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  1. #1
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    Lights and DAYTIME riding

    On my motorcycle back in the day, I would keep high beams on during daylight, then regular (low beam) at night. This was the safety rule of thumb among street motorcycle riders.

    So now I'm thinking, why not install and keep headlights and tail lights on my new mountain bike during daylight? Some of the trails I ride include paved sections and hikers as well as horses.

    Good idea?

    Anybody else doing this?

    Any possible problems?

    By the way, I've never owned a bicycle light before. I've always ridden dirt trails ONLY during daylight and plan on doing same. I don't enjoy night rides in the trails.

  2. #2
    Give it a crank
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    As long as you have juice left to keep going in the dark after sunset, you should be ok.

    It's up to each rider, but at normal bikes speeds, there's no real need for a daytime light.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by solidass View Post
    On my motorcycle back in the day, I would keep high beams on during daylight, then regular (low beam) at night. This was the safety rule of thumb among street motorcycle riders.

    So now I'm thinking, why not install and keep headlights and tail lights on my new mountain bike during daylight? Some of the trails I ride include paved sections and hikers as well as horses.

    Good idea?

    Anybody else doing this?

    Any possible problems?

    By the way, I've never owned a bicycle light before. I've always ridden dirt trails ONLY during daylight and plan on doing same. I don't enjoy night rides in the trails.
    I use my lights in the daytime for safety, yes. Do they work, I think definitely yes. In urban or high-turnover parking areas, I'll switch to a strobing/pulsing headlight mode to catch the peripheral vision of jaywalking pedestrians, and people about to throw their car door open into my path. I often use my helmet light in those areas too, since it shows over the top of parked cars for people (pedestrians or drivers) about to cross my path.

    Taillights, similar story. Getting on the radar early is useful, especially in this day of cellphone/GPS zombies.

    That's all from the arterial-warrior perspective. On the trails, it's your responsibility to ride with enough of a safety buffer that you can yield to the hikers and equestrians, not to try to make yourself visible so they can yield to you. If you routinely have close calls with other riders going the opposite direction, then sure, run your lights.

    Any possible problems?
    Running your battery down and getting stranded, or parking your bike and forgetting that your light is on, are the ones coming to mind.

  4. #4
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    On my city commuter, I started running my lights all the time after I put on a dynamo front wheel. I figure anything to maximize visibility on city streets can't be bad. Just the other day, stopped at a light, a motorist had to tell me how bright my taillight was and where could he get one? This was in broad daylight (and music to my ears). That said, I'm not sure it would be as beneficial (or appreciated) on multi-use trails.

  5. #5
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    A yellow light on the front in daylight works.
    red flashing light in back works.
    rechargable batteries work.

    1 watt is better. 1/2 watt minium.

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