Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 60
  1. #26
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    988
    Quote Originally Posted by aBicycle View Post
    How would an Edelux or one of those supernova lights compare to the typical 1000 lumen headlight?
    I have the economy cousin of the Edelux, namely the Cyo 60-lux, and I have had a variety of high-output battery lights like my DiNotte 1200+ dual-quad. In a nutshell, the Edelux or Cyo 60 are are great for riding on a dark highway, but not good for riding off-road. They have a relatively long, narrow beam and they put a lot of their light way down the highway so you have time to react to, say, lumber that fell off a truck. The beam has a pretty strict horizontal cutoff, so you get only trivial amounts of "be-seen" light above the horizon. Nice for oncoming traffic, particularly pedestrians or cyclists.

    The flood beam of the DiNotte 1200+, is great for mountain biking because it'll light up stuff well above the horizon, like tree branches or the opposite side of a G-out you're diving into. The "spray light everywhere" beam pattern is also good for showing up in nasty city traffic. But on a highway, it tends to overilluminate the area right in front of the bike. Your eyes adapt to that bright zone at a uselessly-close range, and you have difficulty seeing that piece of lumber 4 seconds out. Sometimes less is more, if it's in the right place.

    In my case, I also have had frustrations with battery lights in cold-weather training. Oh yay, I've been out for 30 minutes and my light's signaling LOW BATTERY Not a problem with dynamo. The endless endurance is sometimes handy too... I completed a one-month 1500-mile Strava challenge on dynamo power, doing up to 70-80 miles per night on a state highway. Or in one case, 100 miles: Bike Ride Profile | Slow nighttime 100-miler to Steptoe & back near Spokane | Times and Records | Strava

    Since you mentioned Supernova, I can also remark that I had one and wasn't impressed with it. If you want a highway-riding light, get the Cyo 60-lux or Luxos B, or wait for the Cyo Premium or Edelux II. If you want an off-road dynamo light, maybe one of Kerry's Klites. I think I'm going to get the 1000lm version for my XC bike, I've already got a suitable dynamo wheel.

  2. #27
    mtbr member
    Reputation: androgen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    874
    Quote Originally Posted by mechBgon View Post
    The flood beam of the DiNotte 1200+, is great for mountain biking because it'll light up stuff well above the horizon, like tree branches or the opposite side of a G-out you're diving into. The "spray light everywhere" beam pattern is also good for showing up in nasty city traffic. But on a highway, it tends to overilluminate the area right in front of the bike. Your eyes adapt to that bright zone at a uselessly-close range, and you have difficulty seeing that piece of lumber 4 seconds out. Sometimes less is more, if it's in the right place.
    well i have a "spray light everywhere" Light & Motion Seca on the helmet and i actually had to add a second light on the bar just to fill in the the light at close range because of how throwy the Helmet Mounted Seca is.

    if you mount a bad light on the bar you will have the problem you described. IMO dinotte does not and never has made a good headlight ( just like they have never made a bad tail light ).

    by raising your dinotte to the helmet height you would have immediately cut down the nearfield illumination by a factor of 2X to 3X without sacrificing the throw.

    i would describe the beam pattern of Dinotte, Lupine and other low quality head lights as cylindrical. i would describe beam pattern of Light & Motion, Niterider and other good lights ( there aren't any other good lights though ) as conical. a proper "conical" ( in my terminology ) beam pattern when angled down slightly from horizonatal will produce exactly even lighting from the front tire to the point where it is aimed. a "cylindrical" beam pattern will project a bright and ugly ring of light a few feet in front of the bike and darkness everywhere else.

    don't be hating on powerful lights. try a Seca.

    here is what i mean by conical vs cylindrical ( they're not good terms, i just made them up ) :

    the red line in top graph is a conical beam. the bottom graph is a cylindrical beam.





    the "cylindrical" beam usually results from optics and is appropriate for tail lights. "conical" beam usually results from reflectors and is appropriate for headlights.

  3. #28
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    897
    Quote Originally Posted by mechBgon View Post
    I have the economy cousin of the Edelux, namely the Cyo 60-lux, and I have had a variety of high-output battery lights like my DiNotte 1200+ dual-quad. In a nutshell, the Edelux or Cyo 60 are are great for riding on a dark highway, but not good for riding off-road. They have a relatively long, narrow beam and they put a lot of their light way down the highway so you have time to react to, say, lumber that fell off a truck. The beam has a pretty strict horizontal cutoff, so you get only trivial amounts of "be-seen" light above the horizon. Nice for oncoming traffic, particularly pedestrians or cyclists.

    The flood beam of the DiNotte 1200+, is great for mountain biking because it'll light up stuff well above the horizon, like tree branches or the opposite side of a G-out you're diving into. The "spray light everywhere" beam pattern is also good for showing up in nasty city traffic. But on a highway, it tends to overilluminate the area right in front of the bike. Your eyes adapt to that bright zone at a uselessly-close range, and you have difficulty seeing that piece of lumber 4 seconds out. Sometimes less is more, if it's in the right place.

    In my case, I also have had frustrations with battery lights in cold-weather training. Oh yay, I've been out for 30 minutes and my light's signaling LOW BATTERY Not a problem with dynamo. The endless endurance is sometimes handy too... I completed a one-month 1500-mile Strava challenge on dynamo power, doing up to 70-80 miles per night on a state highway. Or in one case, 100 miles: Bike Ride Profile | Slow nighttime 100-miler to Steptoe & back near Spokane | Times and Records | Strava

    Since you mentioned Supernova, I can also remark that I had one and wasn't impressed with it. If you want a highway-riding light, get the Cyo 60-lux or Luxos B, or wait for the Cyo Premium or Edelux II. If you want an off-road dynamo light, maybe one of Kerry's Klites. I think I'm going to get the 1000lm version for my XC bike, I've already got a suitable dynamo wheel.
    Be nice to know which supernova you had. They have one that's 800 lumens now.

    And I don't do just off road or on road riding. I do all sorts of riding in the same ride (if you count the dirt roads as off road which it really is). I need both and wide, long, and tall beam, and I don't just ride highway or city in the same ride, I ride both. So.... :P on the light makers.

  4. #29
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    897
    And where do you get these kerry's klites lights?

  5. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation: znomit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,668
    Quote Originally Posted by aBicycle View Post
    And where do you get these kerry's klites lights?
    www.CNCdelite.com
    DIY LED Bike Lights:
    A few Dynamo builds and some Small battery lights

  6. #31
    mtbr member
    Reputation: androgen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    874
    Quote Originally Posted by aBicycle View Post
    Be nice to know which supernova you had. They have one that's 800 lumens now.

    And I don't do just off road or on road riding. I do all sorts of riding in the same ride (if you count the dirt roads as off road which it really is). I need both and wide, long, and tall beam, and I don't just ride highway or city in the same ride, I ride both. So.... :P on the light makers.
    NiteRider Pro 3600 DIY on bar, Seca 2000 Enduro on helmet. will cover all your needs no matter where you ride.

  7. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Posts
    897
    Yeah, at only a grand it's such a steal! *rolleyes*

  8. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    988
    Quote Originally Posted by androgen View Post
    well i have a "spray light everywhere" Light & Motion Seca on the helmet and i actually had to add a second light on the bar just to fill in the the light at close range because of how throwy the Helmet Mounted Seca is.

    if you mount a bad light on the bar you will have the problem you described. IMO dinotte does not and never has made a good headlight ( just like they have never made a bad tail light ).

    by raising your dinotte to the helmet height you would have immediately cut down the nearfield illumination by a factor of 2X to 3X without sacrificing the throw.
    I see your point, but having the light at or above eye level has a drawback: stuff that protrudes from the surface (rocks, lumber, washboard) no longer casts visible shadows to assist in identifying hazards that have height. Stuff looks flat. I always use my more powerful light at bar level or fork level to skim the terrain surface for that reason, e.g. the Midnight Century Special config shown below, where the course involved lots of washboard that I wanted to avoid, and the lower light position made it easier to spot it.



    The DiNotte got me to mile 54 of 95 before deciding HEY, IT'S SORT OF COLD, I SHOULD SIGNAL "LOW BATTERY!" I've contacted DiNotte about it and I think they basically want to keep using the same circuit for the rest of eternity instead of addressing how it accounts for battery life at low temperatures. NiteRider's stuff is good in that respect, it actually does the math.

    I had a Seca when they first came out, and did try it on my helmet, and it was pretty impressive insofar as throw + fill.

    And where do you get these kerry's klites lights?
    He just put up a new site at klite.com.au. Through-axle dynamos, anyone?

    Be nice to know which supernova you had. They have one that's 800 lumens now.
    They claim it's 800 lumens, yeah. Reports are that it's really not. The model I had was the E3 Pro (single LED) in the "glare-free" asymmetrical beam, which I wanted for road riding. It had a pretty pathetic beam... too wide, not nearly enough throw. Might be good if you ride a bike path at 10-15mph and need to keep track of where the edges are. I got the 60-lux Cyo next and that was much better for the highway. Neither one is any good off-road.

    edit: I forgot to add that the Cyo's standlight walks all over the Supernova's standlight, too.

    And I don't do just off road or on road riding. I do all sorts of riding in the same ride (if you count the dirt roads as off road which it really is). I need both and wide, long, and tall beam, and I don't just ride highway or city in the same ride, I ride both. So.... :P on the light makers.
    I'm with you on that. At the moment, I consider my Cyo and Luxos to be the "baseline" low-beam light that I can just run day or night, and add one of my battery-powered lights for a boost in city visibility, or my DiNotte and a helmet-mounted flashlight for off-roading. At least I can save my battery power until I'm actually at the trailhead.

  9. #34
    mtbr member
    Reputation: androgen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    874
    Quote Originally Posted by mechBgon View Post
    At the moment, I consider my Cyo and Luxos to be the "baseline" low-beam light that I can just run day or night, and add one of my battery-powered lights for a boost in city visibility, or my DiNotte and a helmet-mounted flashlight for off-roading. At least I can save my battery power until I'm actually at the trailhead.
    i was considering the Luxos as a "baseline" light as you say, but damn, with the dynamo and the wheel it is a lot of money for a "baseline" light. i opted for Dosun D400 instead, which ended up being $175 which i had to order directly from Taiwan. it's bright ( i have videos on youtube ) but the cutoff isn't sharp enough to make it throw. oh well, at least it wasn't as expensive as the Luxos LOL.

    the other night i was riding and i realized i really want something throwier than the Dosun on the bar, even if it means using a light without cutoff. in fact i know what i want - i want the NiteRider Pro 3600 DIY there, which i already had last year anyway - but i can't afford it now.

    when i ride on the road there is usually some light all the way to the horizon, and i just need extra light in the mid-field range ( ~ 10 - 15 meters ) to see the road surface. but when i was on the trail-ish path its just my beam and nothingness beyond it, and when i was going downhill i just felt like i have no idea where i'm going - i had this path in front of me that just gradually disappears into nothingness after about 40 meters or so that 2 X Seca 1700 on the helmet were giving me ... of course 40 meters is more than enough to stop even from 30 mph but i need to see where i'm going to be motivated to pedal faster. if i see a wall of blackness in front of me my brain will automatically begin to back off from pedaling ever so slightly, and i'm just not going to get the same workout.

  10. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    417

    Why Bother?

    With the market awash in cheap and bright lights from Asia why even consider a dyno hub to begin with? Unless you are someone with the stamina to ride all night, or who wants to eliminate the charging and battery hassles, go with cheap 'n' easy! When it dies throw it away, get another.

    But if bicycling "off the grid" and unplugged is where you're at the choice is simple.

  11. #36
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    988
    Quote Originally Posted by Ricky J View Post
    With the market awash in cheap and bright lights from Asia why even consider a dyno hub to begin with? Unless you are someone with the stamina to ride all night, or who wants to eliminate the charging and battery hassles, go with cheap 'n' easy! When it dies throw it away, get another.

    But if bicycling "off the grid" and unplugged is where you're at the choice is simple.
    They each have their strengths and drawbacks. Like I mentioned, low temperatures have been a hassle for me with battery lights. When a light is supposed to run for 2-3 hours on HIGH, it's really disappointing to have it flaking out after 30 minutes because it's cold, when I'm just getting into my stride. Not an issue with dynamo. If I want to ride for hours and hours, I don't have to meter out my battery power, either.

    Modern dynamo stuff is also very reliable. If you're out for a 3-5hr sufferfest in wintertime, it's nice to have lights that will work until you actually fall over dead. 71 miles in February, at night, with 6300ft of ascents? Sure, why not. Mountain Bike Ride Profile | Climbing overdose deluxe near Spokane | Times and Records | Strava I'll bring a battery light as a secondary for fast descents.

    OTOH, if you need an off-road style beam pattern, dynamo options are scarce. Very niche.

  12. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    181
    Quote Originally Posted by mechBgon View Post
    OTOH, if you need an off-road style beam pattern, dynamo options are scarce. Very niche.
    You can DIY.

    My dynamo diy setups.

  13. #38
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    210
    Quote Originally Posted by Ricky J View Post
    With the market awash in cheap and bright lights from Asia why even consider a dyno hub to begin with? Unless you are someone with the stamina to ride all night, or who wants to eliminate the charging and battery hassles, go with cheap 'n' easy! When it dies throw it away, get another.

    But if bicycling "off the grid" and unplugged is where you're at the choice is simple.
    Why bother with the hassles of a battery light when you can get a dynamo light that you don't even have to think about?

    A battery light is like that flashlight you keep in the closet - half the time when you go to use it the battery in it is dead. If you use it on a regular basis, the battery is usually charged, but sometimes you forget. Other times it's not with you when you need it.

    A dynamo light is like the headlights on your car - they're always there, and they just work. Do you ever think "I've been using the headlights on my car for a while, guess I need to charge them inside when I get home"? No? Of course not. That's the level of non-hassle you have with a dynamo light that you don't get with a battery light.

    Concerns when riding with a battery light:
    - Did I remember to charge the battery from last time?
    - Is the light on the bike?
    - How much runtime do I have left?
    - How much battery capacity do I have left even when the battery is fully charged?
    - If it's cold out, is the battery going to die sooner than normal?

    I have several battery lights myself, and have had problems with each of these.

    Concerns when riding with a dynamo light:
    - (this space intentionally left blank)

    EDIT: I'm responding to the other post, battery lights have their advantages as other people have already commented. But "absolutely no hassle once set up" is the biggest advantage of a dynamo light, and I find it annoying when people claim battery lights are "easier" somehow.

  14. #39
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Khrystyan27's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    141
    Hi guys!

    https://dx.com/p/xc-997b-cree-3w-200...-4-x-aa-108640

    I intend to buy this bike light and mod it to run off a dynamo hub.

    Anyone tried to do this yet?

  15. #40
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    210
    Quote Originally Posted by Khrystyan27 View Post
    Hi guys!

    https://dx.com/p/xc-997b-cree-3w-200...-4-x-aa-108640

    I intend to buy this bike light and mod it to run off a dynamo hub.

    Anyone tried to do this yet?
    That's unlikely to work. Batteries put out direct currently, dynamo's put out alternating current.

  16. #41
    mtbr member
    Reputation: androgen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    874
    Quote Originally Posted by Khrystyan27 View Post
    Hi guys!

    https://dx.com/p/xc-997b-cree-3w-200...-4-x-aa-108640

    I intend to buy this bike light and mod it to run off a dynamo hub.

    Anyone tried to do this yet?
    on a scale from 1 to 10 where 1 is the worst idea i have ever heard and 10 is the best idea i have ever heard i would rate your idea at about ... 3

  17. #42
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    988
    Quote Originally Posted by PaulRivers View Post
    Concerns when riding with a dynamo light:
    - (this space intentionally left blank)
    Well, I touched on one of dynamo's drawbacks earlier. If you want an off-road beam pattern, there just aren't many options out there right now. Exposure Revo 4, Klite, maybe Supernova E3 Triple. Any others?

    I've ridden off-road with dynamo lights that have the vaunted German-spec cutoff beam. Scary experience. They're great for the highway, and I just ordered up the new Cyo Premium for that scenario.

    The other concern is that the cutoff-style beam, intended to be friendly to oncoming traffic, may not be enough to get noticed in heavy traffc, or another example is riding in a bike lane next to high-turnover parking spots, where you need to be seen by people about to throw their door open or pull out of their parking spot after a glance in their mirror. For these situations, even a small "sprayer" light will help, especially if it has a flashing or pulsing mode. The latter criterion pretty much rules out dynamo lights, I have yet to see a dynamo light with a pulse or strobe setting.

    So for myself, I consider dynamo a great baseline, especially for road (or off-road if you can afford an off-road model) and may throw on battery lights for their own merits.

  18. #43
    mtbr member
    Reputation: androgen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    874
    Quote Originally Posted by mechBgon View Post
    So for myself, I consider dynamo a great baseline and may throw on battery lights for their own merits.
    good strategy for those who can afford it.

  19. #44
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    210
    Quote Originally Posted by mechBgon View Post
    Well, I touched on one of dynamo's drawbacks earlier. If you want an off-road beam pattern, there just aren't many options out there right now. Exposure Revo 4, Klite, maybe Supernova E3 Triple. Any others?
    The regular Supernova as well. Not as expensive as the triple, but it's a regular round beam.

    Quote Originally Posted by mechBgon View Post
    I've ridden off-road with dynamo lights that have the vaunted German-spec cutoff beam. Scary experience. They're great for the highway, and I just ordered up the new Cyo Premium for that scenario.
    Yeah, they're not meant for offroad. Of course since the dynamo light is attached to your bike, this assumes that you're riding a suspension mountain bike as a commuter as well? That's...not impossible, but unusual...

    Quote Originally Posted by mechBgon View Post
    The other concern is that the cutoff-style beam, intended to be friendly to oncoming traffic, may not be enough to get noticed in heavy traffc, or another example is riding in a bike lane next to high-turnover parking spots, where you need to be seen by people about to throw their door open or pull out of their parking spot after a glance in their mirror. For these situations, even a small "sprayer" light will help, especially if it has a flashing or pulsing mode. The latter criterion pretty much rules out dynamo lights, I have yet to see a dynamo light with a pulse or strobe setting.

    So for myself, I consider dynamo a great baseline, especially for road (or off-road if you can afford an off-road model) and may throw on battery lights for their own merits.
    I don't know of any either, if you spent a lot of time on the street I prefer a blinking front light for a "be seen" light. Keep in mind that not using a dynamo, you'd generally have to have 2 lights for this as well, as a blinking front light makes a good "to be seen" light, but a pretty terrible "see with" light.

  20. #45
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Khrystyan27's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    141
    Quote Originally Posted by PaulRivers View Post
    That's unlikely to work. Batteries put out direct currently, dynamo's put out alternating current.
    How hard can it be to open the light and add a bridge rectifier and a capacitor. I know batteries put out direct current.

    Quote Originally Posted by androgen View Post
    on a scale from 1 to 10 where 1 is the worst idea i have ever heard and 10 is the best idea i have ever heard i would rate your idea at about ... 3
    Please develop your idea.

  21. #46
    mtbr member
    Reputation: androgen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    874
    Quote Originally Posted by Khrystyan27 View Post
    Please develop your idea.
    with so many well made lights already designed for generator use what would be the point of taking a bad light not designed for it and then modifying it ?

    the problem with generators is limited wattage. your mod would not solve that. in fact it would not solve any problem that exists. and it might not even work - every time you stopped your light might turn off etc.

    even if you are able to work out all of the problems there is simply no benefit to be had in the end.

  22. #47
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Khrystyan27's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    141
    Quote Originally Posted by androgen View Post
    with so many well made lights already designed for generator use what would be the point of taking a bad light not designed for it and then modifying it ?

    Of course... THE PRICE! Who wants to give 70$, or so, for dynamo lights like Philips Safe Ride and B&M. For that price I could buy a Gemini Duo clone and a spare XP-G flashlight.

    the problem with generators is limited wattage. your mod would not solve that. in fact it would not solve any problem that exists. and it might not even work - every time you stopped your light might turn off etc.

    My actual halogen light that broke into pieces, did the same thing (the wheel stops, no light...) I'm used to it.

    even if you are able to work out all of the problems there is simply no benefit to be had in the end.

    That's not true. I could have a good light for my commuter for under 25$. I also have a home-made 2x XM-L light (check my threads). I just want a dynamo LED light for the days when I forget to recharge the XM-L batteries.
    ...

  23. #48
    mtbr member
    Reputation: androgen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    874
    Quote Originally Posted by Khrystyan27 View Post
    ...
    what i meant is that when you stop your light may turn off and will not turn back on when you start to pedal until you press the button again. so you might have to press the button over and over and over again on every ride ...

  24. #49
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Khrystyan27's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Posts
    141
    I will do something about it...

    All I wanted to know is if it will work considering that DX states that the headlight has a 3W LED (the dynamo has 6V/3W output - typical power for dynamo hub's).

  25. #50
    mtbr member
    Reputation: androgen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    874
    Quote Originally Posted by Khrystyan27 View Post
    I will do something about it...

    All I wanted to know is if it will work considering that DX states that the headlight has a 3W LED (the dynamo has 6V/3W output - typical power for dynamo hub's).
    if you want to know if it will work you should probably ask at the DIY forum ...

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 1 2 3 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Bike Generator
    By locobaylor in forum Bikepacking and Bike Expedition
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 05-23-2013, 12:32 AM
  2. Online gibberish generator
    By Axe in forum Off Camber (off topic)
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 12-12-2012, 03:18 PM
  3. Hub generator powered light
    By dstorjoh in forum Lights and Night Riding
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 10-21-2012, 05:17 AM
  4. Best deal on a generator hub/wheel/lights?
    By Jaybo in forum Commuting
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 08-07-2012, 06:50 AM
  5. Nuke Proof Generator hub ?
    By keen in forum Wheels and Tires
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-05-2012, 12:37 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •