handlebars that create friction on those shiny disc's bolted to the wheels. doing this properly you can actually slow your bicycle to a stop and allow you to assess your situation.

    after assessing the situation and realizing you no longer have the same amount of light, you can adjust your speed accordingly for the remainder of the trail with whatever backup light you have or do not have.
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
    You can't be serious. You mean that you are able, in pitch black at high speed with complete safety to bring your bike to rapid stop with no issues? If so, you are a better man than I.

    J.
    .....
    Gary Fisher HiFi Deluxe 29er

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    we wouldn't be in pitch black as we wouldnt be usingjust one fancy light which no matter how expensive is a single point of failure.

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    Congrats on the craptastic thread derailling, gentlemen

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    My take on it....two upfront (spot and flood) and two rear. Two batteries. Gives flexibility and backups. No problems with any light heads overheating. One rear did fail due to glass rotating with bezel and pulled internal wires away resulting in a short that may have damaged the battery. I replaced both and am more careful turning bezel (a weakness in design IMO).


  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by XJaredX View Post
    Congrats on the craptastic thread derailling, gentlemen



    Back to the original topic. I have ridden with the light on High on multiple rides now, all road, all when temps are <75 deg.... no drop in power on my end.

    I hooked up the light to the Dinotte 2-cell battery packs. On a full charge, the battery life indicator when running on a two cell goes from green, to blue, to orange, to red in a matter of about a minute. It must be pulling a ton of juice to drop the voltage like that on the two cell. If run on high for > 15 min, it starts to flash red (indicating < 15% battery life if I recall).

    I was just goffing off in the back yard with the light so did not run a full test on how long the 872 could run on a two cell battery.

    When road riding, I want minimum weight and bulk. I know I won't be any faster on the bike running a 2c vs a 4c battery, but I don't like that much crap strapped to my bars.

    I did get my 400L I loaned out to a friend back and will post pic's of the combo soon.... but the 400L gets lost in the blast of light the 872 puts out on high. Comparitvely, it makes the 400L look like a flashlight. Makes me want to upgrade the LED's in the 400L to the up the power to a true 400L (rather than the 250-300L others have stated this light head actually produces)

  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by hiroshima View Post
    I hooked up the light to the Dinotte 2-cell battery packs. On a full charge, the battery life indicator when running on a two cell goes from green, to blue, to orange, to red in a matter of about a minute. It must be pulling a ton of juice to drop the voltage like that on the two cell. If run on high for > 15 min, it starts to flash red (indicating < 15% battery life if I recall).

    I was just goffing off in the back yard with the light so did not run a full test on how long the 872 could run on a two cell battery.
    Do you know what the runtime is on the 4 cell battery it came with? (running on full / high mode)
    ONE SHOX, ONE GEAR, LOTS of FUN! www.TrailFu.com My Rides

  75. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by randyharris View Post
    Do you know what the runtime is on the 4 cell battery it came with? (running on full / high mode)
    4.5 battery
    Runtime: 1.75 hours on High (Level 4), 2.5 hours on Level 3, 3.5 hours on Level 2, 5.75 hours on Low (Level 1)
    6.0 battery
    Runtime: 2.4 hours on High (Level 4), 3.5 hours on Level 3, 5 hours on Level 2, 7.5 hours on Low (Level 1)
    these are off geomans site and I have tested them myself and get close to the same times.
    on the indicator going to red on high these lights give false battery indicator readings geoman states that clearly on his site
    A 5 stage power meter - as the battery depletes from 100% the backlit button will change colors from Green(100%) - Blue(95 - 70%) - Yellow(70 - 50%) - Red(50 - 5%) - Flashing Red(5 - 0%). ** Note results may vary as lightheads were designed after the battery, runtime estimates below are accurate however in the higher modes of output the indicator can provide incorrect readings.


    After it goes red on the 6.0 I get 1 hour + so i don't worry about what the indicator says
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  76. #76
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    From another forum

    For those of you who have gotten the replacement batteries - The LED indicator might turn RED sooner than expected even though you have a fully charged pack.

    Here is the official explanation from Geomangear:

    "We understand you are seeing some variations in the color indicator. We have referred this issue to our battery manufacturer and they have examined the discharge rates of the Panasonic cells we use and the other cells that Magicshine has used in a number of battery packs. The cells from different manufacturers discharge at different rates and the voltage meter in the lighthead was designed to compliment the chinese cells rather than the Panasonic cells we use. The burntime will be the same as listed however the color indicators will change faster with the Panasonic cells. We have posted color change estimates on our website that you might see with the GeoManGear battery packs.

    Our battery pack manufacturer is looking at solutions to this issue however we will only use the Panasonic cells and we don't manufacture the lightheads so it will be a difficult issue to overcome.

    We are not seeing any diminished runtime, only lighthead indicator colors are showing change earlier than the original Chinese battery packs as discussed above.

    Thanks
    GeoManGear"



    ***

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    In regards to weatherproofing. Clear GE silicone caulk is good up to at least 400F, so that should make for a bombproof seal.

    In regards to heating problems. There is a very thermally conductive "caulk" that is used to conduct heat from electronic devices, like power amps, to their heat sinks. Using this and some aluminum tubing one should be able to wrap 12-20 4-8" tubes around the 872 and dramatically increase the size of the heat sink. Drilling holes along the sides of the tubes will make them even more effective, as will larger diameters.

    Old TV antenna rods should work well. Another ready source of quality aluminum is knitting needles. They come in many sizes and lengths, and even in double pointed versions. Again, drilling holes along the length of the tubes will help them dump heat.

    Some kind of funnel shaped air scoop might also help, as would a spray bottle attachment stuck into a hydration pack's mouth tube. Think water-cooled machine guns.

  78. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreyBard View Post
    In regards to weatherproofing. Clear GE silicone caulk is good up to at least 400F, so that should make for a bombproof seal.

    In regards to heating problems. There is a very thermally conductive "caulk" that is used to conduct heat from electronic devices, like power amps, to their heat sinks. Using this and some aluminum tubing one should be able to wrap 12-20 4-8" tubes around the 872 and dramatically increase the size of the heat sink. Drilling holes along the sides of the tubes will make them even more effective, as will larger diameters.

    Old TV antenna rods should work well. Another ready source of quality aluminum is knitting needles. They come in many sizes and lengths, and even in double pointed versions. Again, drilling holes along the length of the tubes will help them dump heat.

    Some kind of funnel shaped air scoop might also help, as would a spray bottle attachment stuck into a hydration pack's mouth tube. Think water-cooled machine guns.
    Huh, are you kidding me. Why should you have to do all that to a new light beside making the thing look hideous. You can buy the MJ-856 which has the exact same specs and beam pattern as the MJ-872 in a package that should cool much better. It's 4.6mm larger in diameter and for some maybe not as attractive as the 872 but that's the one I've ordered because clearly the 872 has some overheating issues.

    2013 Banshee Spitfire V2 650b

  79. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by skidad View Post
    Huh, are you kidding me. Why should you have to do all that to a new light beside making the thing look hideous. You can buy the MJ-856 which has the exact same specs and beam pattern as the MJ-872 in a package that should cool much better. It's 4.6mm larger in diameter and for some maybe not as attractive as the 872 but that's the one I've ordered because clearly the 872 has some overheating issues.
    One guy who has rides in 100 degree temps and has overheating issues does not mean the general user will. Ive used it in 90 with zero issues. I like this light so much I'm planning on getting another
    I always type in bold cuz I'm blind as a bat
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    Quote Originally Posted by skidad View Post
    Huh, are you kidding me. Why should you have to do all that to a new light beside making the thing look hideous. You can buy the MJ-856 which has the exact same specs and beam pattern as the MJ-872 in a package that should cool much better. It's 4.6mm larger in diameter and for some maybe not as attractive as the 872 but that's the one I've ordered because clearly the 872 has some overheating issues.
    I agree, I am not sure I want to slap green, yelllow, and pink knitting needles onto the sides of my light with caulking.... then drill them out....

    Night riding in CA, unless doing so in Death Valley, usually gets no hotter than 85.... and if its that hot (I am a woose) I wouldn't go....

    Overheating issues should be taken with an eye to your own local weather. I am Northern CA, Most nights, even when its 100 degs in the day.... drops to the 70's at night. Also consider road vs MTB where road speeds will help carry off heat from the light more efficiently.

    The light has not been around long enough for any true measure of reliability. My opinion is that the light may indeed get really hot internally. So much so that it will drastically shorten the life of the LED/driver/etc....

    *BUT*, in the last 7 years, I have purchased 5 different sets of lights.... all increasing light output with each iteration. I may not be the norm.... but I am willing to wager I will replace/upgrade the light long before it wears out on its own.

  81. #81
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    Man, you guys can really get testy about these things. I've done many rides with my MJ-872 over the last couple months since I bought it and worked on my overheating issues - and I love it. I usually go out with a MJ-808 strapped to the bar as well, but I never use it. I like the broad flood and smooth transition from the 872 even better than the two of them mixed together. Bright spots hurt technical riding ability IMO.

    If I were to buy another, and I may (my wife rides, too) I would get the MJ-856, or buy the MJ-872 from GeomanGear for the additional US support. I still think there is a possibility I have a bad unit, but it is working fine for my purposes.

    So, other than my 872 and 808, my other experiences with lights have been NiteRider. I got a set of two halogen lights back in 95 or so that were good at the time, and quite reliable. Then in the mid 2000s I bought a NR Blowtorch HID light. Heavy, and unreliable with a terrible flicker at speed. I've had two bulbs go out on me mid-ride. I would much rather spend the money on two Magicshines, than bet my ride on one expensive unit. Redundancy is good.

  82. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by dobbs View Post
    Man, you guys can really get testy about these things. I've done many rides with my MJ-872 over the last couple months since I bought it and worked on my overheating issues - and I love it. I usually go out with a MJ-808 strapped to the bar as well, but I never use it. I like the broad flood and smooth transition from the 872 even better than the two of them mixed together. Bright spots hurt technical riding ability IMO.

    If I were to buy another, and I may (my wife rides, too) I would get the MJ-856, or buy the MJ-872 from GeomanGear for the additional US support. I still think there is a possibility I have a bad unit, but it is working fine for my purposes.

    So, other than my 872 and 808, my other experiences with lights have been NiteRider. I got a set of two halogen lights back in 95 or so that were good at the time, and quite reliable. Then in the mid 2000s I bought a NR Blowtorch HID light. Heavy, and unreliable with a terrible flicker at speed. I've had two bulbs go out on me mid-ride. I would much rather spend the money on two Magicshines, than bet my ride on one expensive unit. Redundancy is good.
    Dont take may bold type as testy Im just blind and like to be able to see what Ive typed
    It does not matter which light you buy I just like to point out the facts.. that one guys issue isn't everyone's
    I always type in bold cuz I'm blind as a bat
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  83. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
    These sorts of things are the problem for me and why I'm perfectly content to spend more money on reliable lights of better design. I've been stuck in dark rural mosquito infested areas with a failed light. Believe me, at at time like that the marginal incremental cost of a good light seems pretty negligible. (It's also the reason to always have a backup light even with a good light.) The whole thing is just an unsavory and dangerous experience that the incremental money more than makes up for.

    J.
    I'm convinced that JohnJ80 feels the need to get involved with all the Magicshine/budget light threads to justify to himself for spending so much on his lights.

    Personally, if there was a product that I wasn't interested in for myself, I'd have very little to say about it, and certainly wouldn't spend countless time talking about it.

    But hey, I'm weird like that

  84. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by fightnut View Post
    I'm convinced that JohnJ80 feels the need to get involved with all the Magicshine/budget light threads to justify to himself for spending so much on his lights.

    Personally, if there was a product that I wasn't interested in for myself, I'd have very little to say about it, and certainly wouldn't spend countless time talking about it.

    But hey, I'm weird like that
    Seriously, what are the odds of both MagicShine lights failing on the same ride? Pretty damn low, I would think. Odds of my MJ-872 overheating on a 105 degree nightride - pretty high. But the solution is easy. Turn it off when you are not moving; don't run the light higher than 50% on a slow climb. Even when it has overheated, it's still usable, it just runs at a lower intensity.

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    Followup on my impressions of the light. Ran the road bike last night with 872 and MS900 on the bars + Dinotte 400L on the lid. Road ride, 20.2 ave with more than a few stops at red lights and a late night drop-off at the library. Did it at 11pm at night.

    Had all lights on high. Cars SLOWED down for me as I approached.... some slowed down and looked when going in the same direction... it was creepy since it was so late. All I think were just curious, and not malicious.

    Pushing close to 2000 lumnes out the front with a significant (probably 40%) going into the atmosphere. Approaching parked trailers I had a GREAT view of all their reflective tape so I know I had a lot of light above the horrizon. I pointed both bar lights down to hit about 25' in front of me. 50' seemed too far off and decreased intensity.

    The P7 alone used to be nice, but now that I have the 872 with a wide, smooth, and even swath of light,.... I am no longer happy with the P7 (or even a dual P7 setup). The bright center spot just draws the eye into too small of an area to really have a good scan of the ground. The 872 is awsome in that respect. Aimed ~25' in front of me, I have a solid and pretty even bar of light from my front wheel out beyond the center focus area of the light. The P7 can't hope to have such great coverage.

    The down-side is that this think probably dazzles other drivers.... hate to think what it would do to a unsuspecting cyclist going the wrong way in the bike lane (as often happens where I live). I would guess they would be blinded for a bit not making it safe for them or me.

    The 400L on the lid is nice, but with 2000 lumens, my guess is that my pupils we "stopping down" the light my eyes were seeing since it so damn bright. The 400L just can't keep up. Its usefull, but just marginally. Taking turns at speed, where my head is spotting my exit line, I can feel my eyes strain to try to adjust to he sudden drop in light. (going from 2000 to 250 lumens is a big drop).

    I rode on the levee where there are basically no lights... these lights rock. I can travel as fast as I want and do not fear not having enought reaction time to stop. Topped 33mph on the ride, no issues.

    I kinda wish it had more throw, but REALLY like the spread. I think the next step, if there is one, is to run two lights, one 872 and one spot with a pencil beam to blaze a path down the road.

  86. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by hiroshima View Post
    Followup on my impressions of the light. Ran the road bike last night with 872 and MS900 on the bars + Dinotte 400L on the lid. Road ride, 20.2 ave with more than a few stops at red lights and a late night drop-off at the library. Did it at 11pm at night.

    Had all lights on high. Cars SLOWED down for me as I approached.... some slowed down and looked when going in the same direction... it was creepy since it was so late. All I think were just curious, and not malicious.

    Pushing close to 2000 lumnes out the front with a significant (probably 40%) going into the atmosphere. Approaching parked trailers I had a GREAT view of all their reflective tape so I know I had a lot of light above the horrizon. I pointed both bar lights down to hit about 25' in front of me. 50' seemed too far off and decreased intensity.

    The P7 alone used to be nice, but now that I have the 872 with a wide, smooth, and even swath of light,.... I am no longer happy with the P7 (or even a dual P7 setup). The bright center spot just draws the eye into too small of an area to really have a good scan of the ground. The 872 is awsome in that respect. Aimed ~25' in front of me, I have a solid and pretty even bar of light from my front wheel out beyond the center focus area of the light. The P7 can't hope to have such great coverage.

    The down-side is that this think probably dazzles other drivers.... hate to think what it would do to a unsuspecting cyclist going the wrong way in the bike lane (as often happens where I live). I would guess they would be blinded for a bit not making it safe for them or me.

    The 400L on the lid is nice, but with 2000 lumens, my guess is that my pupils we "stopping down" the light my eyes were seeing since it so damn bright. The 400L just can't keep up. Its usefull, but just marginally. Taking turns at speed, where my head is spotting my exit line, I can feel my eyes strain to try to adjust to he sudden drop in light. (going from 2000 to 250 lumens is a big drop).

    I rode on the levee where there are basically no lights... these lights rock. I can travel as fast as I want and do not fear not having enought reaction time to stop. Topped 33mph on the ride, no issues.

    I kinda wish it had more throw, but REALLY like the spread. I think the next step, if there is one, is to run two lights, one 872 and one spot with a pencil beam to blaze a path down the road.
    Pair it with a XM-L next to it like lesoudeur and Me its unbelievably bright you don't miss much with that XM-L lighting everything within 100 yards and the 872 picking up everything close. I find myself going faster than I do in the day cuz the ruts don't look as deep
    I always type in bold cuz I'm blind as a bat
    For the Rich there is therapy!!!! for the rest of us we have Mountain Biking


  87. #87
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    LED surround blemish

    Ok, I just got my new MJ-856 (872 in different housing) and noticed maybe a little problem. Would like to get some experienced opinions as this is my first light.

    In the shiny area that surrounds 2 of the LED's there are small chips or blemishes. 1 on each of the LED surrounds. Not to big on either but looks like something that would happen if you tightened down to much on plastic and it chipped a little. Actually now that I look really close only 1 of the shiny area surrounds of the 4 LED's is really perfect without a blemish of some sort.

    I presume I should return this if it's gonna affect the light?

    Very speedy shipping from BrightStone in NC BTW and a brand new MS 5.6Ah battery with Samsung cells is now available. GeoMan doesn't plan to stock the MJ-856 version light.

    Thanks all
    Last edited by skidad; 09-22-2011 at 05:08 PM.
    2013 Banshee Spitfire V2 650b

  88. #88
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    New vs Old optic on the mj-872 Hi

    I got 2 MJ-872 with the "old" flod beam optic, have anyone compared the new optic with the old one. im close to order one to get mor pencilbeam on one of the lights.

    But have anyone seen both optics to compare the difference ?

    Regards

  89. #89
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    What about MJ-870?

    Hi,
    Anybody who has any impressions and experience with MJ-870? Every of you bought MJ-872 so I am the only person who ordered an MJ-870? (Ordered 3 weeks ago from DX, I will get it soon, I guess. I will give you some info if anyone is interested in. Anyway, I also have an updated MJ-808, not the Cree led one but the older P7 led version. Thus, I can do some comparison between those lights.)

  90. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by pena40 View Post
    New vs Old optic on the mj-872 Hi

    I got 2 MJ-872 with the "old" flod beam optic, have anyone compared the new optic with the old one. im close to order one to get mor pencilbeam on one of the lights.

    But have anyone seen both optics to compare the difference ?

    Regards
    There are lots of posts around with beamshots of the 872 but I have not seen a side by side between the old and new optic. Obviously the shots from the very beginning of this thread are the old optic and most likely more floody than the new one. Even so the beam on the new one is a 25 degree so pretty wide. Not sure how long the older optic version was in production but they must have changed it for a reason. Maybe you could get an exchange for the new optic light heads? GeoMan could probably answer this question best. Shoot him a PM or email.
    2013 Banshee Spitfire V2 650b

  91. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by pena40 View Post
    New vs Old optic on the mj-872 Hi

    I got 2 MJ-872 with the "old" flod beam optic, have anyone compared the new optic with the old one. im close to order one to get mor pencilbeam on one of the lights.

    But have anyone seen both optics to compare the difference ?

    Regards
    This light, with the new optic will never be a pencil beam. I have not had both versions, but I do have the current version (with the clear optic) and this is a flood light through-and-through. If you need a pencil beam, look to another light-head entirely. Geoman has spare clear lenses they were giving away a month or so back for those who had the old version. eMail them and they may still have some left.

  92. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by pena40 View Post
    New vs Old optic on the mj-872 Hi

    I got 2 MJ-872 with the "old" flod beam optic, have anyone compared the new optic with the old one. im close to order one to get mor pencilbeam on one of the lights.

    But have anyone seen both optics to compare the difference ?

    Regards
    Just recieved the new optic and i can say the new optic is much better in every way.

    Lux of the P7 37
    Lux of the XML 44
    Lux of the old optic 65
    Lux with new optic 85

    The beam pattern is much more uniform too, the old light is just a splurge of light, the new one has a defined flood, although the edges do have definition they fade out nicely.

    I did notice when changing the optic, the star had come off the body, if this is the case on lots of these lights, this may be a cause of everyones overheating issues.

    I find only low mode stays proper cool while riding, the other modes do get warm even when moving

  93. #93
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    Finally, I received my MJ-870. At this moment, I don't have any experience with it on the mountain trails, but I'm wondering about that the lamp is still equipped with the old lens and not with the new clear one... So I will try to find the way how to get the updated lens. Nevertheless, the build quality is much better than my old MJ-808's and in spite of that this model has 'only' 3 Cree XP-Gs, the light output is apparently much bigger than at my MJ-808. Can't wait to try it on the trails...

  94. #94
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    How to cool

    Quote Originally Posted by hiroshima View Post
    I agree, I am not sure I want to slap green, yelllow, and pink knitting needles onto the sides of my light with caulking.... then drill them out....

    Night riding in CA, unless doing so in Death Valley, usually gets no hotter than 85.... and if its that hot (I am a woose) I wouldn't go....

    Overheating issues should be taken with an eye to your own local weather. I am Northern CA, Most nights, even when its 100 degs in the day.... drops to the 70's at night. Also consider road vs MTB where road speeds will help carry off heat from the light more efficiently.

    The light has not been around long enough for any true measure of reliability. My opinion is that the light may indeed get really hot internally. So much so that it will drastically shorten the life of the LED/driver/etc....

    *BUT*, in the last 7 years, I have purchased 5 different sets of lights.... all increasing light output with each iteration. I may not be the norm.... but I am willing to wager I will replace/upgrade the light long before it wears out on its own.
    Interesting choice of colors there. Knitting needles come in all kinds of colors, so you'd pick one that's palatable.

    @hiroshima, A question was asked on the 1st page about cooling, and no response was given - other than the implied one of "dig a hole and bury the light you just paid good money for, and buy a new one". If you don't have a cooling issue, why comment? Clearly my post was not directed at you.

    Your response implies you have faith that the newly designed case will solve the problem. I doubt that is going to be true, because I've spent a lot of time studying how electronic devices are heat-sinked, and that case design is NOT very effective. It might look pretty, but it won't sink heat well. Most people will think it works super-awesome, because they didn't have a heat problem in the 1st place, just a lot of loose change burning a hole in their pockets.

    If your shiny new toy doesn't stay cool enough either, get back to me, I'm actually knowledgeable in this area and have some constructive ideas to offer. Even if they aren't pretty enough to put a sparkle in your eyes, they won't leave you stranded high on a mtn somewhere.

  95. #95
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    Redundancy is better

    Quote Originally Posted by dobbs View Post
    Man, you guys can really get testy about these things. I've done many rides with my MJ-872 over the last couple months since I bought it and worked on my overheating issues - and I love it. I usually go out with a MJ-808 strapped to the bar as well, but I never use it. I like the broad flood and smooth transition from the 872 even better than the two of them mixed together. Bright spots hurt technical riding ability IMO.

    If I were to buy another, and I may (my wife rides, too) I would get the MJ-856, or buy the MJ-872 from GeomanGear for the additional US support. I still think there is a possibility I have a bad unit, but it is working fine for my purposes.

    So, other than my 872 and 808, my other experiences with lights have been NiteRider. I got a set of two halogen lights back in 95 or so that were good at the time, and quite reliable. Then in the mid 2000s I bought a NR Blowtorch HID light. Heavy, and unreliable with a terrible flicker at speed. I've had two bulbs go out on me mid-ride. I would much rather spend the money on two Magicshines, than bet my ride on one expensive unit. Redundancy is good.
    I was going to make the same point. You can have completely redundant power and lamps and still more redundancy for taillights and last-ditch PB Blaze 2W up front.

    The chances that you'd be in the middle of a treacherous descent and have all of that fail at once are infinitesimal, and much less than the failure of any single device no matter how much it costs.

    If all of that fails at once, just relax and enjoy being whisked into another Galaxy by aliens who found you interesting, and decided to take you for a pet.

  96. #96
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    Mine just arrived! First ride tonight.




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    pulled the trigger for a 2600 lumens combo: 808E XML $ 872.

    Just cant wait to test them.

  98. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by skidad View Post
    Ok, I just got my new MJ-856 (872 in different housing) and noticed maybe a little problem. Would like to get some experienced opinions as this is my first light.

    In the shiny area that surrounds 2 of the LED's there are small chips or blemishes. 1 on each of the LED surrounds. Not to big on either but looks like something that would happen if you tightened down to much on plastic and it chipped a little. Actually now that I look really close only 1 of the shiny area surrounds of the 4 LED's is really perfect without a blemish of some sort.

    I presume I should return this if it's gonna affect the light?

    Very speedy shipping from BrightStone in NC BTW and a brand new MS 5.6Ah battery with Samsung cells is now available. GeoMan doesn't plan to stock the MJ-856 version light.

    Thanks all
    Well I got no answers to my question but I did end up returning the lamp head only to BrightStone Sports in NC and they returned to me a perfect MJ-856 lamp head ASAP. They have been great all through the order process with all my questions and were very apologetic about the 1st lamp head. They also gave me their advertised 5% discount when you spend $200 or more even when my order didn't hit the $200 mark. Nice...every bit helps.

    Link...BrightStoneSports - MagicShine Bike Light and Accessories | Magic Shine MJ-808 | MJ-808e | MJ-816 | MJ-818 | MJ-856 | MJ-872 | ...
    2013 Banshee Spitfire V2 650b

  99. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreyBard View Post
    If all of that fails at once, just relax and enjoy being whisked into another Galaxy by aliens who found you interesting, and decided to take you for a pet.

  100. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by skidad View Post
    I was told there is one in the works.

    I'm sure with a little work many mounts could be adapted to this light vs the handlebar mount they have now which is a bit tall.

    Ask and you shall receive....O-ring mount version now available of the MJ-856. The mount pictured above which I got is actually pretty nice and a bit better IMO with a few easy mods.

    MagicShine MJ-856b O-ring mount 1600 lumens LED Bike Light Set

    2013 Banshee Spitfire V2 650b

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