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  1. #51
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    Thank you very much for the review, OP.

    Does anyone know what I can expect regarding water resistance for the 872 with GMG battery? Was thinking of ordering one to pair with my Lupine Piko, want to make sure it can handle rain and such.

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by nick d View Post
    i think that lighthead with an oring mount would be perfect
    I was told there is one in the works.

    I'm sure with a little work many mounts could be adapted to this light vs the handlebar mount they have now which is a bit tall.

    2013 Banshee Spitfire V2 650b

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by skidad View Post
    I was told there is one in the works.

    I'm sure with a little work many mounts could be adapted to this light vs the handlebar mount they have now which is a bit tall.

    ]
    If you look at the picture you'll see that it is not mounted on "Actual" bike handlebars which makes it look taller because there's no stem. Still, the mount might be a little tall as you said compared to others. You could always adapt the light to other mounts which shouldn't be a problem. Niterider makes an off-set mount which should work very well although it is a bit expensive ($29 ). I have a Bikeray IV mounted on one and it rocks.

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cat-man-do View Post
    If you look at the picture you'll see that it is not mounted on "Actual" bike handlebars which makes it look taller because there's no stem. Still, the mount might be a little tall as you said compared to others. You could always adapt the light to other mounts which shouldn't be a problem. Niterider makes an off-set mount which should work very well although it is a bit expensive ($29 ). I have a Bikeray IV mounted on one and it rocks.

    That style mount came with my MJ836 lights I have. They're not just a bit tall but also pretty flimsy and let the light bounce around a bit too much. I ended up buying a couple of these Planet Bike mounts:

    I had to swap the slide parts of the MS mounts onto the PB ones because they weren't an exact match. But the PB mount is much more secure.

    The Bikeray handlebar mounts that GeomanGear sells should work too.


  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by dobbs View Post
    I bought an 872 from Dealextreme and it has the new glass, but I can't really compare with the old glass. The light couldn't be better for what I need - I ride rocky technical trails and really need the flood beam.

    The problem is overheating. I live in Phoenix, and my summer night rides are often 100 degrees when I start at 8:30pm. On my last ride, I ran the light on next to lowest power (50% I think) and it had to shut down to the lowest power a few times to cool off. It was really quite annoying - even bombing down a hill it turned itself down.

    It looks like I can return it for DX for an exchange, but I'm wondering if it's just the design, and if it would be worthwhile for me to try to put some thermal paste on the inside of the heatsink ring. If so, how do you unscrew that lockring? Looks like it takes a special tool.

    Anyway, any advice you have would be helpful. Thanks.
    These sorts of things are the problem for me and why I'm perfectly content to spend more money on reliable lights of better design. I've been stuck in dark rural mosquito infested areas with a failed light. Believe me, at at time like that the marginal incremental cost of a good light seems pretty negligible. (It's also the reason to always have a backup light even with a good light.) The whole thing is just an unsavory and dangerous experience that the incremental money more than makes up for.

    J.

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
    These sorts of things are the problem for me and why I'm perfectly content to spend more money on reliable lights of better design. I've been stuck in dark rural mosquito infested areas with a failed light. Believe me, at at time like that the marginal incremental cost of a good light seems pretty negligible. (It's also the reason to always have a backup light even with a good light.) The whole thing is just an unsavory and dangerous experience that the incremental money more than makes up for.

    J.
    I would alleviate dangerous and unsavory with a second light. Beyond that, define "incremental"
    Also can you speak personally to running your better light in 100+ degree heat for an hour or more on high..............
    CDT

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by CdaleTony View Post
    I would alleviate dangerous and unsavory with a second light. Beyond that, define "incremental"
    Also can you speak personally to running your better light in 100+ degree heat for an hour or more on high..............
    CDT
    I've run my Light & Motion lights in 100+ many many times here in Phoenix, on FULL, never an issue as described with the 872.
    ONE SHOX, ONE GEAR, LOTS of FUN! www.TrailFu.com My Rides

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by CdaleTony View Post
    I would alleviate dangerous and unsavory with a second light. Beyond that, define "incremental"
    Also can you speak personally to running your better light in 100+ degree heat for an hour or more on high..............
    CDT
    Don't have too - see post below. Perfect example.

    Mine was a failed battery.

    Incremental is the cost difference between what the cheap stuff costs and what the good stuff costs.

    When you're in the dark, miserable, no longer moving fast, and getting eaten alive by bugs, the incremental cost difference does not seem like a big deal anymore (at least to me). As well, riding home on an emergency light over rural highways where visibility to traffic is key, is not good with an emergency light and, maybe I'm wrong here, most of us are not going out with two complete sets of lights. Coming home over the 10 miles of unlit rural windy roads with a smaller light is not safe, IMO. The incremental cost will not even come close to the cost of an accident or injury.

    I, too, was more worried about the incremental cost until I got caught out. I ride with, and find I need, lots of light. Riding out with marginal light is still not my idea of equivalent safety or fun. So, I want max reliability. So, I buy the better stuff. YMMV - until you get caught out.

    I don't have to take the cheap route, so I don't.

    J.

  9. #59
    discombobulated SuperModerator
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
    Don't have too - see post below. Perfect example.

    Mine was a failed battery.

    Incremental is the cost difference between what the cheap stuff costs and what the good stuff costs.

    When you're in the dark, miserable, no longer moving fast, and getting eaten alive by bugs, the incremental cost difference does not seem like a big deal anymore (at least to me). As well, riding home on an emergency light over rural highways where visibility to traffic is key, is not good with an emergency light and, maybe I'm wrong here, most of us are not going out with two complete sets of lights. Coming home over the 10 miles of unlit rural windy roads with a smaller light is not safe, IMO. The incremental cost will not even come close to the cost of an accident or injury.

    I, too, was more worried about the incremental cost until I got caught out. I ride with, and find I need, lots of light. Riding out with marginal light is still not my idea of equivalent safety or fun. So, I want max reliability. So, I buy the better stuff. YMMV - until you get caught out.

    I don't have to take the cheap route, so I don't.

    J.
    That pretty much sums it up then. Incremental to me isnt double or triple the price. 10 or 15% is 'incremental' to me. I could afford a $400 light, but probably not 2. I prefer (in my northern climate) to run two $89 lights... Or heck even 2 $150 lights...
    CDT
    YMMV

  10. #60
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    Right. We have different ideas about incremental cost and the value it provides.

    I will say this - my definition of cheap - changed after I had this incident. There is false economy and buying marginally constructed marginally reliable lights is just false economy for me. If you think about the consequences of a failed light at a critical time see what a catastrophe it could be.

    BTW, I live in a northern climate too- Minnesota. Battery quality is a big issue here too for riding through the cold season. There are all sorts of issues with electronics in this application, heat is only one of them. There is cold, vibration, humidity, battery, etc... Given the time (and the desire), I could think of many.

    Look at the teardown pictures of this light above - all the short cuts are taken: THe machining/internal construction is a mess (i.e. look at the holes drilled in the aluminum plate), lack of thermal goo for heat transfer, lack of seal on case components and switch etc.. If I had the inclination it'd be fun to put this through a temp cycle/vibration test. I'm sure that would show a short predicted lifespan. If so, that begs the question of what happens when it fails? Are you just sitting at a stop sign or are you on a fast downhill on highly technical terrain when it all goes dark? That's a gamble I'm interested in making sure the odds are way in my favor - hence I'm willing to pay for reliability and quality.


    J.

  11. #61
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    I would rather go with the cheap light, problems waterproofing,overheating can be overcome with a bit of DIY, as far as reliability the most reliable option is in quantity i would put more trust in 2 cheaper lights rather than a single expensive one and when you can get something like 4 or more mj-872s and batteries for a single equlivant in a high end brand well bit of a no brainer to me.

  12. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by HellToupee View Post
    I would rather go with the cheap light, problems waterproofing,overheating can be overcome with a bit of DIY, as far as reliability the most reliable option is in quantity i would put more trust in 2 cheaper lights rather than a single expensive one and when you can get something like 4 or more mj-872s and batteries for a single equlivant in a high end brand well bit of a no brainer to me.
    It's not a choice between one high end and two low end. It's a choice between two lights either way. If you ride with a single light, you're in big trouble if that light goes out. In many cases you might be in BIG trouble very easily. My point was that you are still in a dangerous position getting home with one less bright light in many cases (visibility, traffic, road hazards etc...). But the real hazard - and this is where it really matters for reliability - is if your light fails at a dangerous time even if you have two lights on. For example, having one of my lights fail while descending at 30mph on a road would be a very big problem. On a trail, it's even worse. The quick change in brightness would be disorienting and a surprise.

    So, saying that happens - and I'm not saying it would, this is a game of statistics and probability over a statistically significant number of units - the potential for catastrophe is high even though the probability may be low. If that chance is twice as much (and it's probably a lot more than that), then that's a time when, after it occurs when I might be thinking that that incremental cost was not so much after all. That's also a risk I could have easily reduced but didn't, i.e. it was under my control to resolve.

    So, we all make our choices. Having been close to that situation and realizing how dangerous it can be, I'm not willing to take the risk. Just not worth it to me to save a few dollars.

    J.

  13. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by HellToupee View Post
    I would rather go with the cheap light, problems waterproofing,overheating can be overcome with a bit of DIY, as far as reliability the most reliable option is in quantity i would put more trust in 2 cheaper lights rather than a single expensive one and when you can get something like 4 or more mj-872s and batteries for a single equlivant in a high end brand well bit of a no brainer to me.
    It's a choice we all make, there is no universally correct decision. As with most things the higher quality options tend to cost more, we all have to decide if the extra expense is justified for our use. I think it is wrong when people preach that the high or low cost route is the best, it depends on several factors including budget.

    It's a no-brainier to me, I use my light 3 times a week most of the year and I value the design and features of the premium lights so that's what I buy some of the guys I ride with use Magicshine, and they just shrug if they have issues - to them it was worth the price of admission. I plan on using my new Lupine Piko and DiNotte 1200L-Plus for many years to come.
    ONE SHOX, ONE GEAR, LOTS of FUN! www.TrailFu.com My Rides

  14. #64
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    That's right. I'm the same way - my lights are used 3 or more times per week too. Every minute I can steal to ride my bike is important to me in the fall. I also can't afford to get hurt because I have no recuperation time before ski season starts and then it's 4-5 days a week on skis. Missing any time on either due to injury is a bigger problem than a couple of hundred dollars (i.e. I see it as a very low incremental cost).

    J.

  15. #65
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    You guys are getting off topic yes you are preaching no one gives a ***** how much you ride. Ive had plenty of big name lights fail on me.via either light head or battery...
    this thread is about MJ872 which neither of you seem to have any personal experience with.
    lets get this thread back on topic,,,,
    Ive been using this lighthead for about a month now with ZERO issues. yes 2 to 3 times a week. anytime you have a lighthead this small kicking out this many lumens its going to get hot DUH!!!!!!!!!!! you have to use it accordingly at 50% this is all most will need kick it up when you need it and its sickly bright
    Last edited by Rakuman; 09-18-2011 at 09:57 PM.
    I always type in bold cuz I'm blind as a bat
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  16. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
    ....So, saying that happens - and I'm not saying it would, this is a game of statistics and probability over a statistically significant number of units - the potential for catastrophe is high even though the probability may be low. If that chance is twice as much (and it's probably a lot more than that), then that's a time when, after it occurs when I might be thinking that that incremental cost was not so much after all. That's also a risk I could have easily reduced but didn't, i.e. it was under my control to resolve.

    So, we all make our choices. Having been close to that situation and realizing how dangerous it can be, I'm not willing to take the risk. Just not worth it to me to save a few dollars.

    J.
    Yes, we all make choices and we all make decisions based on issues important to us. When it comes to stuff like this there is no , "One shoe fits all". That being said there are different strategies to achieve similar goals as far as safety and reliability go. One approach is to take the high $$$ road with the idea being stuff that cost more but is more time tested and therefore more reliable. You'll get no argument from me along that line of thought. If you can afford it than it makes good sense. Then there's the approach of "safety in numbers". If one light fails you have back-ups. This is the approach I usually take although I have good reliable lights as well. I'm lucky because I own multiple light sets so I can mix and match.

    My usual set-up is thus: One main ( reliable/proven ) light on the bars accompanied by a proven multi-mode torch (XML ) on the other side. Then I use something on the helmet, either a torch or bike light depending on the need. Sometimes I will use three cheaper lights. I have no problem with this because all the stuff I have works and it would be most unusual for everything I have to fail but with that said I never ride at night without multiple lights regardless of what lights I use.

    Regardless of what lights you use all lights use batteries. If you forgot your battery or forgot to charge the battery..well...Crap happens. Like most people on forum here I have experienced what is like to suddenly be without lights. Worse case scenarios vary but I've had lights suddenly go out while on steep downhills..... ( Ah, those old Halogen days ... ) I also know the peril of being caught in the woods and suddenly realize that you have no lights and the sun is dropping fast. For me it's gotten to the point where if I think I'm going to do a late day run ( not unusual for me ) I'll at least carry a couple torches along and 2 extra cells. Both are XM-L mult-mode torches, have decent beam patterns and are very light weight. About 1300 lumen total for both - give or take 150lm.

    I took a solemn vowel years ago to never be caught without needing a light source while on my bike. So far I've kept that vowel ( with no help from Vanna.. ) and been fortunate enough to have never been without a needed light source ( or enough juice to run them ).......knock on wood.

    Just remember, regardless of what you own....Stuff happens.

  17. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
    It's not a choice between one high end and two low end. It's a choice between two lights either way. If you ride with a single light, you're in big trouble if that light goes out. For example, having one of my lights fail while descending at 30mph on a road would be a very big problem. On a trail, it's even worse. The quick change in brightness would be disorienting and a surprise.
    im picturing you careening down a mountain one handed trying to mount up a back-up light at full speed.

    this is where we use those funny looking levers on the handlebars that create friction on those shiny disc's bolted to the wheels. doing this properly you can actually slow your bicycle to a stop and allow you to assess your situation.

    after assessing the situation and realizing you no longer have the same amount of light, you can adjust your speed accordingly for the remainder of the trail with whatever backup light you have or do not have. once you get home you can trouble shoot your light and find out what you need to do to fix/replace whatever it is that failed. if you need to carry 14 lights on you at all times because you'll be damned if a light malfunction is going to ruin a single ride maybe its time to live life with a little moderation. go home, have a beer, look at what you need to fix or upgrade and not worry about not getting a "complete" ride in.
    Gary Fisher HiFi Deluxe 29er

  18. #68
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    You can't be serious. You mean that you are able, in pitch black at high speed with complete safety to bring your bike to rapid stop with no issues? If so, you are a better man than I.

    J.

  19. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Waltah View Post
    i
    this is where we use those funny looking levers on the handlebars that create friction on those shiny disc's bolted to the wheels. doing this properly you can actually slow your bicycle to a stop and allow you to assess your situation.

    after assessing the situation and realizing you no longer have the same amount of light, you can adjust your speed accordingly for the remainder of the trail with whatever backup light you have or do not have.
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
    You can't be serious. You mean that you are able, in pitch black at high speed with complete safety to bring your bike to rapid stop with no issues? If so, you are a better man than I.

    J.
    .....
    Gary Fisher HiFi Deluxe 29er

  20. #70
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    we wouldn't be in pitch black as we wouldnt be usingjust one fancy light which no matter how expensive is a single point of failure.

  21. #71
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    Congrats on the craptastic thread derailling, gentlemen

  22. #72
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    My take on it....two upfront (spot and flood) and two rear. Two batteries. Gives flexibility and backups. No problems with any light heads overheating. One rear did fail due to glass rotating with bezel and pulled internal wires away resulting in a short that may have damaged the battery. I replaced both and am more careful turning bezel (a weakness in design IMO).


  23. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by XJaredX View Post
    Congrats on the craptastic thread derailling, gentlemen



    Back to the original topic. I have ridden with the light on High on multiple rides now, all road, all when temps are <75 deg.... no drop in power on my end.

    I hooked up the light to the Dinotte 2-cell battery packs. On a full charge, the battery life indicator when running on a two cell goes from green, to blue, to orange, to red in a matter of about a minute. It must be pulling a ton of juice to drop the voltage like that on the two cell. If run on high for > 15 min, it starts to flash red (indicating < 15% battery life if I recall).

    I was just goffing off in the back yard with the light so did not run a full test on how long the 872 could run on a two cell battery.

    When road riding, I want minimum weight and bulk. I know I won't be any faster on the bike running a 2c vs a 4c battery, but I don't like that much crap strapped to my bars.

    I did get my 400L I loaned out to a friend back and will post pic's of the combo soon.... but the 400L gets lost in the blast of light the 872 puts out on high. Comparitvely, it makes the 400L look like a flashlight. Makes me want to upgrade the LED's in the 400L to the up the power to a true 400L (rather than the 250-300L others have stated this light head actually produces)

  24. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by hiroshima View Post
    I hooked up the light to the Dinotte 2-cell battery packs. On a full charge, the battery life indicator when running on a two cell goes from green, to blue, to orange, to red in a matter of about a minute. It must be pulling a ton of juice to drop the voltage like that on the two cell. If run on high for > 15 min, it starts to flash red (indicating < 15% battery life if I recall).

    I was just goffing off in the back yard with the light so did not run a full test on how long the 872 could run on a two cell battery.
    Do you know what the runtime is on the 4 cell battery it came with? (running on full / high mode)
    ONE SHOX, ONE GEAR, LOTS of FUN! www.TrailFu.com My Rides

  25. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by randyharris View Post
    Do you know what the runtime is on the 4 cell battery it came with? (running on full / high mode)
    4.5 battery
    Runtime: 1.75 hours on High (Level 4), 2.5 hours on Level 3, 3.5 hours on Level 2, 5.75 hours on Low (Level 1)
    6.0 battery
    Runtime: 2.4 hours on High (Level 4), 3.5 hours on Level 3, 5 hours on Level 2, 7.5 hours on Low (Level 1)
    these are off geomans site and I have tested them myself and get close to the same times.
    on the indicator going to red on high these lights give false battery indicator readings geoman states that clearly on his site
    A 5 stage power meter - as the battery depletes from 100% the backlit button will change colors from Green(100%) - Blue(95 - 70%) - Yellow(70 - 50%) - Red(50 - 5%) - Flashing Red(5 - 0%). ** Note results may vary as lightheads were designed after the battery, runtime estimates below are accurate however in the higher modes of output the indicator can provide incorrect readings.


    After it goes red on the 6.0 I get 1 hour + so i don't worry about what the indicator says
    I always type in bold cuz I'm blind as a bat
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