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  1. #51
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    Thank you very much for the review, OP.

    Does anyone know what I can expect regarding water resistance for the 872 with GMG battery? Was thinking of ordering one to pair with my Lupine Piko, want to make sure it can handle rain and such.

  2. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by nick d View Post
    i think that lighthead with an oring mount would be perfect
    I was told there is one in the works.

    I'm sure with a little work many mounts could be adapted to this light vs the handlebar mount they have now which is a bit tall.

    2013 Banshee Spitfire V2 650b

  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by skidad View Post
    I was told there is one in the works.

    I'm sure with a little work many mounts could be adapted to this light vs the handlebar mount they have now which is a bit tall.

    ]
    If you look at the picture you'll see that it is not mounted on "Actual" bike handlebars which makes it look taller because there's no stem. Still, the mount might be a little tall as you said compared to others. You could always adapt the light to other mounts which shouldn't be a problem. Niterider makes an off-set mount which should work very well although it is a bit expensive ($29 ). I have a Bikeray IV mounted on one and it rocks.

  4. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cat-man-do View Post
    If you look at the picture you'll see that it is not mounted on "Actual" bike handlebars which makes it look taller because there's no stem. Still, the mount might be a little tall as you said compared to others. You could always adapt the light to other mounts which shouldn't be a problem. Niterider makes an off-set mount which should work very well although it is a bit expensive ($29 ). I have a Bikeray IV mounted on one and it rocks.

    That style mount came with my MJ836 lights I have. They're not just a bit tall but also pretty flimsy and let the light bounce around a bit too much. I ended up buying a couple of these Planet Bike mounts:

    I had to swap the slide parts of the MS mounts onto the PB ones because they weren't an exact match. But the PB mount is much more secure.

    The Bikeray handlebar mounts that GeomanGear sells should work too.


  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by dobbs View Post
    I bought an 872 from Dealextreme and it has the new glass, but I can't really compare with the old glass. The light couldn't be better for what I need - I ride rocky technical trails and really need the flood beam.

    The problem is overheating. I live in Phoenix, and my summer night rides are often 100 degrees when I start at 8:30pm. On my last ride, I ran the light on next to lowest power (50% I think) and it had to shut down to the lowest power a few times to cool off. It was really quite annoying - even bombing down a hill it turned itself down.

    It looks like I can return it for DX for an exchange, but I'm wondering if it's just the design, and if it would be worthwhile for me to try to put some thermal paste on the inside of the heatsink ring. If so, how do you unscrew that lockring? Looks like it takes a special tool.

    Anyway, any advice you have would be helpful. Thanks.
    These sorts of things are the problem for me and why I'm perfectly content to spend more money on reliable lights of better design. I've been stuck in dark rural mosquito infested areas with a failed light. Believe me, at at time like that the marginal incremental cost of a good light seems pretty negligible. (It's also the reason to always have a backup light even with a good light.) The whole thing is just an unsavory and dangerous experience that the incremental money more than makes up for.

    J.

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
    These sorts of things are the problem for me and why I'm perfectly content to spend more money on reliable lights of better design. I've been stuck in dark rural mosquito infested areas with a failed light. Believe me, at at time like that the marginal incremental cost of a good light seems pretty negligible. (It's also the reason to always have a backup light even with a good light.) The whole thing is just an unsavory and dangerous experience that the incremental money more than makes up for.

    J.
    I would alleviate dangerous and unsavory with a second light. Beyond that, define "incremental"
    Also can you speak personally to running your better light in 100+ degree heat for an hour or more on high..............
    CDT

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by CdaleTony View Post
    I would alleviate dangerous and unsavory with a second light. Beyond that, define "incremental"
    Also can you speak personally to running your better light in 100+ degree heat for an hour or more on high..............
    CDT
    I've run my Light & Motion lights in 100+ many many times here in Phoenix, on FULL, never an issue as described with the 872.
    ONE SHOX, ONE GEAR, LOTS of FUN! www.TrailFu.com My Rides

  8. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by CdaleTony View Post
    I would alleviate dangerous and unsavory with a second light. Beyond that, define "incremental"
    Also can you speak personally to running your better light in 100+ degree heat for an hour or more on high..............
    CDT
    Don't have too - see post below. Perfect example.

    Mine was a failed battery.

    Incremental is the cost difference between what the cheap stuff costs and what the good stuff costs.

    When you're in the dark, miserable, no longer moving fast, and getting eaten alive by bugs, the incremental cost difference does not seem like a big deal anymore (at least to me). As well, riding home on an emergency light over rural highways where visibility to traffic is key, is not good with an emergency light and, maybe I'm wrong here, most of us are not going out with two complete sets of lights. Coming home over the 10 miles of unlit rural windy roads with a smaller light is not safe, IMO. The incremental cost will not even come close to the cost of an accident or injury.

    I, too, was more worried about the incremental cost until I got caught out. I ride with, and find I need, lots of light. Riding out with marginal light is still not my idea of equivalent safety or fun. So, I want max reliability. So, I buy the better stuff. YMMV - until you get caught out.

    I don't have to take the cheap route, so I don't.

    J.

  9. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
    Don't have too - see post below. Perfect example.

    Mine was a failed battery.

    Incremental is the cost difference between what the cheap stuff costs and what the good stuff costs.

    When you're in the dark, miserable, no longer moving fast, and getting eaten alive by bugs, the incremental cost difference does not seem like a big deal anymore (at least to me). As well, riding home on an emergency light over rural highways where visibility to traffic is key, is not good with an emergency light and, maybe I'm wrong here, most of us are not going out with two complete sets of lights. Coming home over the 10 miles of unlit rural windy roads with a smaller light is not safe, IMO. The incremental cost will not even come close to the cost of an accident or injury.

    I, too, was more worried about the incremental cost until I got caught out. I ride with, and find I need, lots of light. Riding out with marginal light is still not my idea of equivalent safety or fun. So, I want max reliability. So, I buy the better stuff. YMMV - until you get caught out.

    I don't have to take the cheap route, so I don't.

    J.
    That pretty much sums it up then. Incremental to me isnt double or triple the price. 10 or 15% is 'incremental' to me. I could afford a $400 light, but probably not 2. I prefer (in my northern climate) to run two $89 lights... Or heck even 2 $150 lights...
    CDT
    YMMV

  10. #60
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    Right. We have different ideas about incremental cost and the value it provides.

    I will say this - my definition of cheap - changed after I had this incident. There is false economy and buying marginally constructed marginally reliable lights is just false economy for me. If you think about the consequences of a failed light at a critical time see what a catastrophe it could be.

    BTW, I live in a northern climate too- Minnesota. Battery quality is a big issue here too for riding through the cold season. There are all sorts of issues with electronics in this application, heat is only one of them. There is cold, vibration, humidity, battery, etc... Given the time (and the desire), I could think of many.

    Look at the teardown pictures of this light above - all the short cuts are taken: THe machining/internal construction is a mess (i.e. look at the holes drilled in the aluminum plate), lack of thermal goo for heat transfer, lack of seal on case components and switch etc.. If I had the inclination it'd be fun to put this through a temp cycle/vibration test. I'm sure that would show a short predicted lifespan. If so, that begs the question of what happens when it fails? Are you just sitting at a stop sign or are you on a fast downhill on highly technical terrain when it all goes dark? That's a gamble I'm interested in making sure the odds are way in my favor - hence I'm willing to pay for reliability and quality.


    J.

  11. #61
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    I would rather go with the cheap light, problems waterproofing,overheating can be overcome with a bit of DIY, as far as reliability the most reliable option is in quantity i would put more trust in 2 cheaper lights rather than a single expensive one and when you can get something like 4 or more mj-872s and batteries for a single equlivant in a high end brand well bit of a no brainer to me.

  12. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by HellToupee View Post
    I would rather go with the cheap light, problems waterproofing,overheating can be overcome with a bit of DIY, as far as reliability the most reliable option is in quantity i would put more trust in 2 cheaper lights rather than a single expensive one and when you can get something like 4 or more mj-872s and batteries for a single equlivant in a high end brand well bit of a no brainer to me.
    It's not a choice between one high end and two low end. It's a choice between two lights either way. If you ride with a single light, you're in big trouble if that light goes out. In many cases you might be in BIG trouble very easily. My point was that you are still in a dangerous position getting home with one less bright light in many cases (visibility, traffic, road hazards etc...). But the real hazard - and this is where it really matters for reliability - is if your light fails at a dangerous time even if you have two lights on. For example, having one of my lights fail while descending at 30mph on a road would be a very big problem. On a trail, it's even worse. The quick change in brightness would be disorienting and a surprise.

    So, saying that happens - and I'm not saying it would, this is a game of statistics and probability over a statistically significant number of units - the potential for catastrophe is high even though the probability may be low. If that chance is twice as much (and it's probably a lot more than that), then that's a time when, after it occurs when I might be thinking that that incremental cost was not so much after all. That's also a risk I could have easily reduced but didn't, i.e. it was under my control to resolve.

    So, we all make our choices. Having been close to that situation and realizing how dangerous it can be, I'm not willing to take the risk. Just not worth it to me to save a few dollars.

    J.

  13. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by HellToupee View Post
    I would rather go with the cheap light, problems waterproofing,overheating can be overcome with a bit of DIY, as far as reliability the most reliable option is in quantity i would put more trust in 2 cheaper lights rather than a single expensive one and when you can get something like 4 or more mj-872s and batteries for a single equlivant in a high end brand well bit of a no brainer to me.
    It's a choice we all make, there is no universally correct decision. As with most things the higher quality options tend to cost more, we all have to decide if the extra expense is justified for our use. I think it is wrong when people preach that the high or low cost route is the best, it depends on several factors including budget.

    It's a no-brainier to me, I use my light 3 times a week most of the year and I value the design and features of the premium lights so that's what I buy some of the guys I ride with use Magicshine, and they just shrug if they have issues - to them it was worth the price of admission. I plan on using my new Lupine Piko and DiNotte 1200L-Plus for many years to come.
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  14. #64
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    That's right. I'm the same way - my lights are used 3 or more times per week too. Every minute I can steal to ride my bike is important to me in the fall. I also can't afford to get hurt because I have no recuperation time before ski season starts and then it's 4-5 days a week on skis. Missing any time on either due to injury is a bigger problem than a couple of hundred dollars (i.e. I see it as a very low incremental cost).

    J.

  15. #65
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    You guys are getting off topic yes you are preaching no one gives a ***** how much you ride. Ive had plenty of big name lights fail on me.via either light head or battery...
    this thread is about MJ872 which neither of you seem to have any personal experience with.
    lets get this thread back on topic,,,,
    Ive been using this lighthead for about a month now with ZERO issues. yes 2 to 3 times a week. anytime you have a lighthead this small kicking out this many lumens its going to get hot DUH!!!!!!!!!!! you have to use it accordingly at 50% this is all most will need kick it up when you need it and its sickly bright
    Last edited by Rakuman; 09-18-2011 at 08:57 PM.
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  16. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
    ....So, saying that happens - and I'm not saying it would, this is a game of statistics and probability over a statistically significant number of units - the potential for catastrophe is high even though the probability may be low. If that chance is twice as much (and it's probably a lot more than that), then that's a time when, after it occurs when I might be thinking that that incremental cost was not so much after all. That's also a risk I could have easily reduced but didn't, i.e. it was under my control to resolve.

    So, we all make our choices. Having been close to that situation and realizing how dangerous it can be, I'm not willing to take the risk. Just not worth it to me to save a few dollars.

    J.
    Yes, we all make choices and we all make decisions based on issues important to us. When it comes to stuff like this there is no , "One shoe fits all". That being said there are different strategies to achieve similar goals as far as safety and reliability go. One approach is to take the high $$$ road with the idea being stuff that cost more but is more time tested and therefore more reliable. You'll get no argument from me along that line of thought. If you can afford it than it makes good sense. Then there's the approach of "safety in numbers". If one light fails you have back-ups. This is the approach I usually take although I have good reliable lights as well. I'm lucky because I own multiple light sets so I can mix and match.

    My usual set-up is thus: One main ( reliable/proven ) light on the bars accompanied by a proven multi-mode torch (XML ) on the other side. Then I use something on the helmet, either a torch or bike light depending on the need. Sometimes I will use three cheaper lights. I have no problem with this because all the stuff I have works and it would be most unusual for everything I have to fail but with that said I never ride at night without multiple lights regardless of what lights I use.

    Regardless of what lights you use all lights use batteries. If you forgot your battery or forgot to charge the battery..well...Crap happens. Like most people on forum here I have experienced what is like to suddenly be without lights. Worse case scenarios vary but I've had lights suddenly go out while on steep downhills..... ( Ah, those old Halogen days ... ) I also know the peril of being caught in the woods and suddenly realize that you have no lights and the sun is dropping fast. For me it's gotten to the point where if I think I'm going to do a late day run ( not unusual for me ) I'll at least carry a couple torches along and 2 extra cells. Both are XM-L mult-mode torches, have decent beam patterns and are very light weight. About 1300 lumen total for both - give or take 150lm.

    I took a solemn vowel years ago to never be caught without needing a light source while on my bike. So far I've kept that vowel ( with no help from Vanna.. ) and been fortunate enough to have never been without a needed light source ( or enough juice to run them ).......knock on wood.

    Just remember, regardless of what you own....Stuff happens.

  17. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
    It's not a choice between one high end and two low end. It's a choice between two lights either way. If you ride with a single light, you're in big trouble if that light goes out. For example, having one of my lights fail while descending at 30mph on a road would be a very big problem. On a trail, it's even worse. The quick change in brightness would be disorienting and a surprise.
    im picturing you careening down a mountain one handed trying to mount up a back-up light at full speed.

    this is where we use those funny looking levers on the handlebars that create friction on those shiny disc's bolted to the wheels. doing this properly you can actually slow your bicycle to a stop and allow you to assess your situation.

    after assessing the situation and realizing you no longer have the same amount of light, you can adjust your speed accordingly for the remainder of the trail with whatever backup light you have or do not have. once you get home you can trouble shoot your light and find out what you need to do to fix/replace whatever it is that failed. if you need to carry 14 lights on you at all times because you'll be damned if a light malfunction is going to ruin a single ride maybe its time to live life with a little moderation. go home, have a beer, look at what you need to fix or upgrade and not worry about not getting a "complete" ride in.
    Gary Fisher HiFi Deluxe 29er

  18. #68
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    You can't be serious. You mean that you are able, in pitch black at high speed with complete safety to bring your bike to rapid stop with no issues? If so, you are a better man than I.

    J.

  19. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by Waltah View Post
    i
    this is where we use those funny looking levers on the handlebars that create friction on those shiny disc's bolted to the wheels. doing this properly you can actually slow your bicycle to a stop and allow you to assess your situation.

    after assessing the situation and realizing you no longer have the same amount of light, you can adjust your speed accordingly for the remainder of the trail with whatever backup light you have or do not have.
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
    You can't be serious. You mean that you are able, in pitch black at high speed with complete safety to bring your bike to rapid stop with no issues? If so, you are a better man than I.

    J.
    .....
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  20. #70
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    we wouldn't be in pitch black as we wouldnt be usingjust one fancy light which no matter how expensive is a single point of failure.

  21. #71
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    Congrats on the craptastic thread derailling, gentlemen

  22. #72
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    My take on it....two upfront (spot and flood) and two rear. Two batteries. Gives flexibility and backups. No problems with any light heads overheating. One rear did fail due to glass rotating with bezel and pulled internal wires away resulting in a short that may have damaged the battery. I replaced both and am more careful turning bezel (a weakness in design IMO).


  23. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by XJaredX View Post
    Congrats on the craptastic thread derailling, gentlemen



    Back to the original topic. I have ridden with the light on High on multiple rides now, all road, all when temps are <75 deg.... no drop in power on my end.

    I hooked up the light to the Dinotte 2-cell battery packs. On a full charge, the battery life indicator when running on a two cell goes from green, to blue, to orange, to red in a matter of about a minute. It must be pulling a ton of juice to drop the voltage like that on the two cell. If run on high for > 15 min, it starts to flash red (indicating < 15% battery life if I recall).

    I was just goffing off in the back yard with the light so did not run a full test on how long the 872 could run on a two cell battery.

    When road riding, I want minimum weight and bulk. I know I won't be any faster on the bike running a 2c vs a 4c battery, but I don't like that much crap strapped to my bars.

    I did get my 400L I loaned out to a friend back and will post pic's of the combo soon.... but the 400L gets lost in the blast of light the 872 puts out on high. Comparitvely, it makes the 400L look like a flashlight. Makes me want to upgrade the LED's in the 400L to the up the power to a true 400L (rather than the 250-300L others have stated this light head actually produces)

  24. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by hiroshima View Post
    I hooked up the light to the Dinotte 2-cell battery packs. On a full charge, the battery life indicator when running on a two cell goes from green, to blue, to orange, to red in a matter of about a minute. It must be pulling a ton of juice to drop the voltage like that on the two cell. If run on high for > 15 min, it starts to flash red (indicating < 15% battery life if I recall).

    I was just goffing off in the back yard with the light so did not run a full test on how long the 872 could run on a two cell battery.
    Do you know what the runtime is on the 4 cell battery it came with? (running on full / high mode)
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  25. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by randyharris View Post
    Do you know what the runtime is on the 4 cell battery it came with? (running on full / high mode)
    4.5 battery
    Runtime: 1.75 hours on High (Level 4), 2.5 hours on Level 3, 3.5 hours on Level 2, 5.75 hours on Low (Level 1)
    6.0 battery
    Runtime: 2.4 hours on High (Level 4), 3.5 hours on Level 3, 5 hours on Level 2, 7.5 hours on Low (Level 1)
    these are off geomans site and I have tested them myself and get close to the same times.
    on the indicator going to red on high these lights give false battery indicator readings geoman states that clearly on his site
    A 5 stage power meter - as the battery depletes from 100% the backlit button will change colors from Green(100%) - Blue(95 - 70%) - Yellow(70 - 50%) - Red(50 - 5%) - Flashing Red(5 - 0%). ** Note results may vary as lightheads were designed after the battery, runtime estimates below are accurate however in the higher modes of output the indicator can provide incorrect readings.


    After it goes red on the 6.0 I get 1 hour + so i don't worry about what the indicator says
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  26. #76
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    From another forum

    For those of you who have gotten the replacement batteries - The LED indicator might turn RED sooner than expected even though you have a fully charged pack.

    Here is the official explanation from Geomangear:

    "We understand you are seeing some variations in the color indicator. We have referred this issue to our battery manufacturer and they have examined the discharge rates of the Panasonic cells we use and the other cells that Magicshine has used in a number of battery packs. The cells from different manufacturers discharge at different rates and the voltage meter in the lighthead was designed to compliment the chinese cells rather than the Panasonic cells we use. The burntime will be the same as listed however the color indicators will change faster with the Panasonic cells. We have posted color change estimates on our website that you might see with the GeoManGear battery packs.

    Our battery pack manufacturer is looking at solutions to this issue however we will only use the Panasonic cells and we don't manufacture the lightheads so it will be a difficult issue to overcome.

    We are not seeing any diminished runtime, only lighthead indicator colors are showing change earlier than the original Chinese battery packs as discussed above.

    Thanks
    GeoManGear"



    ***

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    In regards to weatherproofing. Clear GE silicone caulk is good up to at least 400F, so that should make for a bombproof seal.

    In regards to heating problems. There is a very thermally conductive "caulk" that is used to conduct heat from electronic devices, like power amps, to their heat sinks. Using this and some aluminum tubing one should be able to wrap 12-20 4-8" tubes around the 872 and dramatically increase the size of the heat sink. Drilling holes along the sides of the tubes will make them even more effective, as will larger diameters.

    Old TV antenna rods should work well. Another ready source of quality aluminum is knitting needles. They come in many sizes and lengths, and even in double pointed versions. Again, drilling holes along the length of the tubes will help them dump heat.

    Some kind of funnel shaped air scoop might also help, as would a spray bottle attachment stuck into a hydration pack's mouth tube. Think water-cooled machine guns.

  28. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreyBard View Post
    In regards to weatherproofing. Clear GE silicone caulk is good up to at least 400F, so that should make for a bombproof seal.

    In regards to heating problems. There is a very thermally conductive "caulk" that is used to conduct heat from electronic devices, like power amps, to their heat sinks. Using this and some aluminum tubing one should be able to wrap 12-20 4-8" tubes around the 872 and dramatically increase the size of the heat sink. Drilling holes along the sides of the tubes will make them even more effective, as will larger diameters.

    Old TV antenna rods should work well. Another ready source of quality aluminum is knitting needles. They come in many sizes and lengths, and even in double pointed versions. Again, drilling holes along the length of the tubes will help them dump heat.

    Some kind of funnel shaped air scoop might also help, as would a spray bottle attachment stuck into a hydration pack's mouth tube. Think water-cooled machine guns.
    Huh, are you kidding me. Why should you have to do all that to a new light beside making the thing look hideous. You can buy the MJ-856 which has the exact same specs and beam pattern as the MJ-872 in a package that should cool much better. It's 4.6mm larger in diameter and for some maybe not as attractive as the 872 but that's the one I've ordered because clearly the 872 has some overheating issues.

    2013 Banshee Spitfire V2 650b

  29. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by skidad View Post
    Huh, are you kidding me. Why should you have to do all that to a new light beside making the thing look hideous. You can buy the MJ-856 which has the exact same specs and beam pattern as the MJ-872 in a package that should cool much better. It's 4.6mm larger in diameter and for some maybe not as attractive as the 872 but that's the one I've ordered because clearly the 872 has some overheating issues.
    One guy who has rides in 100 degree temps and has overheating issues does not mean the general user will. Ive used it in 90 with zero issues. I like this light so much I'm planning on getting another
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    Quote Originally Posted by skidad View Post
    Huh, are you kidding me. Why should you have to do all that to a new light beside making the thing look hideous. You can buy the MJ-856 which has the exact same specs and beam pattern as the MJ-872 in a package that should cool much better. It's 4.6mm larger in diameter and for some maybe not as attractive as the 872 but that's the one I've ordered because clearly the 872 has some overheating issues.
    I agree, I am not sure I want to slap green, yelllow, and pink knitting needles onto the sides of my light with caulking.... then drill them out....

    Night riding in CA, unless doing so in Death Valley, usually gets no hotter than 85.... and if its that hot (I am a woose) I wouldn't go....

    Overheating issues should be taken with an eye to your own local weather. I am Northern CA, Most nights, even when its 100 degs in the day.... drops to the 70's at night. Also consider road vs MTB where road speeds will help carry off heat from the light more efficiently.

    The light has not been around long enough for any true measure of reliability. My opinion is that the light may indeed get really hot internally. So much so that it will drastically shorten the life of the LED/driver/etc....

    *BUT*, in the last 7 years, I have purchased 5 different sets of lights.... all increasing light output with each iteration. I may not be the norm.... but I am willing to wager I will replace/upgrade the light long before it wears out on its own.

  31. #81
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    Man, you guys can really get testy about these things. I've done many rides with my MJ-872 over the last couple months since I bought it and worked on my overheating issues - and I love it. I usually go out with a MJ-808 strapped to the bar as well, but I never use it. I like the broad flood and smooth transition from the 872 even better than the two of them mixed together. Bright spots hurt technical riding ability IMO.

    If I were to buy another, and I may (my wife rides, too) I would get the MJ-856, or buy the MJ-872 from GeomanGear for the additional US support. I still think there is a possibility I have a bad unit, but it is working fine for my purposes.

    So, other than my 872 and 808, my other experiences with lights have been NiteRider. I got a set of two halogen lights back in 95 or so that were good at the time, and quite reliable. Then in the mid 2000s I bought a NR Blowtorch HID light. Heavy, and unreliable with a terrible flicker at speed. I've had two bulbs go out on me mid-ride. I would much rather spend the money on two Magicshines, than bet my ride on one expensive unit. Redundancy is good.

  32. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by dobbs View Post
    Man, you guys can really get testy about these things. I've done many rides with my MJ-872 over the last couple months since I bought it and worked on my overheating issues - and I love it. I usually go out with a MJ-808 strapped to the bar as well, but I never use it. I like the broad flood and smooth transition from the 872 even better than the two of them mixed together. Bright spots hurt technical riding ability IMO.

    If I were to buy another, and I may (my wife rides, too) I would get the MJ-856, or buy the MJ-872 from GeomanGear for the additional US support. I still think there is a possibility I have a bad unit, but it is working fine for my purposes.

    So, other than my 872 and 808, my other experiences with lights have been NiteRider. I got a set of two halogen lights back in 95 or so that were good at the time, and quite reliable. Then in the mid 2000s I bought a NR Blowtorch HID light. Heavy, and unreliable with a terrible flicker at speed. I've had two bulbs go out on me mid-ride. I would much rather spend the money on two Magicshines, than bet my ride on one expensive unit. Redundancy is good.
    Dont take may bold type as testy Im just blind and like to be able to see what Ive typed
    It does not matter which light you buy I just like to point out the facts.. that one guys issue isn't everyone's
    I always type in bold cuz I'm blind as a bat
    For the Rich there is therapy!!!! for the rest of us we have Mountain Biking


  33. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnJ80 View Post
    These sorts of things are the problem for me and why I'm perfectly content to spend more money on reliable lights of better design. I've been stuck in dark rural mosquito infested areas with a failed light. Believe me, at at time like that the marginal incremental cost of a good light seems pretty negligible. (It's also the reason to always have a backup light even with a good light.) The whole thing is just an unsavory and dangerous experience that the incremental money more than makes up for.

    J.
    I'm convinced that JohnJ80 feels the need to get involved with all the Magicshine/budget light threads to justify to himself for spending so much on his lights.

    Personally, if there was a product that I wasn't interested in for myself, I'd have very little to say about it, and certainly wouldn't spend countless time talking about it.

    But hey, I'm weird like that

  34. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by fightnut View Post
    I'm convinced that JohnJ80 feels the need to get involved with all the Magicshine/budget light threads to justify to himself for spending so much on his lights.

    Personally, if there was a product that I wasn't interested in for myself, I'd have very little to say about it, and certainly wouldn't spend countless time talking about it.

    But hey, I'm weird like that
    Seriously, what are the odds of both MagicShine lights failing on the same ride? Pretty damn low, I would think. Odds of my MJ-872 overheating on a 105 degree nightride - pretty high. But the solution is easy. Turn it off when you are not moving; don't run the light higher than 50% on a slow climb. Even when it has overheated, it's still usable, it just runs at a lower intensity.

  35. #85
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    Followup on my impressions of the light. Ran the road bike last night with 872 and MS900 on the bars + Dinotte 400L on the lid. Road ride, 20.2 ave with more than a few stops at red lights and a late night drop-off at the library. Did it at 11pm at night.

    Had all lights on high. Cars SLOWED down for me as I approached.... some slowed down and looked when going in the same direction... it was creepy since it was so late. All I think were just curious, and not malicious.

    Pushing close to 2000 lumnes out the front with a significant (probably 40%) going into the atmosphere. Approaching parked trailers I had a GREAT view of all their reflective tape so I know I had a lot of light above the horrizon. I pointed both bar lights down to hit about 25' in front of me. 50' seemed too far off and decreased intensity.

    The P7 alone used to be nice, but now that I have the 872 with a wide, smooth, and even swath of light,.... I am no longer happy with the P7 (or even a dual P7 setup). The bright center spot just draws the eye into too small of an area to really have a good scan of the ground. The 872 is awsome in that respect. Aimed ~25' in front of me, I have a solid and pretty even bar of light from my front wheel out beyond the center focus area of the light. The P7 can't hope to have such great coverage.

    The down-side is that this think probably dazzles other drivers.... hate to think what it would do to a unsuspecting cyclist going the wrong way in the bike lane (as often happens where I live). I would guess they would be blinded for a bit not making it safe for them or me.

    The 400L on the lid is nice, but with 2000 lumens, my guess is that my pupils we "stopping down" the light my eyes were seeing since it so damn bright. The 400L just can't keep up. Its usefull, but just marginally. Taking turns at speed, where my head is spotting my exit line, I can feel my eyes strain to try to adjust to he sudden drop in light. (going from 2000 to 250 lumens is a big drop).

    I rode on the levee where there are basically no lights... these lights rock. I can travel as fast as I want and do not fear not having enought reaction time to stop. Topped 33mph on the ride, no issues.

    I kinda wish it had more throw, but REALLY like the spread. I think the next step, if there is one, is to run two lights, one 872 and one spot with a pencil beam to blaze a path down the road.

  36. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by hiroshima View Post
    Followup on my impressions of the light. Ran the road bike last night with 872 and MS900 on the bars + Dinotte 400L on the lid. Road ride, 20.2 ave with more than a few stops at red lights and a late night drop-off at the library. Did it at 11pm at night.

    Had all lights on high. Cars SLOWED down for me as I approached.... some slowed down and looked when going in the same direction... it was creepy since it was so late. All I think were just curious, and not malicious.

    Pushing close to 2000 lumnes out the front with a significant (probably 40%) going into the atmosphere. Approaching parked trailers I had a GREAT view of all their reflective tape so I know I had a lot of light above the horrizon. I pointed both bar lights down to hit about 25' in front of me. 50' seemed too far off and decreased intensity.

    The P7 alone used to be nice, but now that I have the 872 with a wide, smooth, and even swath of light,.... I am no longer happy with the P7 (or even a dual P7 setup). The bright center spot just draws the eye into too small of an area to really have a good scan of the ground. The 872 is awsome in that respect. Aimed ~25' in front of me, I have a solid and pretty even bar of light from my front wheel out beyond the center focus area of the light. The P7 can't hope to have such great coverage.

    The down-side is that this think probably dazzles other drivers.... hate to think what it would do to a unsuspecting cyclist going the wrong way in the bike lane (as often happens where I live). I would guess they would be blinded for a bit not making it safe for them or me.

    The 400L on the lid is nice, but with 2000 lumens, my guess is that my pupils we "stopping down" the light my eyes were seeing since it so damn bright. The 400L just can't keep up. Its usefull, but just marginally. Taking turns at speed, where my head is spotting my exit line, I can feel my eyes strain to try to adjust to he sudden drop in light. (going from 2000 to 250 lumens is a big drop).

    I rode on the levee where there are basically no lights... these lights rock. I can travel as fast as I want and do not fear not having enought reaction time to stop. Topped 33mph on the ride, no issues.

    I kinda wish it had more throw, but REALLY like the spread. I think the next step, if there is one, is to run two lights, one 872 and one spot with a pencil beam to blaze a path down the road.
    Pair it with a XM-L next to it like lesoudeur and Me its unbelievably bright you don't miss much with that XM-L lighting everything within 100 yards and the 872 picking up everything close. I find myself going faster than I do in the day cuz the ruts don't look as deep
    I always type in bold cuz I'm blind as a bat
    For the Rich there is therapy!!!! for the rest of us we have Mountain Biking


  37. #87
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    LED surround blemish

    Ok, I just got my new MJ-856 (872 in different housing) and noticed maybe a little problem. Would like to get some experienced opinions as this is my first light.

    In the shiny area that surrounds 2 of the LED's there are small chips or blemishes. 1 on each of the LED surrounds. Not to big on either but looks like something that would happen if you tightened down to much on plastic and it chipped a little. Actually now that I look really close only 1 of the shiny area surrounds of the 4 LED's is really perfect without a blemish of some sort.

    I presume I should return this if it's gonna affect the light?

    Very speedy shipping from BrightStone in NC BTW and a brand new MS 5.6Ah battery with Samsung cells is now available. GeoMan doesn't plan to stock the MJ-856 version light.

    Thanks all
    Last edited by skidad; 09-22-2011 at 05:08 PM.
    2013 Banshee Spitfire V2 650b

  38. #88
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    New vs Old optic on the mj-872 Hi

    I got 2 MJ-872 with the "old" flod beam optic, have anyone compared the new optic with the old one. im close to order one to get mor pencilbeam on one of the lights.

    But have anyone seen both optics to compare the difference ?

    Regards

  39. #89
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    What about MJ-870?

    Hi,
    Anybody who has any impressions and experience with MJ-870? Every of you bought MJ-872 so I am the only person who ordered an MJ-870? (Ordered 3 weeks ago from DX, I will get it soon, I guess. I will give you some info if anyone is interested in. Anyway, I also have an updated MJ-808, not the Cree led one but the older P7 led version. Thus, I can do some comparison between those lights.)

  40. #90
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    Quote Originally Posted by pena40 View Post
    New vs Old optic on the mj-872 Hi

    I got 2 MJ-872 with the "old" flod beam optic, have anyone compared the new optic with the old one. im close to order one to get mor pencilbeam on one of the lights.

    But have anyone seen both optics to compare the difference ?

    Regards
    There are lots of posts around with beamshots of the 872 but I have not seen a side by side between the old and new optic. Obviously the shots from the very beginning of this thread are the old optic and most likely more floody than the new one. Even so the beam on the new one is a 25 degree so pretty wide. Not sure how long the older optic version was in production but they must have changed it for a reason. Maybe you could get an exchange for the new optic light heads? GeoMan could probably answer this question best. Shoot him a PM or email.
    2013 Banshee Spitfire V2 650b

  41. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by pena40 View Post
    New vs Old optic on the mj-872 Hi

    I got 2 MJ-872 with the "old" flod beam optic, have anyone compared the new optic with the old one. im close to order one to get mor pencilbeam on one of the lights.

    But have anyone seen both optics to compare the difference ?

    Regards
    This light, with the new optic will never be a pencil beam. I have not had both versions, but I do have the current version (with the clear optic) and this is a flood light through-and-through. If you need a pencil beam, look to another light-head entirely. Geoman has spare clear lenses they were giving away a month or so back for those who had the old version. eMail them and they may still have some left.

  42. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by pena40 View Post
    New vs Old optic on the mj-872 Hi

    I got 2 MJ-872 with the "old" flod beam optic, have anyone compared the new optic with the old one. im close to order one to get mor pencilbeam on one of the lights.

    But have anyone seen both optics to compare the difference ?

    Regards
    Just recieved the new optic and i can say the new optic is much better in every way.

    Lux of the P7 37
    Lux of the XML 44
    Lux of the old optic 65
    Lux with new optic 85

    The beam pattern is much more uniform too, the old light is just a splurge of light, the new one has a defined flood, although the edges do have definition they fade out nicely.

    I did notice when changing the optic, the star had come off the body, if this is the case on lots of these lights, this may be a cause of everyones overheating issues.

    I find only low mode stays proper cool while riding, the other modes do get warm even when moving

  43. #93
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    Finally, I received my MJ-870. At this moment, I don't have any experience with it on the mountain trails, but I'm wondering about that the lamp is still equipped with the old lens and not with the new clear one... So I will try to find the way how to get the updated lens. Nevertheless, the build quality is much better than my old MJ-808's and in spite of that this model has 'only' 3 Cree XP-Gs, the light output is apparently much bigger than at my MJ-808. Can't wait to try it on the trails...

  44. #94
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    How to cool

    Quote Originally Posted by hiroshima View Post
    I agree, I am not sure I want to slap green, yelllow, and pink knitting needles onto the sides of my light with caulking.... then drill them out....

    Night riding in CA, unless doing so in Death Valley, usually gets no hotter than 85.... and if its that hot (I am a woose) I wouldn't go....

    Overheating issues should be taken with an eye to your own local weather. I am Northern CA, Most nights, even when its 100 degs in the day.... drops to the 70's at night. Also consider road vs MTB where road speeds will help carry off heat from the light more efficiently.

    The light has not been around long enough for any true measure of reliability. My opinion is that the light may indeed get really hot internally. So much so that it will drastically shorten the life of the LED/driver/etc....

    *BUT*, in the last 7 years, I have purchased 5 different sets of lights.... all increasing light output with each iteration. I may not be the norm.... but I am willing to wager I will replace/upgrade the light long before it wears out on its own.
    Interesting choice of colors there. Knitting needles come in all kinds of colors, so you'd pick one that's palatable.

    @hiroshima, A question was asked on the 1st page about cooling, and no response was given - other than the implied one of "dig a hole and bury the light you just paid good money for, and buy a new one". If you don't have a cooling issue, why comment? Clearly my post was not directed at you.

    Your response implies you have faith that the newly designed case will solve the problem. I doubt that is going to be true, because I've spent a lot of time studying how electronic devices are heat-sinked, and that case design is NOT very effective. It might look pretty, but it won't sink heat well. Most people will think it works super-awesome, because they didn't have a heat problem in the 1st place, just a lot of loose change burning a hole in their pockets.

    If your shiny new toy doesn't stay cool enough either, get back to me, I'm actually knowledgeable in this area and have some constructive ideas to offer. Even if they aren't pretty enough to put a sparkle in your eyes, they won't leave you stranded high on a mtn somewhere.

  45. #95
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    Redundancy is better

    Quote Originally Posted by dobbs View Post
    Man, you guys can really get testy about these things. I've done many rides with my MJ-872 over the last couple months since I bought it and worked on my overheating issues - and I love it. I usually go out with a MJ-808 strapped to the bar as well, but I never use it. I like the broad flood and smooth transition from the 872 even better than the two of them mixed together. Bright spots hurt technical riding ability IMO.

    If I were to buy another, and I may (my wife rides, too) I would get the MJ-856, or buy the MJ-872 from GeomanGear for the additional US support. I still think there is a possibility I have a bad unit, but it is working fine for my purposes.

    So, other than my 872 and 808, my other experiences with lights have been NiteRider. I got a set of two halogen lights back in 95 or so that were good at the time, and quite reliable. Then in the mid 2000s I bought a NR Blowtorch HID light. Heavy, and unreliable with a terrible flicker at speed. I've had two bulbs go out on me mid-ride. I would much rather spend the money on two Magicshines, than bet my ride on one expensive unit. Redundancy is good.
    I was going to make the same point. You can have completely redundant power and lamps and still more redundancy for taillights and last-ditch PB Blaze 2W up front.

    The chances that you'd be in the middle of a treacherous descent and have all of that fail at once are infinitesimal, and much less than the failure of any single device no matter how much it costs.

    If all of that fails at once, just relax and enjoy being whisked into another Galaxy by aliens who found you interesting, and decided to take you for a pet.

  46. #96
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    Mine just arrived! First ride tonight.




  47. #97
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    pulled the trigger for a 2600 lumens combo: 808E XML $ 872.

    Just cant wait to test them.

  48. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by skidad View Post
    Ok, I just got my new MJ-856 (872 in different housing) and noticed maybe a little problem. Would like to get some experienced opinions as this is my first light.

    In the shiny area that surrounds 2 of the LED's there are small chips or blemishes. 1 on each of the LED surrounds. Not to big on either but looks like something that would happen if you tightened down to much on plastic and it chipped a little. Actually now that I look really close only 1 of the shiny area surrounds of the 4 LED's is really perfect without a blemish of some sort.

    I presume I should return this if it's gonna affect the light?

    Very speedy shipping from BrightStone in NC BTW and a brand new MS 5.6Ah battery with Samsung cells is now available. GeoMan doesn't plan to stock the MJ-856 version light.

    Thanks all
    Well I got no answers to my question but I did end up returning the lamp head only to BrightStone Sports in NC and they returned to me a perfect MJ-856 lamp head ASAP. They have been great all through the order process with all my questions and were very apologetic about the 1st lamp head. They also gave me their advertised 5% discount when you spend $200 or more even when my order didn't hit the $200 mark. Nice...every bit helps.

    Link...BrightStoneSports - MagicShine Bike Light and Accessories | Magic Shine MJ-808 | MJ-808e | MJ-816 | MJ-818 | MJ-856 | MJ-872 | ...
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  49. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by GreyBard View Post
    If all of that fails at once, just relax and enjoy being whisked into another Galaxy by aliens who found you interesting, and decided to take you for a pet.

  50. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by skidad View Post
    I was told there is one in the works.

    I'm sure with a little work many mounts could be adapted to this light vs the handlebar mount they have now which is a bit tall.

    Ask and you shall receive....O-ring mount version now available of the MJ-856. The mount pictured above which I got is actually pretty nice and a bit better IMO with a few easy mods.

    MagicShine MJ-856b O-ring mount 1600 lumens LED Bike Light Set

    2013 Banshee Spitfire V2 650b

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